CDC Finds Rise in Suicides Across the U.S.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by ThisBougieLife, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. ThisBougieLife macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #1
    Sorry for the dark topic, but I'm in a dark mood right now. The news of Anthony Bourdain's suicide has gotten me feeling pretty hopeless and this news has not helped:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/cdc-finds-rise-in-suicide-rates-across-the-u-s-1528417378

    "Suicide death rates have risen significantly in most states since the late 1990s, with 25 states recording increases of more than 30%, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said."

    "The rates rose in men and women and across all age and ethnic groups, propelled by mental illness, substance-use disorders, financial hardship and relationship problems, the CDC said."

    54% of suicides were in people not previously diagnosed with a mental illness. That doesn't mean they didn't have one, of course. Suicide rates have risen in every state except Nevada.

    Do you think the rise in suicide is a reversible trend? What do you think it is about our society that leads people to seek suicide as a solution at an increasing rate? Speculate away.
     
  2. 0007776 Suspended

    0007776

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    #2
    Does anyone know if this was just a continuation of a trend of suicide rates rising, or were they steady prior to the late 90's and something happened to make them start rising then?
     
  3. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #3
    These are age old trends that always creep up after economic crashes. We never solved the systematic problems and cheer BS employment numbers that don’t facto actual living conditions for people.

    The open rise of fascist tendencies, opioid crisis, runaway corporate profits while it gets harder for Americans to get by with less that two jobs, a figure like Trump, these are all the perfectly predictable phenomena that occur when you tell the people to **** off and just ensure an inherently evil systems gets stood back up to double (quadruple?) down on the economic philosophy that has brought us to this point over the last 40 years.

    Anyone not blinded by the myth that there are two teams worth voting for (whom structural are merely different wings of the same corporate party) could see this coming as nothing changed. Social issues are great and important, but when you continue the same economic policy that still causes massive stress and human suffering this is what you get.
     
  4. ThisBougieLife thread starter macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #4
    I think that's part of it, but there are other factors at play as well. More divorce means more broken homes and families, thus less of a support network. And we can argue about it all day, but I do think we are becoming less connected as a society, the illusion of social media notwithstanding. That loss of a real personal connection between people can lead to more people going through with suicide (even if it might not be the initial cause of the suicidal tendencies in the first place).
     
  5. 0007776 Suspended

    0007776

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    I think everything you mention is a part of it and there is no one issue. I think also along the lines of how you mentioned more divorce leading to more broken homes and families I think also the stagnation in wages even as living costs have gone up has resulted in people being overworked because they have to work multiple jobs just to get by. Also even for two parent families you now have to have both parents working in order to get by and while it may be unpopular to say this I think there is a cost to not having one parent being at home (before I get accused of being sexist I think you can get the same advantage from either the mom or dad being at home).

    Another likely contributor is the change in how guns are viewed from them being simple tools for hunting to becoming objects that are the center of people's identities and are on them more often which allows much better access to an effective means of suicide when someone makes an impulsive decision to try than if a gun was even locked up and you had to find a key to get to it.
     
  6. Plutonius macrumors 604

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    #6
    I think it is mostly social media and anonymity of people online that caused the increase.

    It's often unbelievable what people will say and do to others online :(.
     
  7. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #7
    I think help should be available, but ultimately think it's each person's choice. If someone is 60+ years old and has lived a pretty full life and wants to off themselves I don't really see a problem with it.
     
  8. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

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    Well, the trend has been rising well before Trump’s election and even the most recent economic recession. If I remember correctly the greatest increase has been in woman and young adults. Frankly, I don’t think most suicidal people really care too much about in national or global politics, they’re more wrapped up with the demons in their own heads.

    Everybody has their own reasons, but underlying it all I think social media, increasing levels of materialism, academic/vocational competition, less free time, and the general weakening social/marital/family relationships are major issues. This also relates to the drug epidemics we are facing. Sometimes people intentionally OD or get sober but cannot find peace and commit suicide.

