Avie Tevanian named Chief Software Technology Officer

MacRumors

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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Apple announced that Avie Tevanian has been named Chief Software Technology Officer of Apple and Bertrand Serlet will be promoted to senior vice president of Software Engineering to take the Tavanian's former position.

Tevanian joined Apple after the NeXT acquisition and was a major figure involved in NeXTStep and subsequently Mac OS X.
 

jouster

macrumors 65816
Jan 21, 2002
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One would thus assume that NeXT will continue to provide the basis for OS X.

Perhaps we can make some guesses as to the OS's future path by looking more closely at NeXTStep.
 

cubist

macrumors 68020
Jul 4, 2002
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Muncie, Indiana
Who was the Chief Software Technology Officer before, or did they have such a position? It actually sounds like some kind of 'golden parking space'.
 

tny

macrumors 6502
Jun 3, 2003
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Washington, DC
Golden Parking Space

Could have a point there. It might be a matter of promoting Tevanian to give him more leisure time, or provide him with time for more public-oriented functions, and to provide him with a slot underneath him to which to promote an annointed successor.
 

jouster

macrumors 65816
Jan 21, 2002
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Isn't Tevanian a bit young to be put out to pasture in that way?

Still, they could have called him Chief Software Architect™ - now who is it that we know who has that title?

Hmmm.....
 

Jeff Harrell

macrumors regular
Apr 19, 2003
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Originally posted by jouster
Still, they could have called him Chief Software Architect™ - now who is it that we know who has that title?
Me.

I held the title of chief software architect two jobs ago.

Doesn't mean squat. It's just another form of middle-management.
 

JoeRadar

macrumors regular
May 28, 2003
153
0
Originally posted by jouster
Isn't Tevanian a bit young to be put out to pasture in that way?
Maybe he is suffering burn-out. Avie has had a lot of pressure on him for about a decade: heading up the NeXT OS development effort, and then Apple's OS effort. And both of these were do-or-die efforts for each company. No pressure there :eek:

Add in the years Avie worked on Mach at CMU, and I would not be surprised if he wants something new.
 

jettredmont

macrumors 68030
Jul 25, 2002
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Originally posted by jouster
One would thus assume that NeXT will continue to provide the basis for OS X.

Perhaps we can make some guesses as to the OS's future path by looking more closely at NeXTStep.
Ummm, Avie has been the head of the OS X development team this whole time. Now he's moving to the company-wide C(S)TO ...

Yes, of course, OS X is based on NeXT and mirrors much of what NeXT did ... I thought this was a well-known fact?
 

jouster

macrumors 65816
Jan 21, 2002
1,190
147
Connecticut
Originally posted by jettredmont
Ummm, Avie has been the head of the OS X development team this whole time. Now he's moving to the company-wide C(S)TO ...

Yes, of course, OS X is based on NeXT and mirrors much of what NeXT did ... I thought this was a well-known fact?

What it is based on now isn't necessarily the same as what it will become. My only point was that this strengthens NeXTStep's hold on Apple. You make a good point when you extend this to company wide policy, however.

Also, I hasten to add that I firmly belive the NeXT influence to have been an extremely positive thing.
 

tex210

macrumors 6502
Jul 8, 2003
292
76
Bertrand Serlet

I think Bertrand Serlet is the real news here. He will report directly to Jobs. He was involved with Rhapsody I believe.... what was that UI to be like?
Yellow and blue boxxes? Don't kill me, this is my first ever post here... read a lot, but I had to register because.... Marklar was tied into this wasn't it? Maybe they've put Marklar away since the G5 is here, and they can use Serlet's expertise somehow. Anyone know anything about him?
 

