Buy cMBP or rMBP? Screen just shattered on 09 MBP...

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by kmj2318, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. kmj2318 macrumors 68000

    kmj2318

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Naples, FL
    #1
    I've been anticipating upgrading my mid 09 MacBook Pro with the rMBP 15" for some time now. Though I decided that I'd rather wait till the next spec bump to give me piece of mind in the wake of these screen problems.

    However, a few days ago, my iPad fell off of my bed onto the lid of my MacBook Pro and dented it to the point of breaking the screen.

    I really want the Retina but I'm worried about the scrolling lag (by the way, has it seemed to improve over the last few months?) Or I could just buy the current generation and be very confident that it's going to do what I want. Both of these options should be a big step up for me from what I currently have.

    I feel like I may regret either decision. If I get the current gen, I know I'd look longingly at the retina. If I get the retina, I'd be worried about issues popping up sometime in the future.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. ob81 macrumors 65816

    ob81

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    Virginia Beach
    #2
    I got a 15" retina and I couldn't be more happy with it. To be honest, coming from an '09, I am sure you will be happy with any of the current generation MBPs. I have an '09 imac that was my only computer. I picked up a base model 13" cMBP and was blown away. If you need a computer, go ahead and grab one. You will enjoy it.
     
  3. Arnezie macrumors 65816

    Arnezie

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    #3
    Apple stands behind there products like no other company so that shouldn't even be a consideration .
     
  4. runebinder macrumors 6502a

    runebinder

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    Location:
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    #4
    If it's the retina you want, then getting the cMBP would be a mistake. You'll have major buyers remorse because you will feel like you have settled for the 2nd best option. Also if you plan on keeping it for 3/4 years that'll hold you back from getting a retina for a long time, unless you're planning on selling after 6 months to a year in which case you can do the same with a rMBP.

    Just get what you want, if you have major issues and don't like it you can always get it exchanged within the first few weeks for a cMBP.
     
  5. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    Jul 29, 2012
    Location:
    Rialto, CA
    #5
    Depends on needs, wants, and budget.

    I got the cMBP because it meets my needs. I got the base 15" cMBP and then put in 16GB of RAM and a TB hard drive.

    Don't need a hi-res screen, the cMBP is already thin enough for me, plus I need a CD drive and an Ethernet port(college dorm). Couldn't justify the price for the high end model when the performance difference between the 2.3 and 2.6 is almost unnoticeable. Same with an extra 500MB of VRAM(I can run any game I want for on high or max settings smooth as silk so whatever)

    rMBP has the advantage of power in a thinner lighter package with a beautiful screen. It will only seem faster because of the solid state memory. All that comes at a cost. The price for a 2.3/8 GB RAM/256 SSD is the same price for a cMBP 2.6/8/750 HD.
     
  6. MikesGravity macrumors 6502

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    #6
    It won't only seem faster due to the SSD, the quad helps.

    Off topic - does cMBP stand for classic?
     
  7. TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    #7
    By "seem faster" I was comparing the cMBP to the rMBP.

    Yes, "c" stands for classic, but I personally think it should be refered to as uMBP for "unibody Macbook Pro", since when I think classic, I think the pre-unibody models.
     
  8. KPOM macrumors G5

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    Oct 23, 2010
    #8
    If you can afford it, go with the retina. You know you want it. The screen is exquisite. It is well worth the extra dollars.
     
  9. 07dodge macrumors member

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    May 31, 2012
    #9
    Just got my 15" Retina today...blown away at the screen. It's gorgeous
     
  10. samuelk0814 macrumors member

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    Feb 14, 2011
    #10
    My advice: Wait until 2014 and get a fully spec'ed 15'' rMBP.
    You'll get a Broadwell Hexta-core processor, a nVidia 850m graphics, 1,024 GB of super fast Samsung 1030 SSD, and a Sharp IZGO display featuring a resolution of 5760x3600.
    I'd say that's worth waiting two years for, don't ya think?
     
  11. MikesGravity macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Agreed
     
  12. el-John-o macrumors 65816

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    Missouri
    #12
    In the end, you could drive yourself crazy chasing the latest from Apple, but of course, something else will be right around the corner! At the 2012 WWDC Phil Schiller touted that Apple is proud to be updated and changing their entire line more often than any other manufacturer.

    Ultimately, you need to decide what your needs are. Make a list if you must. Decide what is the most important to you. For me? I decided I wanted more storage and more RAM, but simply couldn't afford to get the performance level I wanted from the rMBP, just too expensive. It's substantially less to go with 16GB of aftermarket RAM and aftermarket SSD's in the non-retina model. I decided that I would rather give up the retina display, in order to gain the performance and storage (If I went Retina, I'd need to go with a base model, or perhaps just a nudge above).

    You might be different! These threads pop up all the time but it's the same thing for everyone really, decide what it is that YOU need from your notebook, because what I need might be different than what you need. The 13" vs 15" is a classic example of that. 15" users simply cannot wrap their head around anyone wanting to buy a 13" MBP with it's performance disadvantages over the 15" model, and yet many 13" users simply cannot wrap their heads around using a bigger, heavier, less portable model, or paying $500 more for features they won't use! Point is, everyone is different with different needs! You need to figure out where YOU are.
     
