Best Cleaner For Macs ???

musicmad2000

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 15, 2012
60
0
Hi

I'm looking for a good all round cleaner for my Mac. Would i be wise to install OnyX Cleaning Programe? or Ccleaner

Could anyone recommend :rolleyes:

Thanks.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,396
709
I'm looking for a good all round cleaner for my Mac.
You don't need "cleaner" or "maintenance" apps to keep your Mac running well, and some of these apps can do more harm than good. Some remove files/folders or unused languages or architectures, which does nothing more than free up some drive space, with the risk of deleting something important in the process.

These apps will not make your Mac run faster or more efficiently, since having stuff stored on a drive does not impact performance, unless you're running out of drive space. Some of these apps delete caches, which can hurt performance, rather than help it, since more system resources are used and performance suffers while each cache is being rebuilt.

Many of these tasks should only be done selectively to troubleshoot specific problems, not en masse as routine maintenance.

Mac OS X does a good job of taking care of itself, without the need for 3rd party software. Among other things, it has its own maintenance scripts that run silently in the background on a daily, weekly and monthly basis, without user intervention.

 

interrobang

macrumors 6502
May 25, 2011
369
0
For getting smudges off of your screen, Apple suggests (and sells) Basuch + Lomb Clens, mainly to protect the special coating on iPad/iPhone devices. Since Mac displays don't have that coating, any screen cleaner like KlearScreen or the Monster ScreenClean should also work well.

For removing dust, use canned/compressed air. If you use a vacuum, use it only on the outside of the case and leave the computer plugged into a grounded outlet while you work.

Software, of course, cannot "clean" your computer. Dirt is a hardware issue.
 

yojitani

macrumors 68000
Apr 28, 2005
1,856
10
An octopus's garden
While the first two posts are more or less correct, there are some things an automation programme like Onyx or CCleaner (available in MAS) can do to make things easy. For example, I find it necessary to rebuild my Spotlight index about once every 6 to 9 months. Also, about once every 18 to 24 months my Finder starts acting strangely, so rebuilding LaunchServices is necessary. You can also repair permissions from within automation programs.

Although you can reset your various browsers from within the browsers themselves, automation software can do this for you too. This is necessary every now and then if you use Safari as it stores a huge cache of image files.
Doing things like deleting the Cache of various components and services usually doesn't solve any problems for me, but it does add a bit of novelty to the desktop experience!

I would strongly recommend against using CleanMyMac. It has a number of settings that can ruin installed programmes (particularly the binary cleaner). It is also difficult to remove from your computer (do a search on MR about this product). OnyX is good as is CCleaner. I prefer OnyX personally, its documentation is better.

Another useful utility is a disk measurement tool like WhatSize. Programmes like these don't clean your disk, but can help you identify oversized files.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,396
709
I find it necessary to rebuild my Spotlight index about once every 6 to 9 months.
That's very simple to do without a 3rd party app.
Spotlight: How to re-index folders or volumes
so rebuilding LaunchServices is necessary.
You can rebuild LaunchServices without a 3rd party app. Simply enter the following command into Terminal:
/System/Library/Frameworks/ApplicationServices.framework/\
Frameworks/LaunchServices.framework/Support/lsregister \
-kill -r -domain local -domain system -domain user​
You can also repair permissions from within automation programs.
Some people repair, or recommend repairing permissions for situations where it isn't appropriate. Repairing permissions only addresses very specific issues. It is not a "cure all" or a general performance enhancer, and doesn't need to be done on a regular basis. It also doesn't address permissions problems with your files or 3rd party apps.

Five Mac maintenance myths
Disk Utility repairs the permissions for files installed by the Mac OS X Installer, Software Update, or an Apple software installer. It doesn’t repair permissions for your documents, your home folder, and third-party applications.

You can verify or repair permissions only on a disk with Mac OS X installed.
Does Disk Utility check permissions on all files?

Files that aren't installed as part of an Apple-originated installer package are not listed in a receipt and therefore are not checked. For example, if you install an application using a non-Apple installer application, or by copying it from a disk image, network volume, or other disk instead of installing it via Installer, a receipt file isn't created. This is expected. Some applications are designed to be installed in one of those ways.