    It’s a sad state of affairs and unfortunate it’s only really coming into the public eye now that we see a string of celebrities sadly taking their lives.
     
  9. tkermit macrumors 68040

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    #9
    With all due respect, I don't think that's a particularly representative scenario for suicides. I hope you would see a problem with the fact that some people see no other way out of the problems mentioned in the OP (
    "mental illness, substance-use disorders, financial hardship and relationship problems") than killing themselves. That doesn't reflect well on society, i.e. the rest of us.
     
  10. ThisBougieLife, Jun 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018

    ThisBougieLife thread starter macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #10
    Some of those factors may be getting worse because of increasing population. In general, I do think a higher population leads to more societal trouble and stress. Not that there's much that can be done about that. But it certainly is a factor in lowering the overall quality of life.
     
  11. bradl macrumors 68040

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    What I do know is this...

    With what happened with Spade a couple of days ago, and now Bourdain, this is going to come to light really quick, let alone wanting a way to research it and see what can be done to prevent it.

    Now the question becomes whether those currently in power are going to recognize it, let alone do something about it. And seeing how some of this (read: prevention) could fall under provisions of the ACA, it really doesn't paint those currently in power in any right and pious light.

    BL.
     
  12. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

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    #12
    If someone is suffering daily because they are in a pile of financial debt or hooked on drugs im not in the business of forcing them to work through it. I think sentient adults should have this option open to them medically as well.
     
  13. 0002378, Jun 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018

    0002378 Suspended

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    #13
    People are increasingly becoming less human and more robotic, thanks to the multitude of screens and apps and social media. While hugely mistaken for increased connectedness with others, the opposite is true. Without hearing people's voices, feeling their emotions, or seeing their faces, people are more disconnected from each other than ever. People would rather live on the surface layer of reality than explore the depths of reality.

    Loneliness is at the heart of all depression and all suicide, if you examine them deeply. It is the feeling that you are alone in your struggles, that no one on this Earth can come to you and lessen your pain.

    I have experienced this disconnectedness personally, with my "friends" who'd much rather text on their cell phones and post updates to Facebook than go camping and sit around a campfire with a glass of wine, 50 miles from the nearest cell reception.

    It's like that magic spark that used to give people a reason to wake up each day has now gone or been replaced with something more sterile, more efficient, more distant, .... and far less human.

    Let's create more smart phones and more social media apps ... and make more room in the Earth to bury people who see the madness and don't want it anymore.

    ----------------

    The suicide rate can be expected not only to rise but to rise exponentially in the coming decades, if we don't rein in this tech madness.
     
  14. Snoopy4, Jun 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018

    Snoopy4 macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Blame Trump!
    --- Post Merged, Jun 8, 2018 ---
    Bingo.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 8, 2018 ---
    And this. The destruction of the nuclear family has had devastating results on society as a whole.
     
  15. NT1440 macrumors G5

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    #15
    I blame the Obama administration for being the corporate sell outs they were/are. Though the GOP was naked in their resistance to doing anything to even throw a small bone to citizens.
     
  16. 0002378, Jun 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018

    0002378 Suspended

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    #16
    You hit the nail right on the head ! Excellent points.

    I want to say a bit about the "the general weakening social/marital/family relationships".

    We, as humans, whether we will admit it or not (most don't), like and value stability. Stability gives us the room and freedom to enjoy our lives, to be in the now. Stability in the context of relationships is particularly important. After a hard day's work, there is no feeling in the world quite like the certainty that when you get home, there is a person waiting there to ask you how your day went, massage your shoulders, and cook you a meal. That feeling is priceless ! Or knowing that, if you wake up violently ill at 4 am, there is someone there who will rush to your aid. Someone who will fight the struggles of life right beside you.

    Now, take that feeling (stability) away, and what do you get ? Uncertainty (anxiety). Then take that uncertainty, and subject a human being to it ... day after day, year after year, decade after decade. What do you get ? A human being that cannot take it anymore.

