Cars and Global Warming Poll

Does your vehicle get equal to or over 30 MPG

  • 1 vehicle get over or equal to 30MPG City/HWY combined.

    Votes: 11 18.3%
  • 1 vehicle get under 30MPG City/HWY combined

    Votes: 12 20.0%
  • 2 vehicles, 1 over 30MPG City/HWY combined, one under.

    Votes: 8 13.3%
  • 2 vehicles, both over or equal to 30MPG City/HWY combined

    Votes: 11 18.3%
  • 2 vehicles, both under 30MPG City/HWY combined.

    Votes: 9 15.0%
  • Have more than 2 vehicles - post your mileage in the thread

    Votes: 3 5.0%
  • Other - I walk, bike, or other to work.

    Votes: 6 10.0%

  • Total voters
    60

tshrimp

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 30, 2012
366
2,658
I know most people on this forum are in the thought that human beings are causing global warming.

As many of you might already know I am of the thought process that the climate goes in cycles and we have minimal effects.

I am going to put some trust that most of you will be honest here, but how many of you drive a car gets over 30 MPG City/Hwy combined.

I am NOT talking about what Consumer Reports (I get better than they say) or a web site says your car gets, but what you get by doing the math (not the lie-o-meter on your cars computer)

I am just wondering how many of us walk the walk. I have 2 vehicles.

17MPG
26MPG
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
My 1996 Toyota Corolla get almost exactly 30 mpg combined.

When I can afford a new car, I will certainly find better.
 

jnpy!$4g3cwk

macrumors 65816
Feb 11, 2010
1,100
1,293
When I drive the hybrid, I get 48 MPG. Others who drive it get about 43-45. Even in a hybrid, it pays not to tailgate. ;)
 

zin

macrumors 6502
May 5, 2010
488
6,439
United Kingdom
Looking at this poll and thread as a British person, and given the cars that are on sale today, I find these MPG numbers staggeringly low. Are these typical by American standards?
 

jnpy!$4g3cwk

macrumors 65816
Feb 11, 2010
1,100
1,293
Looking at this poll and thread as a British person, and given the cars that are on sale today, I find these MPG numbers staggeringly low. Are these typical by American standards?
What are you comparing it to, and, for what purpose? For myself, a car that can't carry five adults, three of which are over 6', wouldn't be that useful. What MPG do you get?
 

tshrimp

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 30, 2012
366
2,658
Looking at this poll and thread as a British person, and given the cars that are on sale today, I find these MPG numbers staggeringly low. Are these typical by American standards?
This is city/hwy combined. You probably caught that, but my cars get 25 for one and 31 for the other on the why, but the city drinks the gas)

Also a US gallon is a little less than an imperial gallon.

And yes 30 MPG for a US car (City/HWY combined) is very good. Most do get over 30 MPG on the hwy, but in the city they drink gas. Also cars in the US are typically larger then the UK I think. It is not uncommon to have a vehicle that can carry 8. There are some very large families that need these larger SUVs.

Also the US has been very slow in adopting diesel. Ford had it in an Escort in the 1980s and it had great gas mileage. Most diesels have been from VW I think. Moreover, diesel fuel in the US is more expensive than regular gasoline.
 

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Jun 10, 2013
682
38,980
Criminal Mexi Midget
95 altima 22 MPG combined
06 Dodge Megacab 14-16 combined the dodge has not been driven in about 2 years , bought new and only has 60K miles on it.
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
14,888
2,480
St. Louis, MO
Looking at this poll and thread as a British person, and given the cars that are on sale today, I find these MPG numbers staggeringly low. Are these typical by American standards?
US gallons and imperial gallons used in the Europe are different. So a 30 MPG car in the US is a 36 MPG car in Europe because of the difference in units. Plus, the way cars are tested in the US and EU are different, skewing results further. That's why our MPG numbers seem low compared to yours.

To answer the question, no, my car does not get 30 MPG combined. Probably closer to around 28. The 2015 WRX I have on order will probably get an MPG or two worse than my current car.
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,218
1,584
I think gas companies need to put your fuel prices in line with the u.k's then most of you wouldn't be driving around in gas guzzlers ;)

Me - 65mpg (uk gallon)
 

zin

macrumors 6502
May 5, 2010
488
6,439
United Kingdom
What are you comparing it to, and, for what purpose? For myself, a car that can't carry five adults, three of which are over 6', wouldn't be that useful. What MPG do you get?
Well, I'm just comparing the average of what I'm used to seeing between the UK/Europe and the USA.

