Brute Force Crack App?

andym172

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 24, 2003
335
3
UK
I know that there are many apps available for Windows pc's, but I was wondering if there are any for Mac (OS X)?
 

unixkid

macrumors regular
Jan 25, 2004
101
1
i would like to know too because my peecees r to slow to retrieve passwords when my family members forget them and i would like to do it on my 2.5ghz PowerMac.
 

andym172

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 24, 2003
335
3
UK
Doctor Q said:
What are you trying to accomplish?
I'm not really. I've been testing my new 2.5 G5 against my old 17" PB and was wanting to see how quickly each could crack a file.
 

DavidLeblond

macrumors 68020
Jan 6, 2004
2,198
286
Raleigh, NC
What passwords are they forgetting? If its something online, it'll probably be a lot quicker to call the service provider or click "Forgot Password?" on the website.
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 19, 2002
36,051
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Los Angeles
andym172 said:
I've been testing my new 2.5 G5 against my old 17" PB and was wanting to see how quickly each could crack a file.
If your goal is to measure their comparative speed, you can search versiontracker for "performance" and find a number of applications you might use.
 

andym172

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 24, 2003
335
3
UK
Doctor Q said:
If your goal is to measure their comparative speed, you can search versiontracker for "performance" and find a number of applications you might use.
Thanks for the link :)

The problem with these app's is that they give you no real benchmark, just numbers.

I'm just looking for an indication of how much faster the PowerMac is than the Powerbook. I've messed about with turning mp3's into AAC's in iTunes (the G5 is around 3x faster) but I was wanting to have a mess with a few more app's.
 

~Shard~

macrumors P6
Jun 4, 2003
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Nice excuses guys - my advice, don't crack Mac apps, they're worth buying. Plus, it's illegal. :p

Asking a question like that is almost as obvious as saying "How do I hide files on my computer" (porn) or "How do I burn my DVDs for back-up purposes?" (illegally copying DVDs)

There are many mays to test performance, benchmarking and comparison of systems. No need to try brute force cracking... :cool:
 

efoto

macrumors 68030
Nov 16, 2004
2,627
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Cloud 9 (-6)
Although slightly morally opposed to the idea, I still at times will *pirat.e* things from M$ because I feel as if I have spent honest money and received less than honest products. I try to purchase all third party and non-M$ stuff, but when work gets a copy of the new Office 2004 Professional and my boss says "sure, we have unlimited licenses, feel free to install it on your personal pc" I can't say I would feel all that bad....not that this happened of course :D

I know nothing, don't listen to me.
 

Doctor Q

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 19, 2002
36,051
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Los Angeles
efoto said:
I try to purchase all third party and non-M$ stuff, but when work gets a copy of the new Office 2004 Professional and my boss says "sure, we have unlimited licenses, feel free to install it on your personal pc" I can't say I would feel all that bad...
Read your license. If your PC qualifies it might be allowed a legal copy under the EULA.

Example, for Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003:
Installation and use. You may:

(a) install and use a copy of the Software on one personal computer or other device; and

(b) install an additional copy of the Software on a second, portable device for the exclusive use of the primary user of the first copy of the Software.
 

efoto

macrumors 68030
Nov 16, 2004
2,627
0
Cloud 9 (-6)
I would assume that my boss would be the one who's computer would be a valid personal install, considering he purchased it. Although, if this did work it would be quite the ironic and humerous catch to a rather silly post topic anyway.

I can see the headlines now:
"I was trying to steal from M$, but it turns out that nothing I did was wrong. All the stuff I have ever taken was completely legit!"

Read your papers kids, efoto on newstands tomorrow :D
 

Koodauw

macrumors 68040
Nov 17, 2003
3,936
165
Madison
Can someone explain a brute force attach to me?
Is that when a computer program tries you to discover your pasword by a trying a million different ones? Over and over untill it gets it right?

And if so does anyone know of any Wifi Brute Force programs? (ie to crack a wep encryption?)
 

andym172

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 24, 2003
335
3
UK
~Shard~ said:
Nice excuses guys - my advice, don't crack Mac apps, they're worth buying. Plus, it's illegal. :p
As ridiculous as it may sound, my use for it is only as I have stated :)

It's much alike ripping DVD's. A few weeks ago I learnt how to copy DVD's and in the time between now and then, I've copied one DVD (from a DVD I own) and have purchased 12 (yes, I'm a DVD Whore/Addict :D).

It's easy to assume a person is up to no good, but I can assure you that in this case my intentions are entirely legal :)
 

Mitthrawnuruodo

Moderator emeritus
Mar 10, 2004
13,595
142
Bergen, Norway
~Shard~ said:
Asking a question like that is almost as obvious as saying ... "How do I burn my DVDs for back-up purposes?" (illegally copying DVDs)
Well, here in Norway it's actually legal to copy music (CDs) and movies (DVDs) if you have obtained them legally, specified in the law as if they're bought, rented, loaned (on public libraries or your "close family and friends"). Software is excepted from this law and thus illegal to copy (ironicly in som cases even for backup - Norwegian legislation is really ****ed up, but for now I won't complain... :D).

