Community rallies behind child molester

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Mar 8, 2014.

  1. 63dot, Mar 8, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2014

    63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #1
    Where I live in a small town a child molester who is famous or at least accomplished in the entertainment world gets people on his side and they back him no matter what. He's a very great musician! In my small town where there is nobody famous or accomplished still see past that flaw he has for the young, like Steven Tyler or Ted Nugent.

    I guess small towns are like this and I can see if somebody "like" a John Hinckley Jr. or Son of Sam or similar infamous person lived there how it would put the town on the map and the town feels indebted to that infamous person. I don't know how many infamous people are from small towns but given enough time, people forget the bad and even make that person a hero and they go from a Bonnie and Clyde most wanted to Bonnie and Clyde American folk hero.

    Even though teenage girls complained about this talented musician/teacher/mentor as well as their parents and he got fired, he was still the star who worked with everybody in show business and the town is still largely proud. Without any better examples of this phenomenon, just think Michael Jackson. He obviously molested or tried to molest young boys (and allegedly girls, too) but people knowing this still saw him as the great Michael Jackson. This worship of talented people no matter what their flaws is alarming to me. What is just as bad is that people who criticize Michael in the least become shunned and ostracized.

    When this collusion pissed me off, small townies who are his good friends of this thought they could threaten me and I have seen this all before.

    It's sickening!

    Why do otherwise law abiding simple folk worship such flawed people but don't tolerate that in a non-famous person? Do the talented and glorious live by different rules?
     
  2. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #2
    He's "WINNING", plain and simple.

    It's the American Way, which is where I assume this town is.
     
  3. 63dot, Mar 8, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2014

    63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #3
    Yes it is, unfortunately. Also in Northern California, how about this gem (about a well liked professor) and as a disclaimer it's very disturbing but typical of small town California that will do anything to protect their talented, smart, or beautiful people:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCiIxLSt4h0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njql6LuU0ns

    I found this guy's video blog on youtube and I don't know him but I agree with his conclusions about the dog case. People I have met from other areas, big and small, have commented for years that they have never met such unfriendly and scary people as those in small hamlets in the northern part of the state as evidenced by blogs like this:

    http://www.city-data.com/forum/monterey-county/1124673-why-people-monterey-so-friggin-hostile.html

    To many these small norcal towns be it Salinas or Marin or Monterey a little scarier than big, bad Los Angeles who is no stranger to crime. I have plenty of bad to say against LA, San Jose, or SF but at least there's some standard of civility and a populace who knows the rest of America looks down on racism, sexism, and homophobia. I have met fellow minorities who moved back to areas with bad reputations to get away from small town norcal. Now the larger cities like SF are very, very tolerant but 15 minutes out of the city and then you are in a different area with different points of view. Nobody is looking at them so outdated ways are still the norm.

    I call it typical, see dog story above, but to these type of really twisted people, unlike the big bank robbers in the big cities, it's actually the small townies who do wrong do so in a twisted way. Not that it's good to hit a bank for a mil in NY or Chicago but the baby eaters and the Ed Gein types seem to love the small town thing. It's as if they know they can't hit the big city bank or go big so they go small but really twisted. I know there are plenty of awful things in the big city and I saw bad stuff in SF and London but the small town deviants who are violent scare me much, much more.
     
  4. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    #4
    looks at the small down football players even taking movies of the assault/rape and getting little or any punishment for it.
     
  5. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #5
    The cult of celebrity is the new religion for the 21st Century. :cool:
     
  6. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #6
    I truly can't say if MJ is guilty or not.

    Look at R Kelly, a great album shorty after the tape leaked made people forget quickly, until Dave Chappelle reminded everyone again. :p
     
  7. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #7
    I never saw it that way but it makes sense.
     
  8. ElectronGuru macrumors 65816

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    Oregon, USA
    #8
    This is the result of culture and technology.

