California back on fire again

stylinexpat

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Original poster
Mar 6, 2009
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duffman9000

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Sep 7, 2003
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Deep in the Depths of CA
The Santa Ana winds were pretty strong a couple of days ago. Not as strong as earlier in the year where a tree branch was blown off in my back yard. Those winds are helping fuel the fires.
 
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stylinexpat

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The Santa Ana winds were pretty strong a couple of days ago. Not as strong as earlier in the year where a tree branch was blown off in my back yard. Those winds are helping fuel the fires.
You are right but for a fire to occur something needs to be present that burns and spreads easily..
 

duffman9000

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Sep 7, 2003
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Deep in the Depths of CA
You mean the dry, ready to burn vegetation? It was a hot summer. I don't remember if it was hotter this year or last. We need controlled burns constantly now. We are getting ashy air one way or another.
 

ThisBougieLife

macrumors 68020
Jan 21, 2016
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SF Bay Area, California
Can't believe there are fires this bad in December. You think of it as a summer issue, but the "fire season" seems to be perennial now. A huge swath of Wine Country burned in October (providing weeks of horrible air quality here in the Bay), and most of the fires were thought to have been sparked by PG&E-owned power-lines. It will be interesting when the causes of these SoCal fires are discovered. Despite the above-average amount of rain we received in the winter of 2016/2017, a Mediterranean climate naturally dries out in the summer significantly and becomes prone to wildfires (South Australia has the same climate and is similarly prone). The desert winds of course just make SoCal even more of a tinderbox.
 
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bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
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Nah... it couldn't be due to that boogieman :D
Jesus, if you're still up there and care, send rain please!
It isn't that hard, guys! I mean, geez!

You live right next to an ocean! Couldn't someone at NASA or Northrup Grumman simply engineer a 250,000 bucket, dip it in the water, take it up to 10000ft MSL and just dump it over the fire, and repeat until the fire is out! :p

Yes, that is sarcasm.

Meanwhile we're getting a bit of a chill up here in NorCal, and we can see snow on Donner Pass from here in Sacramento. And I swear that even though we are some 300 miles from the basin, we felt every single bit of those 50mph Santa Ana winds up here! It made both a brutal takeoff from Vegas and landing here. I have a redwood tree in my front yard, and I'm having to take a chainsaw to a few of the branches that fell off. It's probably a good 750ft - 1000ft tall tree, so I'm glad it hit the lawn instead of the house.

BL.
 
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MadeTheSwitch

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Apr 20, 2009
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You mean the dry, ready to burn vegetation? It was a hot summer. I don't remember if it was hotter this year or last. We need controlled burns constantly now. We are getting ashy air one way or another.
We need to pour cement over entire hillsides near neighborhoods, paint it some nice shade of green and be done with it. It's the only thing I can think of to stop this constant problem which is too reoccurring, too hard to fight with our primitive little pea shooter methods, and too expensive and heartbreaking in terms of money, lives and memories.

Seriously need an out of the box idea. What we are doing now isn't working and is too ineffective.
 
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LIVEFRMNYC

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Oct 27, 2009
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I read this is due to higher than usual precipitation, allowing more vegetation to grow, which dries up and becomes combustible.
 
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weckart

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Nov 7, 2004
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I have a redwood tree in my front yard, and I'm having to take a chainsaw to a few of the branches that fell off. It's probably a good 750ft - 1000ft tall tree, so I'm glad it hit the lawn instead of the house.
I can't imagine having a 300m tall tree in my front garden. You'll never want for firewood.
 

lowendlinux

macrumors 603
Sep 24, 2014
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North Country (way upstate NY)
We need to pour cement over entire hillsides near neighborhoods, paint it some nice shade of green and be done with it. It's the only thing I can think of to stop this constant problem which is too reoccurring, too hard to fight with our primitive little pea shooter methods, and too expensive and heartbreaking in terms of money, lives and memories.

Seriously need an out of the box idea. What we are doing now isn't working and is too ineffective.
Lets give California back to Mexico then it's their problem :D
 

Septembersrain

Contributor
Dec 14, 2013
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Texas
This makes me feel very sad because in a lot of cities, housing is already hard to find/afford.

The fires must disrupt these peoples lives from their homes to the commute to work, the air quality, the fear of losing everything...

Democrat, Republican, Independent, etc no matter who you are... Watching this is horrifying.
 

stylinexpat

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Mar 6, 2009
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Have not had the chance to take and post pictures but will do so soon.
 

bradl

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Jun 16, 2008
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How many Of you are in the North Bay area?
Close to north bay, but not in it. I'm about 90 from it, in Sacramento. But our air quality was horrible with the Napa, Sonoma, and Butte fires (though by comparison, you could call it "fresh air" compared to New Delhi).

The closest the fires got to us was Fairfield, which is 35 miles from us. They were under voluntary evacuation. Had it become worse, everyone on this side of the country would either have been crying or screaming for joy, depending on your tastes, as the Budweiser factory/plant is here, next to the Jelly Belly factory.

BL.
 

DrewDaHilp1

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Mar 29, 2009
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All Your Memes Are Belong to US
Close to north bay, but not in it. I'm about 90 from it, in Sacramento. But our air quality was horrible with the Napa, Sonoma, and Butte fires (though by comparison, you could call it "fresh air" compared to New Delhi).

The closest the fires got to us was Fairfield, which is 35 miles from us. They were under voluntary evacuation. Had it become worse, everyone on this side of the country would either have been crying or screaming for joy, depending on your tastes, as the Budweiser factory/plant is here, next to the Jelly Belly factory.

BL.
I was just wondering I’m in the North Bay Area for work. I know when the fires hit Santa Rosa the smoke was pretty bad.
 

bradl

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Jun 16, 2008
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I was just wondering I’m in the North Bay Area for work. I know when the fires hit Santa Rosa the smoke was pretty bad.
Yeah.. where you're at, you'd get it from both sides (no pun intended). You had the Napa, Santa Rosa, and Sonoma fires to the north, and then the Santa Cruz and Felton fires to the south. When that happens, you'd think your best choice of action would be to jump in the bay to escape the fire, but then you'd have to worry about the barges ramming into the Bay Bridge! :eek::oops:

BL.
 

ThisBougieLife

macrumors 68020
Jan 21, 2016
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SF Bay Area, California
Some disturbing facts:

The Thomas Fire was the 19th largest wildfire in California history a couple days ago; it is now the 5th. Of the Top 5 largest wildfires in California history, all occurred in the 21st century.

The most destructive fire in California history was the Tubbs Fire, which burned just two months ago.

Of the 20 most destructive fires in California history, none were determined to have been caused by lightning (though the exact cause of some of them has never been determined).

The Thomas Fire is currently threatening Carpinteria and the "American Riviera" region of Santa Barbara County. It is expected to get worse over the next few days.
 
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