  13. runebinder macrumors 6502a

    runebinder

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    #13
    I disagree as Unibody refers to the fact that the chassis is milled from a solid block of aluminium, this also applies to the retina so not applicable as a distinction.
     
  14. el-John-o macrumors 65816

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    Nov 29, 2010
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    Missouri
    #14
    Why not just call one the retina, and the other the 'MacBook Pro'. That's what Apple calls them right?

    Either way they are both Macbook Pros, just seems easier to call one retina, and just leave one vanilla.
     
  15. TechZeke, Jan 4, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013

    TechZeke macrumors 68020

    TechZeke

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    Jul 29, 2012
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    Rialto, CA
    #15
    Then why on EVERY label I've seen that shows machine compatibility(Like accessories), the cMBP is always refered to as "Unibody Macbook Pro" and the rMBP is always refered to as "Macbook Pro with Retina Display" or "Retina Macbook Pro"?(With both on the SAME label I might add)

    The point is, it's about what defines the product. rMBP is defined by Retina, which is why it as an "r" in front of it. The cMBP is defined by being unibody, so uMBP would be more appropriate.

    Classic would be more appropriate for the original MBP, which is what "classic" implies.

    I'm willing to bet that when you first read my sig specs, when you saw "Unibody MBP" that you already knew it was a cMBP without seeing the fact that it has a HDD, which a rMBP can't have.
     
  16. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #16
    I love my rmbp, but is configuration something that you can use, i.e., no optical drive no ethernet?
     
  17. runebinder macrumors 6502a

    runebinder

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    #17
    Until the Retina came out there had been 2 different types of MacBook Pros, the older versions and then the Unibody, and had been like that for 4 years hence why most accessory places refer to it as the Unibody. When something new comes out and you are going to use a term to define one with the other you go for something that is different, so Retina works to define that model as the standard units do not have a retina screen.

    Unibody does not work as a term to define them from the retinas only the older MacBook Pros as both the standard and retina have a unibody chassis, so using the term unibody does not define any difference between the 2 units. It's a case of using the English language correctly.
     
  18. Liquinn Suspended

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    #18
    I'd buy the classic MBP right now if I was you... Apple could remove the cMBP's from the line-up with Haswell.
     
  19. HishamAkhtar macrumors 6502a

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    Oct 22, 2011
    #19
    Technically the rMBP is also unibody :)
     
  20. KPOM macrumors G5

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    Oct 23, 2010
    #20
    The Ethernet adapter is $29. I'm not sure why people make such a fuss about the lack of an Ethernet port. Yes it is a little cheap of Apple not to throw in the adapter on a $2199 computer (or even the $1699 13" model) but it isn't a deal breaker.

    As for the optical drive, I still have the one that I purchased with my original MacBook Air nearly 5 years ago. Back then I used it a lot more, but lately it's hardly ever, even when I get a new Mac. Migration Assistant copies over all my Mac applications, and Winclone is back, which takes care of my Windows installation.
     
  21. kmj2318 thread starter macrumors 68000

    kmj2318

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Naples, FL
    #21
    Oh, I always thought that it meant Current Gen Macbook Pro, as Apple referred to it in the keynote.

    ----------

    Anyway, I ended up getting the 15" Retina yesterday. Everything about it is amazing, except for the UI lag. It's really disappointing to me. I'm considering taking it back and just buying a base 13" cMBP, and maybe get a Retina sometime in the future. I'm wowed by everything else though, it's a hard decision. :(
     
  22. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #22
    Where are you noticing the UI lag? I recently replaced a lost 2012 MacBook Air with a 13" rMBP, and even with nearly 4 times the pixels to push and the same HD 4000 graphics processor I'm not noticing anything significant. It feels about as fast as my 2012 Air, which is what I was expecting. I'd have thought that from a 2009 MBP it would be even less noticeable. Have you downloaded all the software updates? I thought that 10.8.2 resolved most of the lag that AnandTech and others observed.

    If you decide to take it back, I'd consider an upgraded 13" Air over the 13" cMBP. It would give you the same thinness, etc. that you like in the rMBP, and would have comparable overall performance to a base 13" cMBP upgraded with an SSD.
     
  23. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Boston
    #23
    All things being equal I have the rMBP and the adapter and I really don't like how it works The thunderbolt adapter uses friction and so it can come out a lot easier then if the ethernet cable plugged directly into the computer.

    I was just making a list of significant differences between the cMBP and the rMBP. Having a builtin port is an advantage over needing an adapter.
     
  24. kmj2318 thread starter macrumors 68000

    kmj2318

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Naples, FL
    #24
    Scrolling in mail, some websites, swiping up or down to view mission control or expose, scrolling through iTunes library and opening albums. It's definitely useable but the fact that it happens every once in a while is upsetting considering it doesn't happen on my 09 MBP. I do notice improvements when I uncheck automatic graphics switching. I'm wondering if there's any fixes I could try out.
     
  25. duervo macrumors 68000

    duervo

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    #25

    I actually prefer the TB adapter over a traditional Ethernet cable/port, but only for the same reason why I like the MagSafe technology over traditional power cables in laptops.

    You trip over the cable for some reason, and there's less risk of damage to the TB port, or the whole system to be yanked off the desk or table to come crashing down onto the floor if were connected with a traditional Ethernet cable and built-in RJ45 port. With the TB adapter, the adapter just gets yanked out of the port, because it's not locked in like it would be in the built-in port.
     

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