Closed Caucuses/Primaries

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by SilentPanda, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #1
    I don't tread in this forum often but I figured the people that do might be able to answer some political questions I have. I have very little political knowledge so I could be very wrong on anything I say below.

    Growing up I was mostly taught in school that you vote for the President and whoever gets the most votes wins! Of course the system is slightly more complex than that... then again maybe that was all the attention span I had for politics back then. After watching some of the democratic debates I got to thinking... what if the candidate I like doesn't even get on the ballot? Right now is when we have the widest range of candidates. I'm not particularly democrat or republican. So I did some research on how to get a candidate on the ballot and that seemed to fall into the primaries.

    I got the impression that if you wanted a specific candidate on the ballot so you could even vote for them (aside from a write in which probably isn't going to win anyway) you need to go to your states primary. I live in Iowa (I hear we're semi important for some reason) and both the democratic and republican caucus are closed caucuses which means I can't really have a say unless I register with one of the parties.

    At this point I'm still undecided as to which candidate on either side but would like to attend one of the two caucuses once I do decide. Is it possible to register with a given party the day before, the week before, the month before, etc? I understand the desire for a closed caucus but I would like to participate once I figure out the candidate I prefer, not the party. Will the affect me registering for the opposite party at the next election?

    Or am I completely incorrect in my research and should resume my semi apolitical life? :D
     
  2. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #2
    Voter Registration Deadlines

    For most elections, the last day to register to vote is 11
    days before the date of the election. For statewide primary
    and general elections, the deadline is 10 days before the
    election. There is an election calendar available on the
    Secretary of State’s website: www.sos.state.ia.us.

    http://www.sos.state.ia.us/pdfs/elections/GuidRegVoters.pdf

    I'm assuming you can change your party affiliation at any time by just registering again.
     
  3. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    #3
    the Des Moines Register web site has the following info about attending;

    more info
     
  4. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    New York
  5. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #5
    Dude go for it! From what I hear, the Iowa caucuses are some of the wildest political swingin' times out there. There's horse-trading and arm twisting going on for votes all day long.

    Just be forewarned, IIRC you have to stick it out until the day is over. You cannot cast a vote and leave in the Iowa caucuses. You have to physically stand (or possibly sit, not sure) in the area for your chosen candidate while representatives of other candidates come and attempt to persuade you to move to their candidate's corner.

    Give us a report if you decide to go.
     
  6. SilentPanda thread starter Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #6
    Horse trading???? Arm twisting?!?! I'm in!

    It looks like the republican one is from 7pm to 8pm and is a "drop your vote in the hat" style thing. The democrat one is where you have to stand until each corner has at least 15%. Or so I've read. Still new to all of this of course.
     
  7. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Location:
    A geographical oddity
    #7
    Republicans are always the boring ones.

    And, I think the caucuses would be even more fun if you had horse twisting and arm trading.
     

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