    With a 60% divorce rate (or whatever it is), how can you have that stability in your life ... that foundation you need to thrive and prosper and be happy ?

    ----------------------

    I'm surprised the suicide rate isn't much higher in America. I'm certain that many more people are at or very near the threshold of suicide but are held back by religious beliefs or fear or some other totally penetrable barrier ... if people were offered a "End my life now" button that would do the job painlessly and instantaneously, I'd think that America would see a population reduction of 25 to 50% overnight.
     
  17. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68040

    Mac'nCheese

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    #17
    [QUOTE="maculateConception, post: 26137820, member: 1080494“]

    Loneliness is at the heart of all depression and all suicide, if you examine them deeply. [/QUOTE]

    Sorry but that is simply not true at all. Depression is a medical condition. One does not have to be lonely to be depressed.
     
  18. 0002378, Jun 8, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018

    0002378 Suspended

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    Here's a link to an article about the suicide of an elderly woman that has touched me greatly. She clearly highlights the problems with society these days:

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...e-couldn-t-adapt-to-modern-world-9242053.html
    --- Post Merged, Jun 8, 2018 ---


    You're talking about the definition of depression, which is only knowing it superficially. Anyone can read words out of an encyclopedia. I'm talking about how it feels, which is much deeper.

    If you've ever been depressed, how did it feel ?
     
  19. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68040

    Mac'nCheese

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    #19
    I know how it feels. It doesn’t always revolve around loneliness. Sometimes, you are not alone at all and still are depressed. That makes it worse to some.
     
  20. 0002378 Suspended

    0002378

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    #20
    You can be surrounded by a billion people and be the loneliest person on Earth.

    Alone does not = lonely :)

    In fact, it is much worse when you are surrounded by people and still feel lonely (disconnected).
     
  21. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68040

    Mac'nCheese

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    I’m not sure why you insist that loneliness is at the heart of all depression. What do you even base this on? There a lot of reasons for depression and a lot of emotions when you are depressed. Loneliness is probably one of the most common but to say it is what every depressed person feels is simply wrong.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 8, 2018 ---
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.ps...s-loneliness-just-another-form-depression?amp
     
  22. 0002378 Suspended

    0002378

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    Because depression disconnects you from the rest of the world. That is its very essence ! Look at what it is at its deepest, most fundamental level. It is an experience that disconnects you or separates you from what you perceive to be the rest of the world ... all those people that are "happy".

    It is the feeling, deep down, that no one can understand your pain, or at the very least, that no one can come to you and rescue you or take away the pain.

    I'm not saying that all depressed people will say, "I'm lonely". Most people wouldn't be able to tell loneliness from a hole in the ground. Very few will actually admit being lonely, when they really are. Most people aren't able to be introspective enough to know that they are lonely.

    Having people around you doesn't mean diddly. It's how connected and intimate you feel with them that matters.
     
  23. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68040

    Mac'nCheese

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    #23

    I gave you a link to read. It explains how loneliness and depression aren’t always connected. If you still disagree, I can tell you personal stories that I’m trying to avoid. I don’t know why you think that loneliness and depression have to be connected. Did you read this somewhere or is it just a feeling?
     
  24. 0002378 Suspended

    0002378

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    Haha, first of all, I don't put any value in what some PhD. has to say about anything, and I'll tell you why.

    It is possible to write a PhD about honey, without ever tasting honey :) That is superficial knowledge, especially when it comes to something as complex and little understood as the human brain. You can train a chimpanzee to write that article, given enough time. Yet, the chimpanzee will never know the human experience of depression.

    It is life experience that really teaches a person what depression is or what anything is. Not an article with fancy words that someone has spent 20 years putting together. I don't care if they went to Harvard or Stanford or whatever. Don't mean diddly to me.

    What I speak of is from my direct life experience. I know it in my bones. And, if your experience has been different, ok.

    Let's agree to disagree :)
     
  25. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68040

    Mac'nCheese

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    #25
    I don’t agree to that. :D
     

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