Can I sell Aperture 2 if I bought the upgraded version of A3

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by BryanSchmiedele, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. BryanSchmiedele macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Location:
    Overland Park, KS
    #1
    I paid full retail for Aperture 2. When A3 came out I bought the upgraded version (*I think*). I have A3 on my computer. The serial number on A3 is totally different than the one for A2.

    Can I sell A2?
     
  2. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

    Staff Member

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    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
    #2
    I think you cannot without breaking the EULA. Upgrade license means that you must own the previous license as that's the whole point of of it. Otherwise everyone would buy the upgrade as it's cheaper.

    You can probably sell it just fine and you won't face any issues but it may not be the right thing to do
     
  3. Phil A. Moderator

    Phil A.

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    Shropshire, UK
    #3
    I don't know if it's changed with Aperture 3, but when I upgraded to Aperture 2 from Aperture 1, Aperture recognised that it was an upgrade version serial number: When I upgraded my machine and installed Aperture 2, I was prompted for the Aperture 1 Serial number after putting in the Aperture 2 serial number during installation
    This means you may need to keep the A2 serial number in case you ever need to re-install. Also, as Hellhammer has also mentioned, it's in breach of the Aperture EULA to sell the Aperture version you have upgraded from
     
  4. BryanSchmiedele thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Location:
    Overland Park, KS
    #4
    Thanks for the information

    This makes sense to me.

    If I paid for the upgraded version then I shouldn't (ethically) sell the A2 version - and I might need the serial number and/or disk anyway.

    I bought MS Office 11 and they charged full price - there was no upgrade path so I did sell my older version of that software.

    You know, Apple has I think the most reasonable software licensing policies of the major software makers. The price of their software is not so outrageous that you give people and incentive to steal, they only put really difficult copy protection on their Pro apps, etc.

    I'll just keep the software around.

    Thanks.
     
  5. YMark macrumors 6502a

    YMark

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    Nov 7, 2008
    Location:
    Arizona
    #5
    Very true, but remember software is just one revenue stream for Apple. Software is MS's (and other "software makers") bread and butter.
     
  6. coochiekuta macrumors 6502

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    Nov 6, 2010
    Location:
    here and there
    #6
    upgrade versions are presented at lower cost because you are suppose to retire your older version for the newer one. meaning you wont be using the old versions license key. if you were to sell the discs and not the key, that would be fine. however not many would want the discs without the key.

    i would like to comment that software is not marked up. theres a lot that goes into development, marketing, etc.
     
  7. YMark macrumors 6502a

    YMark

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Location:
    Arizona
    #7
    Software is not marked up? What world are you in? Yes, there is a lot that goes into development, marketing, etc. But software is a cash cow for a lot of companies. That is their BUSINESS.

    Do you know that the latest Call of Duty made $360 million the first day it went on sale?
     
  8. coochiekuta macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Location:
    here and there
    #8
    how much did it cost to develop? how much went into marketing? how much for production? localizing?

    they make a profit on their product yeah, whats your point? anyway, call of duty sold for the same amount as the avg game. it was not marked up.
     
  9. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #9
    What we have here is a failure to communicate.

    markup |ˈmärˌkəp|
    noun
    1. the amount added to the price of goods to cover overhead and profit.

    "Markup" doesn't mean "sell for an outlandish price"
     

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