Foocha

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2001
588
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London
Mac OS X saved Apple, and Avie Tevanian was a big part of that. Surely this is simple - the man deserves a promotion for a job well done.
 

wfzelle

macrumors newbie
Jul 19, 2002
15
0
Originally posted by jouster
Also, I hasten to add that I firmly believe the NeXT influence to have been an extremely positive thing.
There are upsides and downsides. One of the negative sides of the new Apple is its inconsistency. Metal apps & regular ones, the Finder which is partially browser-like and partially spatial, disregard for Applescript by many of Apple's own apps, etc. The NeXT guys also have a severe case of NIH. They wanted to drop Applescript for something developed by them, they refused to include labels until now (easy to program), they use extensions instead of metadata and they copied that awful dock from NextStep.

On the other hand, the Unix core of OS X has many advantages. Still, I would appreciate a bit more vision in the usability area.
 

AppleMatt

macrumors 68000
Mar 17, 2003
1,780
20
UK
Originally posted by Jeff Harrell
Me.

I held the title of chief software architect two jobs ago.

Doesn't mean squat. It's just another form of middle-management.
Gates silly.

Yet strangely accurate.

AppleMatt
 

Fukui

macrumors 68000
Jul 19, 2002
1,618
7
Originally posted by Foocha
Mac OS X saved Apple, and Avie Tevanian was a big part of that. Surely this is simple - the man deserves a promotion for a job well done.
Absolutely, he deserves a freakin tropical island for the job he's done! Mach, NEXTSTEP, OS 8, OS 9, X server, 10.1 10.2 etc, this guy is a top class manager. Good thing he didn't go and work at MS when Gates wanted him back in the day...:D
 

catalystx

macrumors newbie
Apr 3, 2003
12
0
NIH stands for "Not Invented Here", which refers to a company refusing to use something not invented by them. Apple was seriously NIH until the mid 90s and still show slight tendencies.
 

SubGothius

macrumors member
Apr 29, 2003
56
0
Tucson, AZ
Originally posted by tex210
I think Bertrand Serlet is the real news here. He will report directly to Jobs. He was involved with Rhapsody I believe.... what was that UI to be like?
Imagine Mac OS 9 and NeXTSTEP parented a child together; that would be Rhapsody (aka the very first Mac OS X Server), which looked superficially like Mac OS 9 (most UI widgets, top-edge menubar, desktop, etc.) but acted like NeXTSTEP (the look'n'feel of most apps, and the inner workings "under the hood"); that child then grew up to establish a distinctive adult identity all its own as Mac OS X, while still retaining subtle resemblance to its child self and to its parents.
Yellow and blue boxes?
The various coloured boxen (among geex like us, I gather this is the preferred plural for "box" ;) ) were OS X's layers of support for various application programming interfaces -- the Blue Box was OS X's support for the classic Mac OS API (i.e., the Carbon API, and the Classic environment running Mac OS 9 as an app within OS X), and the Yellow Box was OS X's native API (i.e., Cocoa). IIRC, some aborted projects included a Yellow Box for Windows (installing YBW on a WinTel machine would have allowed that machine to run Cocoa apps!), and there was also some rumour of a proposed Red Box for OS X that would have allowed OS X to support Windows APIs (i.e., run Windows apps in OS X without also running a virtual/emulated Windows OS like VirtualPC!).

