BP Gulf disaster may have triggered a 'world-killing' event {debunked?}

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by yoyo5280, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. yoyo5280 macrumors 68000

    yoyo5280

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    #1
  2. Loves2spoon macrumors 65816

    Loves2spoon

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    #2
    I bet you believe we're all going to die December 21st 2012 right? :rolleyes:
     
  3. yoyo5280 thread starter macrumors 68000

    yoyo5280

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    #3
    Omg Like Duh Death By 2012.

    Seriously though... it was an interesting read. I'm open to all theories...not that I particularly believe anything.
     
  4. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    #4
    Well, let's put it this way. My standard-issue sunbelt suburban swimming pool is about 20,000 gallons. So, a million gallons is about 50 swimming-pools' worth.

    We're talking, then, about a few sunbelt suburban blocks' worth of swimming pools filled with oil, leaking into the vastness of the Gulf each day.

    So that puts it somewhat in perspective. A terrible mess, but it's not like the Gulf is filling up with crude.

    There's no doubt, however, that the EPA and other (mostly federal) authorities have made the situation far worse than it had to be, with decisions like the approvals to use massive quantities of toxic dispersants (which allowed the oil to flow in gigantic miles-long subsurface tubes of emulsion, and which increased their effective surface area, causing a bacterial bloom which has dropped oxygen levels), blocking Louisiana from building protective sand-berms, halting clean-up barges for fire-extinguisher compliance checks, etc etc.
     
  5. Frisco macrumors 68020

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    I wouldn't doubt it--humans are and will eventually kill the earth.
     
  6. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #6
    Yeah but the article isn't really concerned with the oil. It's the possibility of a large methane bubble being released due to all the action around the well.
     
  7. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #7
    Well they were experimental, so I guess they didn't necessary work.

    Why didn't the boats comply?


    +1
     
  8. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #8
    No we aren't and no we won't. We might be killing the ability of the Earth to sustain our life. The Earth will be fine long after we are gone.
     
  9. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #9
    If you open your mind too much, your brain will fall out.
     
  10. yoyo5280 thread starter macrumors 68000

    yoyo5280

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    Are you saying that there is an absolute 0% chance that methane could be coming out of this because you have critical thinking skills?
    Forgive me for doubting your brain which clearly has NOT fallen out.

    Look, just because I posted this does NOT mean I believe everything it says.
    I posted it for discussion, not flame the O.P.
     
  11. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #11
    You must believe some of it, or you wouldn't call it TERRIFYING.

    You're young, you're easily influenced, this sort of behavior is to be expected.

    But this is utter crap. Move on.
     
  12. yoyo5280 thread starter macrumors 68000

    yoyo5280

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    #12
    Fair enough. Perhaps the only post to call it rubbish with out turning into a flame war.

    Thankyou

    Love,
    Omi
     
  13. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    Meh. Shrug. If gigantic cataclysmic geological methane farts can happen, you'd think we would have experienced them, what with volcanoes and seismic faults and meteor strikes and so on poking much bigger holes in the earth's crust than BP ever could.

    To me, the most concerning of all is the utterly insane Keystone Kops act from our self-anointed betters in Washington. Because he bigger disaster has been the Administration's dithering response and some of its outright catastrophic decisions, top among them those dispersants. The consequences of those is that now we have gigantic, miles-long plumes of emulsified petroleum floating far underwater, destroying deepwater ecosystems through a combination of toxicity and oxygen depletion, and headed for the Gulf Stream. That's never happened before, because we've never been so stupid as to use dispersants so far underwater in such vast quantities.

    Then there are the cleanup barges, ordered back to port by the Coast Guard so bucktoothed inspection clerks could run down their authorized official fire-extinguisher and life-preserver checklists in triplicate using only the authorized official No. 2 pencils and validated with the authorized official inspectors' stamps-- a process which delayed the barges by 24 hours. There's the blocking of Louisiana's urgent efforts to build shoreline-protecting sand berms, the refusal to grant waivers of union-crew laws, the rejection of help from other countries. There's the insane insistence that oil-separation boats can emit only 99.9% oil-free filtered water, necessitating lengthy trips to shore to discharge 97% oil-free water for further filtration. Idiocy! And then there was the original idiocy, the granting of the politically-connected BP's permit waivers just over a year ago. That started the ball rolling.

