City officials urge ban on 'potentially offensive' language

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by rdowns, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    #1
    ****ing insane.

    Please note that we can no longer offend the disabled by calling your big ass closet a "walk-in" and your master bedroom is an offensive term. Reverse cowgirl will now be known as reverse cowperson.


    http://www.komonews.com/news/local/...tionally-offensive-language----218033521.html
     
  2. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #2
  3. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #3
    While I have no problem referring to groups by their preferred designations (e.g. "little people" for dwarfs and midgets), I do agree that things can, and perhaps have, gone a bit wonky.

    OT: I am incredibly offended by split infinitives! :p ;)
     
  4. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

    Joined:
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    Location:
    A man of the people. The right sort of people.
    #4
    Citizen don't bother me none, or brown bag. The one that irritates me no-end is 'subject'. Occasionally some slime-ball on the TV will refer to British citizens as subjects (during some Royal sideshow event). You come across it in law more than anywhere else now thankfully, but it still gets a rise out of me to hear it.



    Doing what's right.
    She has a right.

    Clear?
     
  5. likemyorbs macrumors 68000

    likemyorbs

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    #5
    This is just plain sick. Maybe they should smoke some of their newly legalized weed and chill the eff out.
     
  6. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    #6
    They use the term "sack-lunch"!? I'm offended!

    That suggests that lunch can only be eaten by people with a sack...chauvinist pigs!
     
  7. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    Gramps, what the hell am I paying you for?
    #7
    People without a sack can use a lunch box instead. [​IMG]
     
  8. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    #8
    lmfao!
     
  9. rdowns thread starter macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #9

    /thread.
     
  10. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #10
    There was an incident in the south Seattle industrial area where an employee became uncomfortable with the word used for a temporary construction framework because it sounded racist. The shop had to start using the word "fixture" to make this guy more comfortable. Luckily, no one at the shop was inclined toward little Irish dances.
     
  11. citizenzen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #11
    I'm pretty tolerant when it comes to political correctness.

    And I can see the point behind "citizen".

    But "brown bag"?

    That one just baffles me.
     
  12. stroked Suspended

    stroked

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    May 3, 2010
    #12
    What is wrong with this word? Who do these stupid people think they work for?
     
  13. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #13
    Gotta love the irony. So when are you changing your username?:rolleyes:
     
  14. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #14
     
  15. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #15
    There's nothing "wrong" with it.

    But ...

    You can be a citizen of the United States. It's an official and meaningful designation that indicates you were born here, naturalized or went through the process to citizenship.

    But there is no such official designation for city dwellers. There is no such thing as Seattle citizenship. So I can see how that term might be reconsidered especially in light of the current political battle over illegal immigration.

    Even "resident" isn't entirely appropriate IMO, as that implies one has lived for some time in the city, and a good percentage of people in the city are travelers, transients or lived there short-term. Yet these people are still provided the same services and rights that long-term residents enjoy.

    I believe "the people" would be the most accurate term.

    ----------

    Irony?

    I'm just talking about terms and definitions.

    Try not to take it too seriously.
     
  16. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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  17. vrDrew, Aug 3, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2013

    vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #17
    I guess I see this very differently.

    You don't think that Starbucks; McDonalds; Disney; and Apple (the shining stars of what we think represent excellence in capitalist customer-service) periodically instruct their staff on the preferred words to use in a business setting?

    But when Government managers try and bring the same level of service to their departments you view it as another step on the road to the Gulag? Puhlease..

    I do a fair amount of technical writing. And part of that process is rigorously eliminating words and phrases that can cause confusion (at best) or offense (at worst.) I make absolutely certain that we don't see "niggling problems" or a "chink in the armor" show up in company documentation.

    As a writer I'm glad to see the back of some of those phrases. If nothing else they are shopworn clichés.

    Not that there aren't sometimes questions. One of them is the use of the word "guest." I'm a "guest" if I stay at my mom's house. I'm a "guest" if I check into a Motel 6 or the Four Seasons. I guess I'm OK with being a "guest" at DisneyWorld or Six Flags. But if I'm buying pants at the Gap I'm a "customer" (a perfectly accurate and inoffensive word). "Guest," to me, suggests its OK if I take a nap on the couch and rummage through the refrigerator.

    Sometimes there are real challenges. Try as I might, there really wasn't an alternative to the use of the term "bastard" to describe a particular type of mill file. I could have come up with a complicated work around - but it was only going to cause confusion. So we went with the word that pretty much every wood and metalworker understands. The marital status of their parents notwithstanding.
     
  18. Andeavor macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    #18
    But ya are, Blanche, ya are...!

    I'd love to be called a subject, it makes me think of chivalry and court ladies. Unfortunately centuries ago, our ancestors kicked our ruling royals out of their castle leaving us with a tourist attraction adorning the cliff side above an Autobahn-tunnel.

    How fornicatingly romantic.
     
  19. rdowns thread starter macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #19

    It is. Seriously, if freshman are now first year, we better change sophomore to sopholess. I wouldn't want to put any undue pressure on those precious second year students.

    BRB, I have to go change my thread title from gun nut to gun enthusiast. Way too many kids are allergic to nuts.
     
  20. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #20
    I agree in principle, but there is no need to pander to poor vocabulary. Niggling is etymologically unrelated to skin colour.
    As for saying citizen when you mean resident - or perhaps "denizen" - it makes sense to say what you mean, but that is not political correctness, that's just correctness, plain and simple.
     
  21. citizenzen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #21
    Beautifully said. There's nothing wrong with increasing the level of consideration used in both private and public forums.

    I didn't get the problem with "brown bag" until I looked a bit more into it. Apparently there was a custom of using brown bags as a sort of color swatch to compare to one's skin tone in order to determine if they were light enough to allow admittance or acceptance in some event or club.

    Even though I'm 52 years old I was unfamiliar with this practice, though I imagine there are people who remember it. However, I'm inclined to believe that most people are utterly unaware of that bygone practice and that making a point of avoiding the term is unnecessary in this case.
     
  22. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #22
    Agreed, residentzen.
     
  23. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    Mar 22, 2010
    #23
    You know as well as I do that we can't change our usernames.

    Otherwise, I'd choose thepeoplezen.

    ;)
     
  24. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    New England, USA
    #24
    Actually, you can change your username. Send in a Contact Us form, explain why you would like to change your username...and unless you're running from the law, it will likely be changed. It is ultimately the decision of the Admin Team.

    So now the question is, do I challenge you to change your username....nah!;)

    :D
     
  25. citizenzen, Aug 3, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2013

    citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #25
    Lucky me. For a moment there I thought I'd be obligated.


    Edit: at the risk of taking a ridiculous idea too seriously, I will point out that my username describes me and not a population of people. As a citizen of the U.S. it is an accurate description and therefore not politically incorrect.

    A truer parallel would be if instead of calling MR users, "members" they were called "citizens". And if that were the case I would agree that changing the title to "members" would be a more appropriate title.
     

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