Bully cops..

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by FrankBlack, Sep 12, 2007.

  1. FrankBlack macrumors 6502

    FrankBlack

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    Looking for Lucy Butler
    #1
    First, let me say right up front that I know that there are a lot of men and women, working as police officers, who are doing a fine, honest job. I'll take this opportunity to thank them.

    By now, some of you have surely seen this rather disturbing video of a verbal altercation between a young man who has apparently done nothing, and a St. Louis police officer.

    This is scary as hell, I think. Link to newspaper story about same.

    It's certainly not the first time I have heard or read one of these stories. At least today, we have such things as video cameras and recorders.

    I remember as a high school student, there was one town cop in particular that everyone was scared to death of. Basically, if you were young, and male, you were on this guy's ka-ka list . He was known for roughing people up, and daring them to do anything about it. A friend of mine was stopped one night, while riding his bicycle home from a part time job. He was yelled at, and threatened with arrest. For what? being a "disorderly person". He was let go, with a "don't let me catch you again!" kind of talk.

    So, what does everyone think of this St. louis situation?
     
  2. halfprep455 macrumors regular

    halfprep455

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    Maryland USA
    #2
    I think that that officer should be fired and put on probation or possibly some some jail time. Police brutality is more of a problem then people think it is. I think that this officer needs to be made an example of!
     
  3. srf4real macrumors 68030

    srf4real

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    #3
    I think the officer's supervisor should be disciplined or fired for trying to justify his wayward officer's behavior.
     
  4. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #4
    srf4real: It seems to me that the officer's supervisor did not try to justify his behavior:

     
  5. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    Terlingua, Texas
    #5
    There's roughly about a million cops/deputies, nationwide, including the clerical types. If only one percent is Bad Cop material, that's 10,000. That's a scarily large number, to me. But, 990,000 aren't Bad Cop types...

    The reason that an event of this sort is news is because it doesn't happen very often.

    This particular event wound up with a lot of publicity, so there may redress for the victim. The real problem is that there isn't enough accountability on the part of local governments, on the elected officials who appoint police chiefs who may allow or condone such behavior.

    'Rat
     
  6. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    St. Louis, MO
    #6


    Not surprised......I bet it happens a lot more here (and in other cities too for that matter) but most people just can't get it on tape, so when they say "Officer so-and-so did this" no one believes them.
     
  7. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #7
    I agree.

    It's my opinion that those in the upper echelon of public services that ocassionally come under fire are operating under the fear that if enough of these events come under scrutiny, public backlash will have them out of a job or tarred and feathered. The thinking then would be that dismissing as many incidents as possible when evidence or character can be questioned, and following that with making scapegoats of those whose guilt is undeniable, is the safest course of action -- for them mind you -- for them to take.

    The fact is, positions within the military and within the police force give an individual a measure of power over their fellow man, and can be more attractive to unsavoury types than, say, a career in needlepoint.
     
  8. mduser63 macrumors 68040

    mduser63

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    Salt Lake City, UT
    #8
    In my (admittedly anecdotal) experience (as an observer), it's significantly more than 1%.

    Exactly. Every time a cop shoots an unarmed person here (happens way more often than it should), they are put on 2 weeks paid leave (aka paid vacation) and then found justified and reinstated. Any other course of action would make the upper level people in the department look bad.
     
  9. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

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    #9
    There was a published study done by one of the Ivy League medical colleges. It was centered around police officers and their psychological profiles. I was not surprised to read what was in their findings. I cannot quote the exact numbers, so please be advised these are just what I can recall after many years.

    ~15% to ~20% of officers suffered from violent mental disorders.
    ~25% to ~33% (including the same group) suffered from 'control' problems.

    In other words, nearly 1/3 of police officers had issues with controlling others and half of them expressed it violently. This is what is being portrayed in the audio recording. The officer wants to be in total control. When even the smallest doubt of who the 'alpha dog' is, he immediately assumes a threatening position with this citizen. Notice, he is not satisfied with compliance. He comes back several times to force the citizen to acknowledge the 'alpha dog' relationship. he even goes as far as to goad the citizen into a challenge of his authority. This is one sick son of a beach. Yet, he is running loose with not only a gun, but a badge as well.

