Christians declining, "nones" rising . .. hip hip hooray!

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by caesarp, May 12, 2015.

  1. caesarp macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    Maybe there is a light at the end of the tunnel after all, let's hope this continues:

    "The Christian share of the U.S. population is declining, while the number of U.S. adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing, according to an extensive new survey by the Pew Research Center. Moreover, these changes are taking place across the religious landscape, affecting all regions of the country and many demographic groups. While the drop in Christian affiliation is particularly pronounced among young adults, it is occurring among Americans of all ages."

    http://www.pewforum.org/2015/05/12/americas-changing-religious-landscape/
     
  2. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #2
    Isn't it time for "nones" to regroup and organise, to lobby for them instead of letting religious extremists decide for them? They are quite numerous, after all, and not vocal enough.
     
  3. caesarp thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    The importance of education . . . per the report

    And get yourself educated (from the Pew report):

    ◾Hindus and Jews continue to be the most highly educated religious traditions. Fully 77% of Hindus are college graduates, as are 59% of Jews (compared with 27% of all U.S. adults). These groups also have above-average household incomes. Fully 44% of Jews and 36% of Hindus say their annual family income exceeds $100,000, compared with 19% of the public overall.​

    As culturally jewish, I can't help but like this stat.
     
  4. Maury macrumors 6502

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    What?!? Is this a terminology issue? Is this counting bachelor's and up, only, and excluding diploma/community college? I ask, because...

    In 2012, about 53.6% of Canadians aged 15 and over had trade certificates, college diplomas and university degrees.​

    I know that well over half of those are university degrees.
     
  5. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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  6. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #6
    This is very encouraging. What used to be an agonizing drip-drip-drip has now become a slow but steady stream. As Arthur C. Clarke used to put it, "Some of us have a chance of seeing the end of the Dark Ages."
     
  7. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #7
    Meanwhile, our legion of Pastafarians is growing.
     
  8. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    #8
    Some Christians have made themselves look like hate filled monsters. Preachers raking in the money and preaching gay hate and killing gays and republican GOP forcing their faith on others no wonder people don't want that anymore. it is not god that's the problem it is his fan club.
     
  9. WestonHarvey1 macrumors 68020

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    #9
    That sounds insane and paranoid.
     
  10. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    #10
    except it is true. we see pretty much every day some preacher saying gays are bad or should die want a few examples? want a few examples of preachers getting rich? want some examples of them getting caught doing bad things? easy to get those for you. all you need to do is look at the GOP candidates and their crazy things they say with a christian slant.
     
  11. WestonHarvey1 macrumors 68020

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    #11
    Gays are bad and should die... uh yeah I don't think that's exactly a mainstream position in Christianity. I'm Catholic... you know, that church that really, really, really hates gays? I've never heard a priest say anything remotely like that in all my life.
     
  12. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #12
    I'll be honest, as someone who considers himself a Christian, that I don't necessarily see this as a good thing.

    Granted, I think that the intrusion of religious doctrines too much into the public sphere has been very harmful to the progress of the US Federal and various State Governments. This I attribute to the growth of Evangelicalism, many facets of which I disagree strongly with.

    That said, I think that a great many people find tremendous spiritual value in the Church, and that organized religion can do a great deal to foster bonds within any community.

    I don't think any less of those who follow a different religion, nor indeed none at all. But I do feel that the larger Christian faith has been - overall - a greatly positive influence throughout much of modern European and American history.
     
  13. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    really where have you been? pretty sheltered I guess. of course not all are like this but the ones that are stand out. just look at duck dynasty it is the bad apple that makes the whole barrel look bad. So many preachers in the US are rich and spend little to help the poor. they have jets and nice cars and see to care little. or course not all are this way but it is out there in peoples face. the whole gay thing is going to be a great problem for Christians. as we find out people don't have a choice about their sexuality
    being called bad because of something they don't have a choice about.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...-calls-for-killing-gays-to-end-aids/19929973/
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/anti-gay-pastors/
    http://mic.com/articles/22654/10-most-wildly-anti-gay-preachers-in-america
    http://www.addictinginfo.org/2015/0...sh-even-though-his-wife-wasnt-so-lucky-video/
     
  14. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #14
    Do you need other people to believe the same way you do in order for you to feel comfortable about your choice to be an atheist? That is the only way your rejoicing in your thread title makes any sense...
     
  15. Solomani macrumors 68030

    Solomani

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    #15
    Misery loves company.
     
  16. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #16
    The article actually tracked people who don't claim membership with a given religion. They didn't necessarily identify as atheists.
     
  17. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    Still doesn't explain what the "hip hip hooray!" in the title was about other than wanting people to also go away from religion so the OP can feel validated about his choice.
     
  18. dec. Suspended

    dec.

