Chocolate milk might soon be banned in CT Schools

MacNut

macrumors Core
Original poster
Jan 4, 2002
21,547
7,802
CT
A chocolate milk ban could be coming to school cafeterias around Connecticut.
Lawmakers signed off on the bill and pushed it to Gov. Dannel Malloy's desk for his signature. They said it boils down to federal funding.

"I know several kids who won't drink any milk if it's not chocolate," said Mary Manwaring of Rocky Hill.
Mary Manwaring's daughter Bethany said when given the choice, she always chose chocolate.
"It has chocolate in it and I like chocolate," fourth-grader Bethany Manwaring said.

As a mother, Mary Manwaring said she won't fight that argument because at the end of the day, Bethany was still getting nutrients from the milk.
All of that could change after state legislators approved a bill that would ban that and some juices from public schools.
Under the proposal, the only thing that would be served is low-fat unflavored milk and beverages with no artificial sweeteners, no added sodium and no more than four grams of sugar per ounce.

With high fructose corn syrup and 200 milligrams of sodium on the label, chocolate milk would not make the cut.
"They're going to be pretty upset because most of the class drinks chocolate milk," Bethany said.
"If it's a little bit of chocolate, it's the least of our worries," said Mary Manwaring.

Lawmakers said if they did not make the move, the state would not get money from the federal Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act. It authorized and set policies for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's child nutrition programs, including school lunches.

However, child nutrition experts were not on board. Eyewitness News spoke with Jill Castle, a registered dietitian nutritionist from New Canaan.
"From a nutrient profile, you're getting calcium, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus and other nutrients," she said.
Castle went on to say that when chocolate milk was removed, overall milk consumption among children went down.
Bethany said she saw it first-hand.

"With most milks, we only go through two bins, but for chocolate, we go through four bins," she explained.
Eyewitness News reached out to the governor's office. Officials said Malloy would review the bill.
If he signs it, it would take effect July 1 and the changes would be seen during the next school year.
http://www.wfsb.com/story/25525302/chocolate-milk-ban-close-to-coming-to-connecticut-schools
Isn't it better that kids drink chocolate milk rather than no milk at all?
 

localoid

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2007
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America's Third World
According to NBC Connecticut "Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy will not sign a bill to ban chocolate milk from school lunchrooms statewide."

“This specific bill has not yet come to the Governor’s desk and will be reviewed in detail when it arrives. However, on the broader topic at hand, the Governor is not supportive of banning chocolate milk in public schools," Andrew Doba, Malloy's communication director, said in an e-mailed statement. "While we must be extremely mindful of the nutritional value of what’s offered to students, ensuring an appropriate array of options helps to ensure that kids receive the calcium and other nutrients they need.”
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
Isn't it better that kids drink chocolate milk rather than no milk at all?
It's an interesting question, though it needs a bit of clarification ...

Is it better that some children drink chocolate milk than no milk at all?

What percentage of children won't drink any milk at all if it isn't chocolate milk? Is it worth the expense to provide chocolate milk for that percentage?

And there's the question of nutrition.

According to a Google search, chocolate milk has over three times the fat, twice the carbs, twice the sugar. While there appears to be a small bump in vitamins, chocolate milk also comes with a little dose of caffeine.

I could see not serving chocolate milk simply to improve the diet of school children.
 

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localoid

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2007
2,428
1,724
America's Third World
Well, we could just forget about addressing the nation's child obesity problem...

But if we did, as the 'Fed Up' documentary recently pointed out, a likely result would be that "over 95 percent of all Americans will be overweight or obese in two decades".

 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Original poster
Jan 4, 2002
21,547
7,802
CT
It's an interesting question, though it needs a bit of clarification ...

Is it better that some children drink chocolate milk than no milk at all?

What percentage of children won't drink any milk at all if it isn't chocolate milk? Is it worth the expense to provide chocolate milk for that percentage?

And there's the question of nutrition.

According to a Google search, chocolate milk has over three times the fat, twice the carbs, twice the sugar. While there appears to be a small bump in vitamins, chocolate milk also comes with a little dose of caffeine.

