Can mass produced food ever be produced properly?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by LIVEFRMNYC, Jan 23, 2016.

  1. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #1
    I think there is just too many people in this country and the world to do things properly. Any food that's being mass produced has corners cut on production. Even fruits and veggies are modified.

    And then there is corn. Would a large portion of American and the world's population be in trouble without it?
    I don't see the fastfood or package food business being so cheap and prospering without it.

    These are just my speculations and thoughts based on very little knowledge about it. Just something I thought about after watching the video below. I don't think chickens can be consumed on such a large and quick scale doing it the right way.

     
  2. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

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    #2
    Should I have noticed the 'breaking news' feed as seemingly less important than how farmers treat chickens? Of course, they each deserve their discussions, just saying that it looked odd.
     
  3. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #3
    Even worrying for vegetarians, as the most recent listeria outbreak was connected to pre-packaged salads.
     
  4. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #4
    More and more of my family are becoming vegetarians or almost-vegetarians, and yes even at that we skip the packaged produce combos marketed as time savers or convenient mixes of stuff one might not want to buy big lots of separately. I shun those and slice or chop my own from the whole veggie. Even pre-washed romaine gets a 60-second soak in vinegar-water as a superstitious nod to wondering where the thing wandered between harvest and supermarket. I just hate being so paranoid but they say immune system declines with age. So far, so good. Must be because my kitchen floor you could grow carrots in some times...
     
  5. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    In no order:

    Ever since some dope grafted one leaf onto another, the age of genetic modification was born. That's okay. Cutting corners is where the problems begin, and assuming those doing that actively know every single outcome of what is about to be done. Being human, that is not the case. Stuff happens. There is no tinfoil hat conspiracy theory here.

    Number of people and how things are done do not correlate by default as not doing things "properly".

    Freedom allows "properly" to be any number of things. But that word tends to be used in so many ways the original meaning is long lost to the masses and to the ages...

    Anyone cutting corners is just doing a disservice and insult to everyone, from customers to workers and even to their own selves. But regulations hurt the economy and cutting corners help it. Now replace "economy" with "selfish profiteering at customer and worker expense" and the issue starts to look more accurate.

    People who say there are too many people, when followed up with a blisteringly obvious question, tend to suddenly actively discount the issue, which only proves how wrong they are because they don't want to be a part of the solution.

    The word is also "vegetables", as most people have the mentality greater than a kindergartner. Though mass production companies are more often going to dumb down the audience and customer base with the slick, hip variants of words now using two or fewer syllables because nobody can say "vegetable" anymore without going to the electric chair?

    Maybe more people can get the time to cook for themselves and not rely on being lazy and spending far more for fast food slop being made for them? If couples have to work multiple jobs to put food on their families' tables, there's so little time left...

    Also, why should only companies prosper when it's the actual workers doing the work for a pittance that don't get to prosper? Why are people believing that a three decade old economic paradigm, voodoo economics (as George HW Bush called it in 1981, look it up), will eventually work? How long will it take for profits to trickle down, especially after the last recovery where every media center has all but screamed how all the profits went to the top and the bottom struggle more than ever? Trickle down is an epic fail, writing as if it is the only way to run a society no longer makes sense.

    But all praise the magical corn god, since thinking like it's 1400AD is more evolved than 2000AD. Especially when living conditions and circumstances don't even begin to match 1400, slipping backwards into the dark ages is just the wrong thing TO do...

    Americans already eat 4x more meat than they should. There's a hint. Too much corn from the groovy corn goddess there doesn't make for a balanced diet, either. And most fast food is low on vegetables but big on corn junk. Or corn mixed with sawdust, if they could manage to get rid of enough safety regulations.

    Also look up how meat and milk industries are subsidized by taxpayers whereas vegetables are not. For a free market where government involvement is bad, the fact more than one penny is spent propping up a system that claims to hate it is mind-boggling to say the least...
    --- Post Merged, Jan 24, 2016 ---
    On the plus side, anyone can die of a heart attack long before the immune system starts to dither... ??
     
  6. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #6
    This has at times been my excuse to pick up off the reasonably clean kitchen floor a piece of toast as long as it landed butter and jam side up. :eek:
     
  7. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #7
    The Five Second Rule is scientifically sound.
     
  8. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #8
    I sure to God hope so :)
     
  9. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #9
    You're not dead yet, are you?

    I know I'm not. Ergo...
     
  10. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #10
    Actually I was referring to something I dropped and ate this morning, so... it remains to be seen if I'm an outlier or just another data point supporting reliance on 5-sec rule. ;)

    I do think more about things I used to buy with abandon and toss into salads or stir fries, and one of those things is sprouts. Anyone here sprout their own and is that any safer?
     
  11. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    #11
    I never said there was some tinfoil hat conspiracy. The issue is, what these companies are suggesting they are doing vs what they are actually doing and what the consumers are expecting.


    So you're saying that we can actually have enough REAL Free Range Chickens to produce for this entire country?


    Pretty sure anyone could tell what I meant by "properly". And in this case properly meaning as suggested on the label.




    So you have the solutions, let's here it.


    Actually, the dictionary validates Veggie as an actually word. So please, no need for the insults and nitpicking.


