'Becca and Andy headed for the slammer

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Ugg, Nov 20, 2012.

  1. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #1
    BBC

    Good news for Britain. It'll be interesting to see how this falls out in the US. Now that bribery has been established, it could have an impact on Murdoch personally since he's a US citizen.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #2
    Very good new for the UK. And an outcome I am delighted to see.
     
  3. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Good..... id like to see them both in prison, and to be completely honest, I'd quite like murdochs head on a plate.
     
  4. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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  5. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #5
    What I worry about is that Parliament and the government seem to be taking aim at the press with various inquiries. Surely it is sufficient to prosecute journalists suspected of breaking the law, as in these cases. (I'd add prosecutions for organized crime as well).

    Perhaps it is cynical, but it sounds like the political momentum to 'reign in the press' will wind up hurting freedom of speech and freedom of the press. Certainly that would make the politicians happy, for it is annoying when the journalists reveal that one paid for a floating duck island out of taxpayer's money.
     
  6. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #6
    Yes, the pendulum might swing too far the other way.

    This would be the greatest disservice these idiots could do to those who ply their craft in a legitimate manner.

    And us too. ;)
     
  7. Scepticalscribe, Nov 20, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #7
    I see the points both of you have made, and it is a more than fair argument and I won't hide that it is one that bothers me.

    The real pity of it is that the media have shown themselves wholly incapable of any sort of meaningful self-interrogation or self-regulation.

    And Murdoch and his cronies and clones have been a real, and nasty and serious threat to British democracy - and to any sort of genuine media independence or pluralism. So, I'm delighted that his media empire has been cut down to size. Besides, his influence was execrable on the standards and the tone (not to mention the content and how much of it was acquired) of a lot of the media in the UK - this guy was too big and too dangerous not to be dealt with when opportunity presented. Remember how the political elites felt that they were compelled to grovel to him, defer to him, week-ends at Chequers sort of thing, and were supposed to show excessive sympathy towards his plans to emasculate state broadcasting, i.e. the BBC? (Which, alas, is all too busily shooting itself in the foot and elsewhere, without any outside interference whatsoever, but that is another story...)

    However, I agree with both posts; I'd hate to see political elites use this sort of conduct as an excuse for further curtailment of the right of the press to carry out investigations.
     
  8. iJohnHenry, Nov 20, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2012

    iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #8
    I feel that the problem stems from the fact that the media now requires revenue from ads, and that requires that they appeal to the lowest common denominator in crafting their 'news' reporting.

    Sadly, the days of mainly subscription-based news sources are on the wane.
     
  9. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #9
    Honestly I think the solution to the phone hacking scandal is actually quite clear: there appears to have been a conspiracy in the management of certain news corporations to steal information illegally. They were doing this for profit. Thus, this rather makes those corporations organized crime syndicates, and they should be treated as such, including confiscation of illegal profits from the individuals involved etc. Top of that list is Murdoch.
     
  10. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    #10
    Not so sure the Murdoch empire is getting cut down to size. He shuffled some of the board around, closed down a paper, only to reopen a new one months later, and last I heard he was working some rebranding in the UK networks to give Fox more visibility.

    There's no Murdoch in the docks, just a couple of pawns. And Cameron is terrified to mention the word legislation in case the papers rally against him and he loses the next GE. Murdoch rules the UK as much now as he has before, he's just been humiliated to a degree.
     
  11. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #11
    Milliband isn't scared...
     

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