Campaigning = Big Business, it's a Done Deal

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by whoknows87, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. whoknows87 macrumors 6502a

    whoknows87

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Location:
    S.Florida
    #1
    is this this thing Over? it doesn't look like Romney will break the 270, there is no easy or even a difficult path for him to even get close, Based on several polls now and what states are considered toss ups and which ones we know are going to either Dems/Rep, my take on things is that News channels are obviously in the business of keeping folks glued to the TV screen , they will make this election look close, it was a week or 2 ago, but not anymore.........

    my 2 cents
     
  2. citizenzen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #2
    Anybody who watches Rachel Maddow (like me) has heard her express that cynical opinion for many, many weeks. I personally don't wish to believe that the networks purposefully twist the facts in order to keep viewers attention, though I make an exception for Fox News, with their relentless conservative spin.

    However, if there are any smoking guns out there: memos to producers to fudge data or twist story lines, etc., I'd welcome the opportunity to examine it.
     
  3. NickZac macrumors 68000

    NickZac

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    #3
    It's huge business. All main candidates have been "bought and paid for", and news viewership spikes, even more so when dirt gets dug up. This election will be close to the final hour...even if it really isn't. If 'polls' showed "Obama or Romeny to win with 90% of the vote" or "yup folks, this one is a throwaway", then who would watch the news? Who would even be here?
     
  4. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    #4

    This isn't a football game, even though the mainstream press likes to talk about it that way. In a close election, the outcome is determined by who can get out the vote. One of the reasons that the far right 20% is disproportionately influential is that they have been able to get out the vote.

    http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/06/understanding-and-misunderstanding-the-enthusiasm-gap/
     

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