I'm thinking the latter, if not the former as well, got the axe as part of the M$ agreement way back when, where the Giant Head of Bill Gates appeared on the Jumbotron (looking eerily like Big Brother from the 1984 commercial -- I kept expecting the chick with the hammer to run in ;) ), looming behind Steve on the stage at Macworld to promise M$ would invest in Apple and continue developing apps (e.g., IE, Office, etc.) for the Mac for several years, which agreement may well have helped Steve save Apple. Now that the terms of the agreement have expired, and M$-Apple relations seem less peachy (no more IE, iApps muscling in on M$ territory, etc.), I wouldn't be surprised if the Yellow Box for Windows or the Red Box projects get pulled out of mothballs and dusted off (ew, mothball dust... :p ).
Marklar was tied into this wasn't it? Maybe they've put Marklar away since the G5 is here...
Marklar is an Apple-internal developmental build of Mac OS X rejiggered and recompiled to run on x86 hardware (it occurs to me now that it may incorporate some former YBW and/or Red Box technologies...?). I gather that Marklar was not primarily intended to support any speculative migration to x86 CPUs in Apple hardware (which move would entail truly Drastic Measures in the way of legacy software support alone); rather, Apple may be preparing Marklar as an "Ace in the hole" to spring on the market as an alternative to Windows on x86 boxen. It will lie in wait for a time when WinTel users realize that the draconian "safety and security features" that M$ is foisting upon them in future versions of Windows, Office, etc. are not in their best interests, leading them to look for an easier, prettier alternative than installing "that Linux thing" they've heard about. Of course, Marklar could not run Classic Mac (Blue Box) apps, but it could run OS X-native Cocoa apps (which might still need a recompile for x86 unless YBW gets revived and efficient enough), and it might also be able to support existing Windows apps, using some adaptation of the Red Box.

<tongue-in-cheeky ad copy>
"Sick of Big Brother enforcing whatever it thinks is best for you? Tired of 'Everything not forbidden is mandatory'? Perhaps you'd prefer the freedom and beauty of Mac OS X86 instead. It installs painlessly on your existing hardware and can run most of your existing Windows applications; it's the NeXT best thing to having a bona fide Apple Macintosh. Freedom from Tyranny: Yours for only $129"
</tongue-in-cheeky ad copy>
:D
 

FriarTuck

macrumors 6502
May 26, 2003
442
3
Chicago area
Don't forget his role in the Microsoft trial:

"Microsoft attorney Theodore Edelman pounced on the fact that Apple senior vice president Avie Tevanian had to amend his initial testimony to say Microsoft's multimedia kit could, in fact, support file-streaming. Tevanian had originally said it could not. He also had said, at first, that Microsoft technology only supported proprietary standards, when it also supports some common standards, including HTTP.

In his questioning, Edelman also got Tevanian to acknowledge Microsoft sent to Apple developer Tim Schaaff a beta version of its Windows media player the very day Schaaff requested it, along with an e-mail saying Microsoft hoped this would fix Apple's problem. "
 

trrosen

macrumors regular
Apr 29, 2003
169
0
the bigger picture

I wonder if this is both an idication of OS X's maturity and of change in focus at Apple from the OS to NEW APPLICATIONS. Avie seems to be the man Jobs trusts most and this change seems to take him away from focusing on X to Apple's software in general.

Who knows maybe Adobe's trash talking has finally pissed Jobs off enough to have Avie generate a few more pro programs.
iPhotoPro (based on open source gimp)
PublishPro (the InDesign and Quark killer)
MacDrawPro

opps did we just wipe out all of Adobe's profit makers...sorry
 

Compufix

macrumors regular
May 7, 2002
123
4
PA
Originally posted by FriarTuck
Don't forget his role in the Microsoft trial:

"Microsoft attorney Theodore Edelman pounced on the fact that Apple senior vice president Avie Tevanian had to amend his initial testimony to say Microsoft's multimedia kit could, in fact, support file-streaming. Tevanian had originally said it could not. He also had said, at first, that Microsoft technology only supported proprietary standards, when it also supports some common standards, including HTTP.
I would assume what was meant was how Microsoft takes a "standard" and makes changes to it to benefit Microsoft while still supporting the "standard". Ohh and btw you get all these great features ONLY if you are running on Windows....but we support the standards...puleaze...

Give you an example...yes...IIS and IE support HTTP, but when using IE to talk to an IIS server (windows-windows) MS kills half of the STANDARD negotion talks between the two defined in the HTTP STANDARD , giving THEIR client talking to THEIR server the appearance of being much faster....
 

dongmin

macrumors 68000
Jan 3, 2002
1,708
0
now that OS X has matured, maybe Apple is giving Tevanian some breathing room to figure out The Next Big Thing in software. As in, OS 11. Should be out by the time Longhorn finally hits the market (2006).
 
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