The car that I sometimes drive (I car share) gets 40-50 MPG combined (it's a 2013 Nissan Note, and not the "New Note"). That is what it says on the specification, however, and I don't know how accurate European efficiency testing is, so the difference between American and British/European figures may not be as big as I initially thought. I've never really tested it manually.

The Wikipedia page has a table for Government requirements for new cars, too. The EU mandates 47 MPG and the U.S. will require 36 MPG.
 

miloblithe

macrumors 68020
Nov 14, 2003
2,076
28
Washington, DC
This is a question of location and driving style/needs as well as vehicle. I have a Honda fit that actually gets about 24 miles to the gallon where I live, but I live in a big city in a hilly neighborhood and have a short, stop-and go commute dropping off my kids. It gets nearly 40 miles to the gallon on a highway, but I'm rarely on one. Second car is a Prius V. It's gotten 42 miles per gallon in total so far (which is what the EPA predicts).

In terms of EPA rating though:

Fit: 28/35
Prius V: 44/40
 

zin

macrumors 6502
May 5, 2010
488
6,439
United Kingdom
US gallons and imperial gallons used in the Europe are different. So a 30 MPG car in the US is a 36 MPG car in Europe because of the difference in units. Plus, the way cars are tested in the US and EU are different, skewing results further. That's why our MPG numbers seem low compared to yours.

To answer the question, no, my car does not get 30 MPG combined. Probably closer to around 28. The 2015 WRX I have on order will probably get an MPG or two worse than my current car.
I feel a little silly not thinking to take that into consideration now. My post above might be a little misleading now.

Although, I'm sure that the Wikipedia article I posted uses one unit across the entire table. It wouldn't make any sense for comparison to use the U.S. gallon and imperial in the same table. In this case, why would the U.S. requirements be a lot lower than the European one?
 

tshrimp

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 30, 2012
366
2,658
Well, I'm just comparing the average of what I'm used to seeing between the UK/Europe and the USA.

The car that I sometimes drive (I car share) gets 40-50 MPG combined (it's a 2013 Nissan Note, and not the "New Note"). That is what it says on the specification, however, and I don't know how accurate European efficiency testing is, so the difference between American and British/European figures may not be as big as I initially thought. I've never really tested it manually.

The Wikipedia page has a table for Government requirements for new cars, too. The EU mandates 47 MPG and the U.S. will require 36 MPG.

Is this US vs an Imperial Gallon. The US car will not get as many MPGs since the US gallon is smaller. This is something else to consider.

From looking online... Is the Nissan Note the same as a Nissan Versa Note here in the US? If so that would be a very very small car for the US. Is the it considered small in the UK?

I just looked at the Note in the UK online. Nice little car I must say. However I am not sure a car that slow would do well in the US. 4 versions and the fastest is 0-62 11.7 sec.

Acceleration (0-62mph)
11.9 12.2 11.7 13.7

Is the above the speed of a normal vehicle in the UK?

In the US:
2014 Nissan Versa Note SV Hatchback (Manual) 0-60 mph 9.6 Quarter Mile 17.1

http://www.zeroto60times.com/Nissan-0-60-mph-Times.html
 
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Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
I currently have two vehicles. A 2003 Lincoln Navigator that gets 16 mpg, going down hill with a tailwind. I pretty much only drive it locally, when I need to pull a trailer or haul a giggle of little girls somewhere. My primary vehicle is a 2011 Toyota Prius Three which gets right at 50 mpg. I bought the vehicle January the 8th, 2012 (The King's Birthday) and have driven just over 60 mpg.

This is my third hybrid. I don't do it for the planet, although that is a side benefit but for the wallet. As I've said, you want to sell hybrids, Plug in hybrids or Electric Vehicles make gas $10 per gallon.

Previous EV/Hybrids
1999 GM EV-1 (2nd Gen) two year lease
1998 Chevrolet S-10 EV (piece of trash)

2000 Honda Insight (broke 60 mpg on a regular basis)
2008 Toyota Prius Touring III
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,668
1,742
One vehicle 2000 corolla, because I'm too cheap to buy a new car. I dropped the insurance to liability only a while ago. If something happens to it, I'll get a new one, at which time I'll look for something with improved gas mileage in spite of this one not being too bad. If I was fairly certain I could make a safe commute biking, I would go that route. It's not just an issue of climate. The negative effects of pollution and limitations on energy producing resources make a good case for conservation. Just to clarify though, I don't question what others drive. I just wouldn't personally elect to drive something with poor gas mileage.
 

Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
One vehicle 2000 corolla, because I'm too cheap to buy a new car. I dropped the insurance to liability only a while ago. If something happens to it, I'll get a new one, at which time I'll look for something with improved gas mileage in spite of this one not being too bad. If I was fairly certain I could make a safe commute biking, I would go that route. It's not just an issue of climate. The negative effects of pollution and limitations on energy producing resources make a good case for conservation.
You should check the math for full coverage. On older vehicles full coverage is very inexpensive. I had full coverage on my 2008 Toyota Prius even though it was paid off. When I got hit by an illegal alien with no insurance, I was really glad that I did.
 

tshrimp

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 30, 2012
366
2,658
You should check the math for full coverage. On older vehicles full coverage is very inexpensive. I had full coverage on my 2008 Toyota Prius even though it was paid off. When I got hit by an illegal alien with no insurance, I was really glad that I did.
Had the same thing happen to me, but the police refused to do anything. I elected not to get my car fixed and ended up selling it. Was a great car too. Pontiac with a Quad 4. I miss that car. Heck...I miss Pontiac.

I admit I have gone many times with only liability, but when you have a car worth $500 (per www.kbb.com) it usually doesn't pay to have full coverage. :)
 
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NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
12,141
13,987
I drive my father's 1994 GMC Suburban. It's been the family vehicle for over a decade now and was purchased for road trips from CT to Florida (there are five of us total) and to tow a trailer to VT with snowmobiles.

I appreciate having the car to use, but I'd vastly prefer a 4 cylinder that get 30+. I don't drive fast and really have no interest in cars so I just want something that goes as far as possible between gas station trips.
 

ElectronGuru

macrumors 65816
Sep 5, 2013
1,492
360
Oregon, USA
I I am just wondering how many of us walk the walk.
I grew up with a heavy car culture. 350 V8 was the standard. When I was old enough to buy my first real car, I got a big SUV with a 350 V8. It did 13 mpg, every way, every driver, every year. Putting myself through school I had a lot of places to go, so 100g per week was not unusual. I later learned of all the problems gas consumption was causing, chief among them for me, energy dependence. But I also abhor waste and like to keep vehicles for at least 10 years. 7 years back I was finally willing to replace it.

I got a 5 speed, naturally aspirated straight 4. It's less than half the weight of the SUV and with a 2 door wagon config, carries either 4 + a bit or 2 + real cargo. It will do 45 on a flat highway (38 typical) and 8-10 less in the city. But I didn't stop there. I also moved from an area where everything required a car and was a 20-40 minute drive to an area where everything (including the airport) is 5-10 and I can often walk, etc. Even with aggressive driving and a 13 gallon tank, I now rarely fill up more than once per month. Both changes combined, that's 150g per year, under 10% of what I was burning.


FYI, here's an mpg to mpg converter:
http://www.unitjuggler.com/convert-fuelconsumption-from-mpg-to-mpgimperial.html
 
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rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,408
My car gets 26 mpg which is mostly highway driving. Five years ago, I moved to a townhouse in a village where I can walk to the LIRR and the downtown strip with stores. Amazing how much less you drive when you can walk to do most of your errands.
 

tgara

macrumors 6502a
Jul 17, 2012
993
2,733
Connecticut, USA
I drive my father's 1994 GMC Suburban. It's been the family vehicle for over a decade now and was purchased for road trips from CT to Florida (there are five of us total) and to tow a trailer to VT with snowmobiles.

I appreciate having the car to use, but I'd vastly prefer a 4 cylinder that get 30+. I don't drive fast and really have no interest in cars so I just want something that goes as far as possible between gas station trips.
You drive a 20 year old Suburban as a daily driver? What's the gas mileage on that beast?
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,668
1,742
You should check the math for full coverage. On older vehicles full coverage is very inexpensive. I had full coverage on my 2008 Toyota Prius even though it was paid off. When I got hit by an illegal alien with no insurance, I was really glad that I did.
It was something around (roughly) $500/yr higher with a $500 deductible. I was concerned that the writeoff threshold would be $2000-3000 in spite of very low mileage for its age (around 100k, I lived very close to work for years and didn't always drive it). I am actually insured against under/un-insured drivers. That was cheap. It's just if I'm considered at fault they won't pay for it. If I retained that coverage, like I said it would probably go into writeoff territory pretty quickly.
 

Happybunny

macrumors 68000
Sep 9, 2010
1,752
1,351
I go from once extreme to another.:eek:

1967 AC Cobra 427" V8 10mpg if I'm lucky.:eek:

2012 Fiat 500 1200 cc 40mpg on average. :D