Commentary: RE: Flag Pin and 28th Amendment

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by PlaceofDis, May 20, 2008.

  1. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #1
    http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/05/19/roland.martin.05.19/index.html


    i thought it was a rather well thought out, and well put commentary on the levels of ridiculousness that we have entered into this primary season about something so small and insignificant in the grand scheme of things.
     
  2. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    Seriously, "Flag Pin" for a constitutional amendment. What became of the real issues like freedom of speech?
     
  3. PlaceofDis thread starter macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #3
    its called sarcasm.
     
  4. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    I was responding to the article, I assume they are serious ;).

    Clearly I missed that one :eek:.
     
  5. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    OBJECTIVE reality
    #5
    Nice commentary.

    I have to say I'm disappointed that the normally golden-tongued Obama has not answered this question very well. I've been waiting for him to say something like,

    "There are plenty of people who wear lapel flag pins whose actions show they have no real interest in supporting our country. It's what you do -- how your actions strengthen your country rather than weak it -- that shows your patriotism...not what you wear on your chest."​

    And he could choose to elaborate from there on how Bush and any number of flag pin-bearing Republicans have shown their "patriotism" by putting Americans into deep debt, supporting corporations over people, depleting our military in this farce of a war, and showing an overarching disrespect for our Constitution.
     
  6. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #6
    Ok tattoo artists, get busy. The forehead please.

    Never leave home without it.

    Personally, I always wear my Canadian pin when travelling (except in the States).

    I would not like being a victim of mistaken identity.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Antares macrumors 68000

    Antares

    #7
    Wow! Major misinformation there. Even coming from you. :eek: I'm not happy with a lot of the things that happened in the last 8 years but I would never say this drivel. At least leave out the debt part as that is blatantly false.

    And yes, I agree that the whole flag pin thing is a waste of time and pointless. But with Obama, this points to one of the larger issues with him.
     
  8. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #8
    Level of ridiculousness? So are there actually people who take this issue seriously (that is, the people who are being satirized here), from whom I am shielded because I read the NYT and listen to NPR? :eek:
     
  9. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    Pocket Universe, nth Dimensional Complex Manifold
    #9
    Yeah... "Larger", empty, meaningless "issues" people who navel-gaze and don't care about important issues affecting our nation like to talk about. I don't like those "issues" very much considering we're all grown-ups. Thomas' comments weren't very flattering, but I'd imagine they're more substantive than "larger" issues that can be traced back to wearing a flagpin. Sheesh. :rolleyes:

    ~ CB
     
  10. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    OBJECTIVE reality
    #10
    I'm sorry, but this is hardly even worth my time to refute, as the veracity of what I said is so obvious. It is incumbent upon you to show that we don't have a huge national debt to repay, that Bush and his pals don't defend corps over the common man, that our military is stronger for having been stretched thin through multiple tours of duty in a bull**** war, and that Dubya & Co. are law-abiding, Constitution-respecting citizens.

    Given seven long years of evidence to the contrary, you have an enormous mountain to climb to prove that.
     
  11. Antares macrumors 68000

    Antares

    #11
    I don't disagree about the military being stretched too thin. And the whole post-war Iraq thing was definitely mismanaged and il-planned. There's a lot that went wrong. But this is a whole different tangent that we can go on (from the flag pin topic)..... And I also agree with you about the constitutionality tight rope that the current administration has walked. Without Iraq, I think we would have been signing Bush's praises. The whole Iraq thing has prevented the administration from fully focusing on topics and issues that really needed/still need attention.

    Specifically, it was the: "putting Americans into Deep Debt" part that is false. By the wording, I was actually thinking that you were referring to people's personal debt and not national debt. But even if you are referring to national debt, it's still not the debt of Americans. Instead, it's that of the Federal Government. The US is not a true democracy. So, people can't own the national debt. But, yeah, that's a technicality. Regardless, it doesn't matter who is President. No President can put people into debt. People can only put themselves into debt.

    Oh, and it's more like 5 years (to the 7 that you mentioned). The first few years of Bush's Presidency were pretty good, by anyone's standard.
     
  12. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #12
    Who gets to pay the national debt then if it's not going to come out of our taxes? Sure every election the candidates talk about trimming the budget and cutting programs that don't work, yet government seems to grow every year. A not so small portion of our taxes goes towards paying the interest on the debt while we keep borrowing more and cutting taxes since that's the band-aid that fixes everything. At some point either the government is really going to have to cut back or taxes are going to go up and probably a combination of both. Right now at over $9 trillion it works out to over $30,000 for every man, woman, and child in this country.

    I don't necessarily think debt is bad but if there don't seem to be any plans to pay for it and we just keep forking over interest payments while borrowing more, we're eventually going to wear out our welcome with our lenders and have to do something. I'd rather start doing something now then wait until we don't have any options and have to take more drastic action.
     
  13. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    Pocket Universe, nth Dimensional Complex Manifold
    #13
    I certainly read it as "National debt", and excuse me... "--it's still not the debt of Americans. Instead, it's that of the Federal Government"??? Wow. My turn to make a face... :eek: It's not ONLY our debt, but its the debt of our children and our childrens children. Clinton had us in VERY good shape and we had a surplus (as per our budget projections).

    Now, we're in such deep deficit, as well as social security being under-funded, that we're well on our way to insolvency in my opinion. Targetting predatory lending practices (they say credit card debt is the next thing to burst), should have been a priority for Bush. Not to save people who mismanaged their money, but to spare our economy from the ravages of bad fiscal policy on a national scale.

    Bush "goosed" the economy to be artificially pumped up. But its not all on his shoulders, but Clinton before him worked on other priorities. It was Bush's responsibility to make the next steps in making us STRONG. These days, the dollar is looking pretty weak, simply to let us maintain some pretense of normalcy before he runs out of office.

    ~ CB
     
  14. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #14
    What's that?

    Not exactly, but talking heads like to use it since they don't have a lot of interesting legitimate things to say about Obama. Especially what you can't also say about McCain, or almost anyone else. There are legitimate complaints, but most of them are pretty minor and don't make good blipverts. By talking about the flag pin, among other things, they can allude to the fact that he's unAmerican, maybe even infer some sort of Muslim (which somehow equals terrorist) or whatever else. The actual flag pin itself is irrelevant. It represents stuff. Or tries to. Even if it really doesn't.
     
  15. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #15
    Yeah, I guess I can see this. Probably the same people that call Obama "Hussein"? :rolleyes:

    On the other hand, because McCain will run for the Republicans, and he is so far within the party from the Michael Savage crowd, it will be interesting to see how the talking heads try to support him during gen elec season.
     
  16. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    OBJECTIVE reality
    #16
    Oh, they'll fall back on what they're best at: hypocrisy.

    Rush Limbaugh, for example, hates McCain. During the first half of the primary season, Rush was angry, upset, positively apoplectic that McCain was looking like he'd win the Republican nomination. You could actually see Rush's face turn purple, and the steam blowing out of his ears, on the radio.

    Now, of course, Rush will be a big McCain supporter. :rolleyes:
     
  17. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #17
    And what larger issue is that? Are you suggesting that Obama is not a patriot?
     
  18. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #18
    I didn't get an answer either. Guessing it's an implication that he isn't. Well good news, he relented and wore an flag pin. Weeks ago apparently. Personally, I'm kinda disappointed. I liked that he was standing up and saying patriotism is more than a pin, which seemed to be working as it wasn't as much an issue as some people were making it. At least among people who wouldn't vote for him anyway. But subtlety can be easily lost on such things. No one noticed anyway, though it's not like it would do him any good even if they did.
     

Share This Page