So, if I had a more DVD-ripping friendly machine than the iBook, I would probably be very interested in ways to rip DVDs and burn them on a LaCie DVD±RW I can borrow when needed. And it would, as I said, be perfectly legal...
 

cluthz

macrumors 68040
Jun 15, 2004
3,118
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Norway
andym172 said:
I'm not really. I've been testing my new 2.5 G5 against my old 17" PB and was wanting to see how quickly each could crack a file.
If you need to test raw cpu power, download some sourcecode and start compiling...
 

kettle

macrumors 65816
what's the easiest way to duplicate my credit card just incase I snap it removing ice from my wind screen... oh and what's the easiest way to link my pBook to a cash point machine? :rolleyes: I find my pin very difficult to remember.
 

andym172

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 24, 2003
335
3
UK
kettle said:
what's the easiest way to duplicate my credit card just incase I snap it removing ice from my wind screen... oh and what's the easiest way to link my pBook to a cash point machine? :rolleyes: I find my pin very difficult to remember.
If you do find out, let me know - these are questions I've been wanting answered for a while! ;)
 

Mitthrawnuruodo

Moderator emeritus
Mar 10, 2004
13,595
142
Bergen, Norway
kettle said:
what's the easiest way to duplicate my credit card just incase I snap it removing ice from my wind screen... oh and what's the easiest way to link my pBook to a cash point machine? :rolleyes: I find my pin very difficult to remember.
Just send your credit card to me and I'll copy it for you... just ignore shipping notes with a different shipping address for a while, that's just a completely normal part of the testing process for the copy, and nothing to worry about... :D

As soon as Cash points have WiFi or Bluetooth access, I'll get back to you on that one...
 

_pb_boi

macrumors 6502
Feb 25, 2004
382
0
Nice excuses guys - my advice, don't crack Mac apps, they're worth buying. Plus, it's illegal.

Asking a question like that is almost as obvious as saying "How do I hide files on my computer" (porn) or "How do I burn my DVDs for back-up purposes?" (illegally copying DVDs)

There are many mays to test performance, benchmarking and comparison of systems. No need to try brute force cracking...
If he wants to bench it that way, let him.

Anyway, your comments are somewhat misguided. To crack a Mac app - or any app, PC or otherwise - generally involves using more than a brute force cracker like John_the_Ripper or whatever. Those crackers just throw a predetermined dictionary at the encrypted pass until its encryption matches the password.

To crack an app is generally to invalidate its time restraints or usage restraints. I believe time restraints are governed by code built into the proggie, requiring reverse engineering, not brute force cracking.

No doubt people will reply with specific examples proving me wrong, but note that im generalising - this is true for the vast majority of apps.

andy.
 

~Shard~

macrumors P6
Jun 4, 2003
18,388
42
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Koodauw said:
Can someone explain a brute force attach to me?
Since I used to be involved with these all the time, let me try to explain. I used to work at the CSE, Communications Security Establishment, the Canadian version of the NSA, so I was involved with all sorts of cool communications and "spy" stuff while I was there, and one of them involved utilizing a Cray T3E to carry out, among many other things, brute force attacks.

A BFA involves breaking a cipher by trying every possible key. Whether the brute force attack will succeed or not depends on the key length of the cipher, and also on the amount of computational power you're using. Brute force attack is impossible against the ciphers with variable-size key, such as a one-time pad cipher, but otherwise, as we always used to say, nothing is impossible - it may be infeasible, but it's not impossible. ;)

As a general rule, any cipher with a 64-bit key can be compromised with little difficulty (by an organization like ours, at least) using brute force. 128 bits is currently thought a minimum sensible key length for symmetric key algorithms, but I won't say any more about this.

So BFAs work well when dealing with symmetric situations. Sequential algorithms such as DES, 3DES, AES are "easy" to crack in this manner. When you start looking at asymmetric key algorithms though, things get more complicated and it really depends on the individual encryption algorithm. The currently breakable key length for the RSA algorithm is at least 512 bits (it has been done publicly), and recent research developments suggest that 1024 bits might be breakable in the near to medium term future. (I won't comment whether this is true or not for obvious reasons.) RSA is an excellent encryption scheme though, you can find out more about it by doing a Google search if you're curious.

Anyway, that should cover things for now. If you have any further questions, let me know. :cool:
 

_pb_boi

macrumors 6502
Feb 25, 2004
382
0
Can someone explain a brute force attach to me?
It's when you have a really BIG attachment that's SO heavy you gotta lift it with all your strength, and haul it onto your attachment box in your 'new email' screen.

Seriously though, shard has it right. What you'll most often come across with regards to people like us using a brute force cracker though is the following kinda scenario.

Say someone is sniffing around Mr. BOFH's network and finds the encrypted pass file, it's not much use in its current guise. They'll steal the encrypted pass file and store it on their own system, or else upload the brute force cracker and their favourite dictionary. The dictionary file is a text file used by the password cracker. The password cracker will encrypt all the words and nonsensical strings (think 'AAAAAAA' etc.) in the dictionary file until it finds a match with the encrypted pass in the encrypted pass file. At this point, it'll supply the user with the text equivalent of the encrypted pass, which they can then use to gain access to whatever they need access to.

Course, you need a username. Not normally so much a problem though.

andy.
 

~Shard~

macrumors P6
Jun 4, 2003
18,388
42
1123.6536.5321
andym172 said:
As ridiculous as it may sound, my use for it is only as I have stated :)

It's much alike ripping DVD's. A few weeks ago I learnt how to copy DVD's and in the time between now and then, I've copied one DVD (from a DVD I own) and have purchased 12 (yes, I'm a DVD Whore/Addict :D).

It's easy to assume a person is up to no good, but I can assure you that in this case my intentions are entirely legal :)
That's fair enough, but for every person like you out there who is doing things legitimately, there are about a hundred if not a thousand who aren't. ;)