I could see not serving chocolate milk simply to improve the diet of school children.
Most kids don't like milk, the only way they drink it is if it is chocolate. So should they give up all milk consumption if they ban chocolate milk?
 

iBlazed

macrumors 68000
Feb 27, 2014
1,593
1,224
New Jersey, United States
These kids are sweating mountain dew for christ's sake. Cutting chocolate milk from their daily diets isn't the worst idea. And what's the deal with kids drinking milk with lunch anyway? When I was a kid my parents always told me that mixing milk with meat would give me a stomach ache. Milk is something I always reserve for eating with cookies or cereal, not to wash other food down with. It's called WATER, people!
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Original poster
Jan 4, 2002
21,547
7,802
CT
These kids are sweating mountain dew for christ's sake. Cutting chocolate milk from their daily diets isn't the worst idea. And what's the deal with kids drinking milk with lunch anyway? When I was a kid my parents always told me that mixing milk with meat would give me a stomach ache. Milk is something I always reserve for eating with cookies or cereal, not to wash other food down with. It's called WATER, people!
Sometimes I like milk with steak or pork. Chocolate milk actually.:)
 

noodlemanc

macrumors regular
Mar 25, 2010
208
17
Australasia
These kids are sweating mountain dew for christ's sake. Cutting chocolate milk from their daily diets isn't the worst idea. And what's the deal with kids drinking milk with lunch anyway? When I was a kid my parents always told me that mixing milk with meat would give me a stomach ache. Milk is something I always reserve for eating with cookies or cereal, not to wash other food down with. It's called WATER, people!
I believe it's a program that got started in the 50s and 60s to make sure school children got lots of calcium.
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Original poster
Jan 4, 2002
21,547
7,802
CT
I believe it's a program that got started in the 50s and 60s to make sure school children got lots of calcium.
They always wanted kids to drink milk. I don't ever remember being told to drink more water in school.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,671
1,746
They always wanted kids to drink milk. I don't ever remember being told to drink more water in school.
It primarily related to calcium. They also fortify it with some fat soluble vitamins. It would be interesting to know if kids could get the necessary calcium and vitamins elsewhere. I'm genuinely unsure whether the net effect of drinking chocolate milk is positive here. I doubt it, but I'm not sure. Even then there are chocolate milk brands with less sugar than what was quoted by that article. As is typical the goal is cheap and palatable.
 

noodlemanc

macrumors regular
Mar 25, 2010
208
17
Australasia
It primarily related to calcium. They also fortify it with some fat soluble vitamins. It would be interesting to know if kids could get the necessary calcium and vitamins elsewhere. I'm genuinely unsure whether the net effect of drinking chocolate milk is positive here. I doubt it, but I'm not sure. Even then there are chocolate milk brands with less sugar than what was quoted by that article. As is typical the goal is cheap and palatable.
Chocolate milk is still much better than stuff like mountain dew/other soft drinks, which lots of kids would want to drink if they couldn't have chocolate milk.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,671
1,746
Chocolate milk is still much better than stuff like mountain dew/other soft drinks, which lots of kids would want to drink if they couldn't have chocolate milk.
I don't understand why they keep any of that at schools. A step toward improving obesity would be to veer away from drinking calories. It's quite easy to consume a lot of them that way without feeling full. Milk might be the exception.
 

noodlemanc

macrumors regular
Mar 25, 2010
208
17
Australasia
I don't understand why they keep any of that at schools. A step toward improving obesity would be to veer away from drinking calories. It's quite easy to consume a lot of them that way without feeling full. Milk might be the exception.
It would be quite an adjustment for American kids to start drinking water ;)
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,671
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It would be quite an adjustment for American kids to start drinking water ;)
It would. I forgot to mention this before, but if chocolate milk is off the menu due to sodium and sugar content, I doubt they would be able to retain soft drinks by the same standards. Even if they don't ban it entirely, I hope they at least consider brands that are lower in sugar. It's inevitable that any of these changes will be unpopular with kids at the beginning, but kids will become acclimatized to the lower sugar levels. I don't think the goals here are that bad. They just need to ensure that the final implementations actually work as intended.

Parents actually have a limited amount of control when it comes to what their kids eat at school. I can remember seeing greasy pizza and chocolate milk. During high school they had large fountain drinks and donuts/cinnamon rolls for sale. I don't see why schools should be contributing unhealthy items. They just need to fine tune the programs to something that actually works. The idea of offering more fruits and vegetables isn't a bad one. They just can't be gross.
 

roadbloc

macrumors G3
Aug 24, 2009
8,779
211
UK
Lol. This is why America has huge obesity rates. Some kids won't even drink milk without chocolate in them. Personally I'd say it was time to ease the youth into a healthier diet so y'all don't end up being taller when you lie on the ground.
 

citizenzen

macrumors 65816
Mar 22, 2010
1,433
11,628
Most kids don't like milk, the only way they drink it is if it is chocolate. So should they give up all milk consumption if they ban chocolate milk?
Then something's changed in the decades since I was a kid (which is entirely possible). Back then everyone drank regular milk and liked it just fine.