    There are tens of thousands of these crewcut psychos running loose. If you think they are keeping you safe, just do not have a breakdown after midnight.
     
  10. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    Oct 9, 2006
    #10
    I have my dealing with both good cops and bad cops over the years. Vast majority of the cops I have dealt with are good cops. I have only real had to deal with 2 cops that where rather unprofessional pricks. One by far worse than the other but both pretty much had the they where in control actions. and I will say one who board line it that one called me a dumb ass and told me to get out of his sights (mind you I kind of deserved it)

    Most cops I dealt with in traffic stops have been pretty cool yes even the ones who have given me tickets heck I even joke around with one of them who wrote me a ticket. I been with my brother when he was written a ticket by another cop and had a laugh with him. Now I gotten a lot of warning 2 for speeding and other traffic volitions. I have a written warning sitting my car right now.
    I believe very strongly a vast majority of cops out there are good and deserve our respect but there are a few bad cops out there that only give respect to because of the badge as a person I would never respect them. Most cops I highly respect the person along with the badge.
     
  11. halfprep455 macrumors regular

    halfprep455

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    Maryland USA
    #11
    I think the best way o combat police brutality is to hold the people at the top responsible. BTW, most cases of police brutality are investigated by the FBI. However, the laws do need to be more strict.
     
  12. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #12
    To be fair, a situation where an officer has gone so far to have drawn his gun would almost certainly have had to involve escalation to get past public scrutiny.

    The reality of a situation that may involve a physical altercation is as follows: if the attackers is within 8-10 meters of your person and is able-bodied, he will be able to close that distance and attack you before you are able to react, unholster your weapon and fire. That means if you are a cop, and in a situation where a potentially dangerous individual is within ~30 feet of you, if he has a concealed weapon of any sort, even a knife, and your weapon is not drawn, they are probably going to seriously injure or kill you.

    I'm certainly not downplaying incidence of unneccesary use of firearms by police officers, but I think the public has an unrealistic view of when it's reasonable for an officer to pull his gun with intent to use. Even in a holster, a gun is really only a useful self-defense tool in a situation where the potential defender has been given a moment of opportunity to recognize and prepare for danger (which kind of eliminates a firearm as a means of personal defense in most situations, but that's fairly off topic).
     
  13. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    LaLaLand, CA
    #13
    Which would be fine if we dealt with that 1%. Even if we just dealt with most of them. But when we don't, we have a problem. And just makes things harder for that other 99%.
     
  14. ErikCLDR macrumors 68000

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    Jan 14, 2007
    #14
    Go to RI. I swear they have the worst cops ever.

    In my town it seems like they make a big deal out of nothing. Mostly because I don't think anything significant really ever happens around here.
     
  15. shu82 macrumors 6502a

    shu82

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    Rocket City, AL
    #15
    It really does get better when you get older. In five years I have gone from "little snot who is going to go to jail".... to O.K. sir Ill be right back with your ticket.

    When I was younger I did do stupid things. Loitering was a hobby back then. I miss those days!

    Out in the county, some cops are so bored they drive around looking for anyone sitting in a car. They search them all just for something to do. Sometimes someone sitting in a parked car is the only thing close to "suspicious" a the cop will see all night.

    That cop was an ass, but you never let him feel any differently than the boss of the situation.
     
  16. FrankBlack thread starter macrumors 6502

    FrankBlack

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    #16
    Oh I've noticed that. I do get a kick out of cops in their 20's calling me "sir" once they spot my mostly grey hair. Oh yes, I can walk all over Best Buy, and the blue shirts leave me alone, which is the way I like it.

    Your advice is good, and I agree. Best to save any protests for your lawyer.
    As for the Bully cop from the town where I grew up, the only thing I ever heard is that he spent the last few years of his career on desk duty, after numerous complaints and a few lawsuits. But,,, there are always more, aren't there?
     

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