    The buck for each of those decisions stops in Washington. A more stunningly uncoordinated, detached, bureaucratic and rudderless response has never been seen. Watching this all unfold, I am repeatedly embarrassed to be an American. We used to be competent.

    So idiocy, cluelessness and that unique brand of Washingtonian hubris have compounded the disaster, magnified it, exponentiated it... and, arguably, started it, with the kiss-kiss relationship between the Administration and its big campaign contributor, BP.

    And then: Why were we drilling a mile deep and forty miles out, where we had no clue what we were facing, and when there's plenty of oil in more accessible places on the continent? Washington again.
     
  14. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    Can we really blame Washington for what a foreign company is doing?
     
  15. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #15
    BP is at least half a US operation.
     
  16. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #16
    Then we can...
     
  17. JediZenMaster macrumors 68000

    JediZenMaster

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    Thanks for sharing the article. It's pretty scary and is a possibility. You will have to ignore the haters in this thread.
     
  18. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #18
    "Why were we drilling a mile deep and forty miles out..."

    Because that is where the oil is. And Obama's made some two billion dollars avaiilable to Petrobras, to drill at a greater distance and in 8,000 feet of water. (FWIW, Soros owns a goodly interest in Petrobras.)

    Byron King says he's seen the future of the awl-drillin' bidness; made in S. Korea: http://whiskeyandgunpowder.com/the-future-of-the-worlds-energy-supply/

    Check out today's Oil Drum: http://www.theoildrum.com/
     
  19. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

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    #19
    Interesting read, a bit too speculative and doomsday-esk for my liking, but still, it makes sense, and to be honest, it's stuff like this that will probably cause a methane eruption.
     
  20. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    #20
    Good grief. It's operating in US waters and needed a permit and certain exemptions. It got 'em, and then proceeded to futz up pretty badly. But Washington has made the problem far worse than it had to be. Read my post, I'm not going it all over again.
     
  21. sjinsjca macrumors 68000

    sjinsjca

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    Sure. Costly, inaccessible oil extractable at great risk and with many unknowns.

    There's plenty of oil in far more accessible places. California is absolutely festooned with capped wells where the politicians won't allow further production. Slant-well drilling at the coast is similarly banned. And then there's ANWR's magnificent field which was specifically set aside for drilling, but again the politicians (and the soft-headed voters who think they're saving Bambi) get in the way.

    So you're correct, that's where the oil the politicians and bureaucrats hadn't roadblocked is.
     
  22. unid macrumors regular

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  23. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #23
    sjinsjca, everything I've read figures to some three million bbl/day if all the "verboten" US areas were developed. That would be over a ten-year time span. The estimate for Alaska is not just the ten years; there would have to be a replacement for the aging Alyeska pipeline, and the overall estimated cost is above $40 billion in today's money.

    The Chevron "Jack #6" project in some 6,000 feet in the GOM tested at 6,000 bbl/day. An engineer friend of mine who's in the offshore business told me that full development would likely be fourteen wells there, at some 4,000 bbl/day each and an estimated life of twelve to fourteen years. Compare that rate of production with the likely productivity of the shut-in wells of California at five to fifty bbl/day, each.

    Folks talk about the Bakken: Poor in porosity, permeability and pressure. It's not the "light, sweet crude" which is easily pumped. Odds are, maybe 40 to 50 bbl/day per well.

    We use 20 million bbl/day in the US, importing some 13 million bbl/day at present. Our existing fields are declining, both on-land and in the GOM.

    Enough. Given the absence of any rational energy policy whether public or private, hey: We're in deep doo-doo.

    unid: Thanks. Interesting article.
     
  24. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #24
  25. yoyo5280 thread starter macrumors 68000

    yoyo5280

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    link added to original post.
    Your comments however, were not.
     

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