Chile (remembrance).

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Peterkro, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #1
    Today is the 35th anniversary of the Coup in Chile which resulted in the loss of thousands of lives.It is important to recall this event was supported militarily by the US intelligence agencies and ideologically by the Chicago school of economists.
     
  2. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #2
    And while the 3500 disaparecidos is a tragic number, the loss of life that would have resulted had Allende remained in power would have been even greater.

    Pin8's methods may not qualify him for the Nobel Peace Prize, but he saved a country. And when the country said it was ready to move on without him, he steped down.

    Si vas para Chile...Te ruego que pase...por donde vive mi amada...
     
  3. Queso macrumors G4

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    #3
    Inflate that number and change the name and it's almost like we're discussing Iraq isn't it?

    Same old excuses for imperialism. "The natives simply aren't capable of determining their own future. We must rescue them from themselves."
     
  4. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #4
    What on earth are you talking about? What does Chile have to do with Iraq? What does XII-IX have to do with imperialism? Who said what about natives not being able to govern themselves?

    I suppose if we inflated the number, changed the names involved, changed the geographic location, changed the events, changed the principals, and changed the motives, yes, it would almost be like discussing Iraq.

    Please tell me you are not a Republican.
     
  5. Peterkro thread starter macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #5
    Chile has quite a lot to do with Iraq,although Indonesia was perhaps a more blatant example. The use of military force to create fear and upset in a population followed up by the twisted economics of the Chicago school is as true in Iraq as it was in Chile (and several other previously independent self governing countries)
     
  6. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #6
    Ah yes! That lovely dictator Pinochet, who was wanted for murder by the Spanish so our government did the honourable thing and protected him from extradition whilst giving him medical treatment and housing him in a lovely country estate.
     
  7. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #7
    This thread is eliciting some strong feelings and interesting comments. I would like to ask two non-rhetorical questions (e.g. I am not setting you up for an argument; I ask because I am interested):

    (1) In the theoretical world, when do you think US military intervention in a foreign country is justified, if ever?

    (2) In the real world, when do you think US military intervention in a foreign country has been justified, if ever?
     
  8. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #8
    The UK owed him for keeping Argentina so nervous during the Falklands issue. You think the SAS could have handled the monster that is the Argentine army without help?

    All joking aside, the Spanish judge would have been better served utilizing a different method of going after Pin8. By the end, he looked Quixotic in his quest. You're always going to be hard pressed to get a former head of state extradited to another country without clear evidence of direct guilt.

    Indonesia is a better example. Note that it wasn't American troops that secured Santiago. It was Pin8 and the armed forces of Chile with assistance from the US. Even without aid, the coup would have happened - Allende had lost the support of the military. Other than a leader with socialist leanings being ousted by a military, I fail to see the similarity between this and Iraq.

    That Pin8's economic advisors went to Chicago seems to have been good for the country. Until the copper crash in the early 80s, they managed to rebuild the economy. Even after, they rebuilt and Chile remains the most well developed economy in SA.

    AFter the coup, domestic outlook was positive and approval was based more on quality of life improvements rather than fear of military action beyond the taking of Santiago.

    Edit:
    In response to (1), I'd say that anytime we have made a military commitment, we must get involved. Commitment must always be honored. Beyond that, I don't like the idea of intervention. If we do intervene, we have an obligation to ensure that those we affect are at least as secure as they were before, or can better control their own security. I don't want to discuss Iraq there - there are already enough threads on that.

    For (2), I'd say that any intervention founded under our obligation to honor military commitments has been proper. I'd also include those who would threaten the United States with harm are eligible for intervention. As technology improves, the ease of distinguishing the haves from the have-nots is mroe and more difficult - you rattle your sabre, we will unsheath ours.

    Not much of an answer, I know. I'm sorry.
     
  9. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #9

    I think that warrants the creation of a new thread!
     
  10. Peterkro thread starter macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #10
    The measurement that is important to me is the quality of life for the majority of Chileans, from 73 until the mid eighties GDP was either flat or going backwards,the recent so called advances have all been concentrated in a small proportion of the population. The comparison with Iraq I would have thought was obvious, although it would have been cheaper to organise a localised military coup rather than use US military for a full scale invasion the object as always is US economic advantages.
     
  11. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    #11
    I appreciate the sentiment, but that didn't work out well last time. A couple of weeks ago, I made a post in a thread, then a higher-up (presumably) took the one post and bumped it to its own thread, and then that night another higher-up sent the whole thing to the Wasteland. I'd just assume stay in the post arena now.

    If you, however, would like to start a thread based upon my two questions, I support you fully.
     
  12. Queso macrumors G4

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    #12
    Are you really that ignorant of what actions have been taken by the US government or their agencies in Latin America over the decades?

    And yes, I'm a Republican, just not in the way you use the word.
     
  13. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

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    #13
    It is absolutely shameful our corporatist government and American "academics" supported that murdering dictator.

    Friedman has the blood of thousands of Chileans on his hands. That he received a Nobel Prize is disgusting.
     
  14. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #14
    Almost as disgusting as the one awarded to Kissinger, which travesty was reportedly the reason for Tom Lehrer giving up satire, since he said the award rendered satire redundant.
     

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