Also, certain files whose permissions can be changed during normal usage without affecting their function are intentionally not checked.
There are times when repairing permissions is appropriate. To do so, here are the instructions:
If repairing permissions results in error messages, some of these messages can be ignored and should be no cause for concern.
Although you can reset your various browsers from within the browsers themselves, automation software can do this for you too.
That's much quicker and simpler to do within the browser, rather than launching a 3rd party app for that.
Doing things like deleting the Cache of various components and services usually doesn't solve any problems for me, but it does add a bit of novelty to the desktop experience!
Deleting cache files can negatively impact your system performance. Read the link on maintenance myths that I posted.
 

musicmad2000

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 15, 2012
60
0
Thanks! everyone for all your advice, I'll go with OnyX and use it only when necessary. With Macs generally taking care of themselves am i right in saying there is no need for any anti virus applications if i fear i may hit some dodgy website whilst navigating over the internet :confused:
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,396
709
Thanks! everyone for all your advice, I'll go with OnyX and use it only when necessary. With Macs generally taking care of themselves am i right in saying there is no need for any anti virus applications if i fear i may hit some dodgy website whilst navigating over the internet :confused:
You don't need any 3rd party antivirus app to keep your Mac malware-free. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. You cannot infect your Mac simply by visiting a website, unzipping a file, opening an email attachment or joining a network. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which cannot infect your Mac unless you actively install them, and they can be easily avoided with some basic education, common sense and care in what software you install. Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
  1. Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall

  2. Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General

  3. Uncheck "Enable Java" in Safari > Preferences > Security. Leave this unchecked until you visit a trusted site that requires Java, then re-enable only for your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)

  4. Check your DNS settings by reading this.

  5. Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.

  6. Never let someone else have physical access to install anything on your Mac.

  7. Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.
That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any virus, trojan, spyware, keylogger, or other malware. You don't need any 3rd party software to keep your Mac secure.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,396
709
There doesn't seem to be an enable or disable tab, only
1 Allow incoming connections
2 Allow only essential services
3 Set access for specific services and applications
I'm assuming it's either,
Allow incoming connections
Block incoming connections

which one do i select :confused:
Click the ? icon in the lower right corner to read more about the firewall settings. In the window that pops up, click "Setting firewall access for services and applications" to learn more about apps.

Mac OS X v10.5, 10.6: About the Application Firewall
 
Last edited:

musicmad2000

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 15, 2012
60
0
GGJstudios


Complied with the instructions you quoted for Mac protection except the Firewall. There doesn't seem to be an enable or disable tab, only


1 Allow incoming connections.

2 Allow only essential services.

3 Set access for specific services and applications.


I'm assuming it's either,

Allow incoming connections

Block incoming connections


which one do i select?

I also checked System preferences > General, and there is no option for (automatically update safe downloads list) for "Mac defender" does my OS have it?

Macbook 5.1. OS X Leopard 10.5.8.


Sorry pretty new to the Mac OS X.
 

musicmad2000

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 15, 2012
60
0
What are you looking for?
In the link you gave Anti malware protection it stated..


Apple maintains a list of known malicious software that is used during the safe download check to determine if a file contains malicious software. The list is stored locally, and with Security Update 2011-003 is updated daily by a background process.

If you do not wish to receive these updates, you can disable daily update by unchecking "Automatically update safe downloads list" in the Security pane, in System Preferences.

I don't have this title in my system preferences > security.
is it because I'm on Mac OS X Leopard and not Snow Leopard?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,396
709
Does that mean i don't have "Mac defender" protection?
You don't need it. As it says in that section:
To prevent these files from launching in the future, uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in your Safari Preferences.
As long as you don't install something that just randomly pops up, you can't be affected by it. Follow the 7 tips I posted in post #8 and you don't have to worry about malware.
 

musicmad2000

macrumors member
Original poster
Mar 15, 2012
60
0
Excellent GG, thanks for the tutorial and links, you've been a helpful.

Thanks everyone else.

Best
Mm.