However, if kids today are used to having a choice of milk, then it's not hard to understand why they'd build a preference to chocolate.
 

Jessica Lares

macrumors G3
Oct 31, 2009
9,200
722
Near Dallas, Texas, USA
The chocolate milk isn't the issue, it's the other things they put in the menu. They still let you buy a whole quart of ice cream in middle school lunch rooms over here for instance. That, and full-sized pastries. And they charge less for that, then they do plain popcorn. Disgusting.
 

richwoodrocket

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2014
2,127
111
Buffalo, NY
Chocolate milk might soon be banned in CT Schools

I don't really think it's necessary to ban chocolate milk in schools. I mean come on, who dosent like chocolate milk?
I get chocolate milk everyday when I buy my lunch.
 

Huntn

macrumors demi-god
May 5, 2008
17,082
16,605
The Misty Mountains
Interesting article on the subject, 1 cup 100 cal (low fat) vs 160 calories (low fat chocolate), plus the vitamins and calcium. One view is that the positive stuff in milk is important for a kids diet if they are also eating lots of other junk. The real issue is that at least in the U.S. (can't speak for Europe) eating habits have gone to hell. A larger percentage of people eat out and that arguably is a less healthy diet than what we used to eat at home. And for kids, we are raising them on junk food getting them hooked early on sugar and god it shows. A much higher percentage of rolly polleys, then when I was growing up.


The question becomes, just roll with the punches and pudgy kids or crack down in school? This issue arises on occasion when moves are made to correct problems with society. Recreational drugs is a good example. Should we be treating kids and food in the same manner? Possibly if it can be effective. The real problem is that school by itself won't help if kids are stuffing their faces at home when they walk in the door after being "good" at school.

My guess is that it will take a concerted effort at both home and school to help these kids see the issue and motivate them to change their ways.
 

haxrnick

macrumors 6502a
Aug 4, 2011
530
1,937
Seattle
Never mind getting them to actually go outside and do something crazy like play sports or exercise. Let's just ban things!
 

Technarchy

macrumors 604
May 21, 2012
6,747
4,885
The issue is kids are not getting enough physical activity.

Dietary fat is not equal to body fat.

Simple concept. Macros, calories in and calories out. That's it.

American children are not as active as they were in previous generations. Burning less calories per day, but eating more calorie rich foods means fat children, fat adults.

1 - go out and play
2 - engage in a formal sporting activity
3 - walk more
4 - stop playing video games and go outside

Liberals and the lazy are always looking for shortcuts when it comes to fitness but it really is very simple.

* If you are in a caloric deficit by either activity or eating less, you will lose weight.

I promise my diet is higher in fat, processed foods, sugar, sodium and all kinds of other garbage. I can still mountain bike for hours, run like a gazelle, bench and squat for fun, and still have the abs and arms that keep the wife happy.
 

G51989

macrumors 68030
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
Interesting article on the subject, 1 cup 100 cal (low fat) vs 160 calories (low fat chocolate), plus the vitamins and calcium. One view is that the positive stuff in milk is important for a kids diet if they are also eating lots of other junk. The real issue is that at least in the U.S. (can't speak for Europe) eating habits have gone to hell. A larger percentage of people eat out and that arguably is a less healthy diet than what we used to eat at home. And for kids, we are raising them on junk food getting them hooked early on sugar and god it shows. A much higher percentage of rolly polleys, then when I was growing up.

Image

The question becomes, just roll with the punches and pudgy kids or crack down in school? This issue arises on occasion when moves are made to correct problems with society. Recreational drugs is a good example. Should we be treating kids and food in the same manner? Possibly if it can be effective. The real problem is that school by itself won't help if kids are stuffing their faces at home when they walk in the door after being "good" at school.

My guess is that it will take a concerted effort at both home and school to help these kids see the issue and motivate them to change their ways.
I think eating habits are a big problem.

I really hate fat people, a lot. They are a disgrace to humanity.

Gotta find a way to stop kids from being fatties.