    That I agree with to a certain extent. Chicken, meat, and etc, that people buy and cook for themselves still fall under the same category of food found at fastfood. It's not like most populated places have a live poultry place near them. And even the live poultry places I've been to in America is not suffice of quality or quantity.




    I agree, but that's a completely differ topic all together.



    Yes, American's have a real problem with overeating. But even China is getting fatter with it's recent boom. Seem like the choice of what you eat plays a role. KFC is doing extremely well in China.
     
  12. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #12
    You're right that without corn, it might be difficult to supply enough other grains to support human reliance on grains as a direct source of nutrition. Or at least difficult to make the switch quickly.

    On the other hand, problems with corn are myriad and some of them suggesst reliance on corn as a food directly used to meet human nutrition is already a dicey matter.

    First of all corn is a major commodity in global markets. The traders don't give a damn what the endpoint of a bunch of corn is since most are not going to take delivery anyway, and the same bushel of corn changes hands like a hot potato a million times every day. So it's fine if it all turns into ethanol. Or, cattle feed. So if you happen to like cornflakes for breakfast, too bad for you. Perhaps the guy who actually takes delivery of today's corn "hot potato" wants to corner the market in ethanol.

    Second, lack of diversity of seed corn, thanks to popularity of Monsanto's GM corn, is becoming a global problem. If what's generally available suddenly falls to an opportunistic predator, the planet has little time to switch to a variant kind of corn. Related issues are toxic agrochemicals such as the non-selective, systemic herbicide glycophase, used to protect the corn that Monsanto sells. Some research at the WHO reported that about 65% of people with otherwise unexplained kidney disease in some agricultural areas of Central America, India and Sri Lanka have compounds in their blood related to bonding of glycophase with heavy metals in drinking water. Monsanto has denied any relationship of their products with such illness.

    Third, corn bought for feeding to cattle (or swine, turkeys etc) is problematic because the use is inefficient compared to conversion to directly corn-based food products, and in the case of "finishing" beef, makes the animals fatter and less healthful (if more tasty) as food. In addition and as a parallel inefficiency, the animals are not solely fed corn and there is a requirement for use of grazing lands. Feedlot operations using corn and other grains along with hay are also problematic for generating much more waste per unit of space than on grazing lands, so that special care must be taken not to contaminate local waterways.

    Fourth, as if all that weren't enough, corn is commonly now converted to the high fructose corn syrup used in commercial food production; it's cheaper and easier to manage in recipe processing than is crystalline sugar. There is still debate as to whether HFCS is less healthful than other sweeteners. Opponents of its use point to studies suggesting that metabolism of HFCS increaes risk of obesity and diabetes. The corn industry objects to such conclusions and has attempted to get approval of labels like "natural" and "corn sugar" approved for ingredient lists and marketing, but so far the FDA still requires "high fructose corn syrup" to be specified on labels.
     
  13. lowendlinux, Jan 24, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016

    lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #13
    This will sound all haughty but it's not intended to be that way but here it goes none the less:

    Yes I grow my own because I want to teach my daughter how to do stuff and some of that stuff is gardening so we have a rather large garden that she maintains thanks to the power of google. Some of the stuff she grows we pick and eat some we can either way she gets fresh air and an understanding of the labor it takes to make what she eats happen.

    I buy meat from the butcher who get's their livestock from the farm that's 600 yds back and 150 yds to the left of my back porch. She understands that what she eats costs the life of those animals she sees every day on the way to school.

    I buy my eggs from the farmer across the street she can see the chickens every day and has names for all of them.

    In the end we are and she is from the country and has respect for, and has put in a bit of labor, for the things she and we eat. That doesn't mean she doesn't like chips and the like but she does understand the distinction between what is real and what isn't and it all started with me growing spices in the balcony.
     
  14. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #14
    Your daughter is lucky to have such mentoring. I suspect a lot of city kids think that chocolate milk originates in a bottle the same as soda, and who know what they think about chicken nuggets.

    I don't grow as much stuff as I used to because of the short growing season, and the amazing effort it takes to get something like eggplant without tenting it against the too-cool night temperatures in the hills. But vegetables that mature in 60-90 days and that can take a joke or aren't too much trouble to throw a cover over in August sometimes, I continue to grow every year so far. Almost time for seed catalogs... :)
     
  15. Tech198, Jan 26, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2016

    Tech198 macrumors G4

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    #15
    Yum,, that looks good.

    Now we have "farmers whistle-blowers too " ? It's getting to be a crowded market.
     
  16. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #16
    You should really consider getting/building a greenhouse and growing all year, if you have the room!
     
  17. LizKat macrumors 68040

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    #17
    Well I do have a walk-in coldframe so that helps with giving some things a leg up before spring, and keeping some herbs and salad things going well past first frosts if i take the trouble to pot them up and move them from the main garden. As far as heating the coldframe or actually getting a greenhouse, I'll let the neighbors continue to do that and buy up whatever are their leftovers... :)
     
  18. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #18
    Honestly we probably need to eat less meat. I've been doing that.
     
  19. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

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    #19
    Diet is only just barely behind religion and politics on the list of things people are inclined to become militant and self-righteous about.

    Humans have spent the last 50,000 years trying to find ways to not starve to death. Conversely, we have barely 50 years of experience dealing with the opposite problem of obesity on a large scale.
     

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