California launches test of per-mile road use fee for drivers

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Jul 11, 2016.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #1
    http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/transportation/back-seat-driver/article88833572.html
    I hate this state sometimes
     
  2. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #2
    this is not the first pilot for this concept. This has been done numerous times before fyi
     
  3. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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    #3
    well How you going to pay for the roads? sure can't get the money out of the rock that is congress.
     
  4. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #4
    Seeing as the trucking industry damages the road to the tune over over 4,000:1, I'd say the trucking industry can actually pay their fair share.

    Or better yet, lets build some ****ing rail and get these trucks off the road for everything but the "last mile".
     
  5. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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  6. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #6
    Well in California you only go about a mile before you hit a dead stop.
     
  7. BoxerGT2.5 macrumors 68000

    BoxerGT2.5

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    #7
    Someone in Illinois wanted to do this because the state is so mismanaged its beyond ridiculous and we've already taxed a pack of cigarettes to the point some people need to fill out a credit application. Their pack a day habit is more expensive than their subsidized ACA premium.
     
  8. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #8
    Have you seen the prices here? The tax just because of smog and emissions are high enough as is!

    NOT ONE MORE CENT PER GALLON. :p

    Seriously, I can see why the Assemblyman is wanting to do this. The roads here are horrible. I've driven on turnpikes in and outside of California that were taken care of better than the county, state, and interstate highways here. In the 12 years I've been here I've gone through 2 full sets of tires, while by comparison, I drove into this state from Nebraska, through Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada (drove from Vegas up to Reno and then over; don't go that way unless you like 2-lanes in the desert all the way with only 3 places to stop for gas) on the same set of tires I had when I bought that car.

    Very little maintenance of the roads (I've had at least 8 different times a tire had to be patched from nails in the tread), years of construction that when finished is already straining to meet exceeded capacity, and very little to no relief from any mass transit (BART is great for the Bay area, but that doesn't help for anything in any other metro area).

    By comparison, I've driven on 2 different non-Interstate highway turnpikes in Oklahoma, and they were smooth and well kept. I-40 on the other hand was horrible getting back into Oklahoma City.

    I really don't know what the gas tax here is paying for, because we really aren't seeing the results of it on any major highway and the way growth is now, it isn't going to get any better.

    BL.
     
  9. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #9
    Rails would never work for time sensitive products like fruits and vegetables. All those fruits and veggies grown by California farmers would rot in their fields. Prices of fruits and veggies in states with zero agricultural capabilities would skyrocket. If not for the produce industry in California, I doubt any trucker would bother going to the state. Ridiculously high diesel prices, no more than 5 minutes idling (no sleeping in the sleeper cab), low rates for loads going into California (barely enough to cover the costs). Produce loads going out of California is a veritable gold mine (2x - 3x the rates going in).
     
  10. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #10
    Fruit doesn't go bad that quickly. Trains can easily do 70mph just like trucks.
     
  11. impulse462 macrumors 68000

    impulse462

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    #11
    Dude, BART is so weird sometimes. Most times when I travel cross-bay, when I pass MacArthur, we're moving slower than cars on either side of us I just lose my **** sometimes. Better than having to pay for parking in SF though.
     
  12. Robisan, Jul 11, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2016

    Robisan macrumors 6502

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    #12
    So stupid. There's already a per-mile tax - it's called the gas tax. Driving miles requires gas. The more miles you drive, the more gas you buy. So those who drive more also pay more tax. Just raise the damn gas tax.

    ...adding, or don't raise the gas tax, let the roads rot and drivers will face greater road-damage-related repair bills. Pay now or pay later. Or be blindly stupid.
     
  13. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #13
    Right, because before trucks and freeways were invented fruits or vegetables were never, ever shipped via rail in the US...

    [​IMG]
     
  14. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #14
    I was in that freight car over the weekend! The Sacramento Railroad Museum is a really cool place, especially since I can say that I've been to both ends of the Union Pacific Railroad (it started in Omaha/Council Bluffs and ends in Sacramento).

    --- Post Merged, Jul 11, 2016 ---
    Guess that's where I'm lucky. Unless I absolutely need the car in the city, I park at Mare Island in Vallejo and take the ferry in. Once you pass the Carquinez Bridge, it all goes teets up.

    BL.
     
  15. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #15
    I'b be all all over adding about $3 a gallon tax on gas after we get our public transportation figured out
     
  16. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    USA
    #16
    Why? The State, as much an individual person as a corporation is and for largely the same reasons just different terminology, is free to do what it wants? Just don't go there to use the roads. Or are people only now upset because someone else's freedom to do something finally encroached on some peoples' ability to be free?
    --- Post Merged, Jul 11, 2016 ---
    And either which way the government gets blamed with the whiners wearing blinders because only so many factors are allowed despite a lot more than those being just as real.
     
  17. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #17
    It has nothing to do with travel time. No one would let a cargo carrying train leave until EVERY container has cleared the check list. Trains can be over 100 cars long (I've counted while waiting at a RR crossing:(). Some of that stuff will sit on the rails for days even weeks. The average time it takes a product to go from warehouse to store via train is about a month, whereas it averages only 2 days by truck.

    A grocer ain't gonna pay for product with a 1-2 day shelf life if they can get the same thing that lasts weeks.
     
  18. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #18

    Well, I live in the Boston area, so I feel you on the terrible roads. I've replaced 2 tires and a rim just within the last 2 winters. I'd gladly pay a few extra cents a gallon if they could fix some of these roads.

    Reminds me of these meme:

    [​IMG]
     
  19. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

    DrewDaHilp1

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    #19
    Just wait until smart cars are standard and the government limits how much you are allowed to travel.
     
  20. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #20
    I don't think anyone will limit travel distances, but will instead try to create "usage" fees. The gas tax is essentially a usage fee, but it doesn't work for people using electric cars.

    However, it will be very hard to implement a distance system without impinging on the right to travel.
     
  21. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #21
    so those with ev's or high mpg vehicles should pay less even though the strain on the road is the same?
    --- Post Merged, Jul 11, 2016 ---
    You see the flaw with your logic here right?
     
  22. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #22
    if YOU want to buy a gas guzzler that gets 7-10 MPG that is YOUR problem.
     
  23. Robisan macrumors 6502

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    Jan 19, 2014
    #23
    Umm, no. Ev's and high mpg vehicles tend to be much lighter weight and damage roads much less than heavy vehicles with wider-footprint tires, which impart more friction/weight on the pavement when accelerating or braking.

    ...also, too, there's a social interest in having the tax structure incentivize high mpg vehicles.
     
  24. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #24
    As long as they charge by weight as well, the trucks are the ones ripping up the roads.
     
  25. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #25
    Um, yes. For example, a hybrid SUV weighs more than my little gas car and that hybrid suv has better gas mileage. Might wan't to rethink your logic....again
    --- Post Merged, Jul 11, 2016 ---
    If the issue is taxing for maintenance, then it needs to be a function of vehicle weight and mileage driven. Fuel efficiency is not an appropriate model for the future
     

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