Bought a refurb 17 MBP, have DVI to VGA adapter, want to hook up to TV

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by cmm, Jul 15, 2009.

  1. cmm macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    OK, new question, I have a refurb 17 MBP. store.apple.com states it comes with "DVI to VGA adapter" and I noticed an adapter in there.

    Can I buy a VGA cable to run to the TV? What is the max resolution I'll get? I bought this TV: http://www.crutchfield.com/p_305LN32360/Samsung-LN32B360.html?tp=161&tab=features_and_specs

    It says resolution is 1366x768 but is that for the TV or max resolution regardless (I know NOTHING about televisions...)

    Are there any downsides to using VGA vs HDMI? I'd rather save $100 in cables/adapters if possible.

    Thank you for putting up with my incessant questions!
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #2
  3. cmm thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    Damn, I wanted to save some money.

    What is this PC IN port then? http://akamaipix.crutchfield.com/products/2009/04/305/h305LN32360-b_003.jpeg

    I guess it's this, what is it? Is this something any normal TV store or Wal*Mart would have?

    PC Input: This input consists of a stereo mini-jack and an analog RGB (D-Sub 15-pin) jack. This jack allows you to connect a personal computer with a D-Sub 15-pin output. When using the RGB (D-Sub 15-pin) jack, you must use the PC Audio 3.5mm input for your audio connection.

    Does HDMI do sound or not?

    I need a female or male adapter?
     
  4. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #4
    Sorry, didn't see the "PC IN" in the specs, as that is not the correct designation.

    It seems to be a VGA-input (15 pins and so on), so you should be fine with your DVI>VGA adapter and a proper cable.
    VGA will support the resolution of the TV, as VGA seems to have no limit.
     
  5. cmm thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Thanks! I just want to make sure that's right. I did some further research on: http://www.crutchfield.com/learn/learningcenter/home/connections_glossary.html

    It says the type of plugin I have is:

    RGB (D-sub 15-pin) jack
    Found on some HDTV-ready TVs and HDTV tuner boxes, RGB connections are used for transferring video signals, including high-definition content. As implied by its name, RGB sends the red, green, and blue components of the video signal along separate paths.

    Though RGB connections can take a number of forms, one that's increasingly common on TVs and set-top boxes is the D-sub 15-pin jack. If you own a computer, D-sub 15-pin connections may look familiar — they're the same ones found on standard VGA-type computer monitors. RGB connections pass video signals in the analog domain.

    But crutchfield also has a special entry for VGA:



    VGA (Video Graphics Array) connector
    While used primarily for computer monitors, VGA cables also connect to LCD flat-panel screens that display images from both traditional audio/video and computer video sources. These 15-pin connectors carry packets of digital information in a different format than that coming from other sources such as DVD players or cable boxes.




    So it's the same thing? I just want to be sure - this is really irritating me. :/
     
  6. Freyqq macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    #6
    in that picture you linked, the blue rectangular-looking port is a VGA port aka RGB aka PC IN.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA
     
  7. lixuelai macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 29, 2008
    #7
    It does not hurt to try however you might not get the full resolution. Some TVs have castrated VGA inputs.
     
  8. mainomega macrumors 6502

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    Jun 5, 2007
    #8
    PM me your information and i'll send you a dvi-vga and dvi-hdmi adapters.
     

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