Chimpanzees are natural-born murderers

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by aaronvan, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #1
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #2
    That's not news. Chimps also drink alcohol if they get their hands on it and they have sorta "chimp-wars".
    They are amongst the most vicious creatures on earth and quite similar to humans.
     
  3. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #3
    It is. This is a regarding paper in Nature, one of the highest impact factor peer-reviewed scientific journals in the world. They don't publish anything that isn't "news".
     
  4. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #4
    You are probably right.
     
  5. aaronvan thread starter Suspended

    aaronvan

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    I read somewhere that dingos are also one of the few non-human species that will kill for sport (i.e. not for food.) Can any of our Ozzie friends confirm or deny?
     
  6. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    Impossible. Everyone knows guns are required to kill.
     
  7. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    Your Chimp has achieved Gunman status.:D
     
  8. aaronvan thread starter Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #8
    Oh-oh, we've seen that movie...
     
  9. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    Don't forget that the study also found that Bonobo's, which are more closely related to us than chimps, are mostly peaceful. Instead of being preoccupied with violence and territories, they're preoccupied with sex. :)
     
  10. xmichaelp macrumors 68000

    xmichaelp

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    Interesting, but not very surprising. It makes sense being that poverty (lack of resources) leads to violent behavior.

    ----------

    I bet you couldn't find a single able-minded person on the planet who thinks that.
     
  11. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    You're going to fit in here just fine.
     
  12. kingalexthe1st macrumors 6502

    kingalexthe1st

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    Pretty sure chimpanzees are our nearest relations. More than Bonobos. Besides, the social tendencies of chimps doesn't in fact mean much in relation to our own social tendencies. We have more in common with birds than chimps, or any of the great apes, in this regard.

    Alex
     
  13. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    Bonobos diverged from humans later than chimps, so there is greater similarity between their DNA and ours. Genetically, they are our closest living relative. Also, your second statement that birds are more socially similar to humans than apes doesn't really hold up to the evidence we currently have. Just sayin'.
     
  14. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #14
    i know, most humans can't get through lunch without a few kills.
     
  15. kingalexthe1st macrumors 6502

    kingalexthe1st

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    #15
    I was quite surprised by this so I did a quick google and I found that Bonobos and Chimps have the same genetic 'distance' from us. Not sure where you've found that bonobos diverged later than chimps, I couldn't find that. Either way, I was surprised. I learned something new today :)

    Let me clarify. What I meant to say was that in terms of sexual interactions, which leads on to social behaviour, ours is more like birds than the apes.

    Orang-utans live alone, with females in territories and males command many territories and therefore many females.
    Gibbons are monogamous but the male is a lousy Dad. He doesn't provide, teach or protect the young.
    Gorillas take the alpha-male, harem approach.
    Chimpanzees live in groups, but the females mate with many of the males and the males take no part in rearing the young.
    Bonobos are promiscuous in every sense of the word.
    We humans live in groups, monogamously with both mother and father giving to the child, but with occasional cheating and affairs from both sexes. This style is not found in other apes, but plenty of bird species show this way of breeding and socialising. Off the top of my head, the Albatross does this.

    Just sayin'

    Alex
     
  16. lannister80 macrumors 6502

    lannister80

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    #16
    Well, we do *now*. Who knows that biologically-modern humans were doing 150,000 years ago?
     
  17. kingalexthe1st macrumors 6502

    kingalexthe1st

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    #17
    All this is explained from a hunter-gatherer perspective, which was approx. 4 million years ago (I think) on the Europe, Eurasia and African continents. I'm a little hazy on the specifics but it's all in The Red Queen which is a great book exploring the evolution of sex, how it shapes the society of animals, and our psychology. Highly recommended, though it's a tough read in places.

    Alex
     
  18. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #18
    Just a minor edit... :)
     

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