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    #18
    I couldn't care less what other people "believe" (or better "were told to follow"), but obviously the effects for society definitely will have their benefits when more and more people don't accept a "but, but... my 'god' doesn't like this or that" as a serious argument in legislative questions. And it can also benefit those who think that they have to follow whatever they've been told to follow in the way of encouraging them to form an own opinion instead of the "that's the way it is" that they've adopted together with their ideology.

    ----------

    The result is that "my ideology and 'god' say that you're a 'sinner'" will have far less weight in the future, which is the ideal basis for a secular state.
     
  19. caesarp, May 12, 2015
    Last edited: May 12, 2015

    caesarp thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    No. You have misinterpreted the thread title (but nice try in attempting to speak for me). I'm not celebrating fellow non religists (as I prefer to call myself). I feel super comfortable already in knowing that there is no magical daddy in the sky (and have since I was about 10 years old). I'm celebrating the decline (and hopefully the eventual end) of believers in desert nomad religions and myths and fairy tales from when people thought the earth was flat and the sun revolved around the earth. And hopefully the end of believers in some daddy in the sky that allegedly controls everyone and everything. Please. Time to grow up people.

    C'mon, we all know that stuff is not meant to be taken seriously anymore. I don't care what your parents melted into your head. Let's stop pretending the desert nomad/bronze age myths still speak for us today or that there is some daddy in the sky paying attention to whether you are bad or good. Please. Let's stop that nonsense already.

    If you want to have a club to have a "sense of community" that's fine. If you want to have a club to dictate to you what to wear, what to eat, what to celebrate, how to live life and where you feel that's the only place that will give you a moral compass (and without which you would be a lost raving psychopath), by all means, join some club and stand together and sing nice songs. But lets stop the silly beliefs that go along with it, that we all know are nonsense. Okay?

    That's what I'm celebrating, that maybe, just maybe, our civilization is finally growing up and not acting like infants looking for a daddy in the sky to take care of them and tell them what to do.

    ----------

    Why are you so puzzled about hip hip hooray. I didn't really put that much thought into it - -its a thread title. It doesn't require explanation or necessarily have one. I don't understand your obsession with thread titles. Read the content, not the headline.

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    Wrong, its because it is better for all of us (I'm expressing happiness at the general results revealed). Are you really that dense that the term "hip hip hooray" needs to be explained? Stop putting words in people's mouths. And you do know that religion poisons everything -- right?
     
  20. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #20
    Not so insane and paranoid. I experienced what steve knight is talking about myself. The older I got, the less sense religion made to me, so I already had one foot out the door.

    Seeing the rise of the religious right and the politicians who insist this is a Christian country not a secular one, that gay marriage is abnormal, that teens shouldn't get sex ed, that God belongs on our money and in our pledge and in our textbooks, that settled science is merely one guy's opinion, and on and on, didn't just get my other foot out the door -- it practically shoved me.
     
  21. A.Goldberg, May 12, 2015
    Last edited: May 12, 2015

    A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

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    #21
    I think it's quite obvious the younger generations of people do not affiliate with regions and religious institutions the way the past groups have. I'd be curious to see how this trend compares to the increase of atheism/agnosticism. One can be areligious, but still believe in god. There also seem to be people who are not religious, may even be atheists, yet still follow America's Christian culture and their viewpoints- homophobia, pro-life, etc.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, I don't think the disappearence of religion would change a whole lot. People may still hold seemingly archaic or ridiculous opinions on things regardless of what a religion teaches them. Some people might think it's wrong to kill unborn human babies or that homosexual relationships are "unnatural". There might be one less confounding factor, but people will still have justifications and means for bigotry, war, abuse, fraud, etc. Religion has undoubtably been used to justify terrible and atrocious things, but it is not the sole cause of evil. I believe the people who commit crimes under the guise of religion are a vast minority.

    While it makes sense that we're looking at religion from a Western or American context, not all religions have "magical sky daddies." You could debate the only "magical sky daddy" in Abrahamic religions would be in Christianity. Many people believe in the philosophy, rather than the mythology. I think it's also unfair to group all religious people, or all of one specific religion, into having the same viewpoint, regardless of what the official position of the religion is.

    People are going to believe whatever they believe. Some people have a need for spirituality, others do not. Religions are not static, as there are many sects of individual religions, some of them change and adapt to the times (while some do not, of course). I suspect we will see big changes in our lifetime, like what has already been seen in the past couple years with the Catholic Church.
     
  22. dec. Suspended

    dec.

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    #22
    Besides the necessary wishful thinking, how is that supposed to work?
     
  23. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #23
    Buddhism.

    Oops. Misread it.

    I thought he said religious, but still not believe there is a god.
     
  24. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #24
    Like with any other religion, converting someone to Atheism is applauded. But instead of an extra harp or two more virgins, atheists get a free jar of pickles for every infidel they convert.

    And remember: Richard Dawkins is proud of you ;)
     
  25. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #25
    Why would you assume the OP is miserable? Because he's an atheist?
     

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