    For thousands of years, if you were famous, it was because you had power and ability to accomplished things (power -> fame). If the king one town over liked kids at little to much, you knew better than to criticize someone who could have you drawn and quartered because it was tuesday. Giving famous people a pass was a key survival strategy.

    Then along came audio and video reproduction (film/records/video). You could suddenly be famous without first having power (fame -> power). But culture changes much more slowly and we've not yet adapted. It takes more than 100 years to unlearn a 1000 years of conditioning. So celebrities are still revered as though they have power, whether or not they do.
     
  9. TheAppleFairy macrumors 68020

    TheAppleFairy

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    #9
    Great now I have piss on you stuck in my head, thanks.

    Drip drip drip


    [​IMG]
     
  10. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #10
    Anyway I learned a lesson that I suspected before. The famous or talented or rich have a different standard of law, rules, etc. You don't have to look further than OJ Simpson or Bill Gates (big Microsoft monopoly fiasco).

    At the top, you have the alleged wrongdoings of Clinton and Whitewater, Bush and just about everything, and Obama and unclear connections in Chicago and had it been just you or me, we would have been slammed. I now look at Chris Christie and his scandal du jour and being who he is it's likely he will shed that quite easily. Had he been a governor not running for POTUS they may have took down his career. But as long as there are powerful people behind him, and many standard bearer GOP funders like his chances, then the NJ scandal will just go away while many of us will be confused. There 's just a different standard for those who have admirers.
     
  11. tshrimp macrumors 6502

    tshrimp

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    #11
    Would definitely not classify as "The American Way". One town backing this dweeb does not represent all of America.
     
  12. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #12
    So, you dispute that winning is all important to most Americans?

    Perhaps, but the minority that practice this philosophy give the others a black-eye.

    A local dinner theatre is showing "Help I Married An American", and I couldn't help but chuckle when I drove by the sign. The possibilities are myriad.
     
  13. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #13
    Roman Polanski drugged and anal raped a 13-year-old girl.

    Hear it from Hollywood, he's a genius worthy of praise and a pardon.
     
  14. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #14
    For me, I want to dispute you but I can't find anything noteworthy to argue against your statement. Unfortunately for the USA from what I have seen (maybe other places, too) the idea of winning is almost everything. I leave a little space for the good and noble things in people, but still winning seems to be the major concept of this age for this culture.
     
  15. RedCroissant Suspended

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    #15
    I checked out that blog and it is HILARIOUS. I say that because this blogger/thread starter "visits" Monterey once or twice a year to see "friends" and has time to judge an entire populace based on how little time was spent there.

    I actually lived there from 2002- 2004 and my wife lived there from 2003-2005. It was AMAZING there. Just amazing. Sure the wharf is small compared to larger tourist cities and the goods there cater to the unknowing tourist, but it's beautiful, the prices aren't as bad or nearly as high as that poster said, and the people are in fact very nice. The key is not to be an antagonist.
     
  16. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #16
    No, no!! Monterey is absolutely awful. Full of old, fat, ugly, hostile people. "inter_dimensional" is absolutely right -- much better to visit LA where all the young, beautiful, cool people live. Whatever you do, don't visit Monterey, and, if you do, spend one night a year at most. Maybe we can play a game, where all the places in the world are listed that don't have enough beautiful, cool, young people. :cool:


    On the original topic -- sometimes it is pretty hard to tell if someone is just being falsely accused, or, is an exceptionally good liar.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/03/10/288580904/blood-will-out-reveals-secrets-of-a-murderous-master-manipulator
     
  17. 63dot, Mar 18, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014

    63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #17
    Results will vary. I have been here 50 years so maybe I have seen more of the seasons of good and bad. The bloggers who totally hate on Monterey County and see no good should probably turn their hatred towards DC or Detroit if they want a truly bad city on a lot of levels. But I have also lived in West London and socal in a couple of nice places (Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo) and they were still pretty much cheaper than Monterey County. It's a good place to visit or live for a short period of time like you did. It's not usually a good place to make a career and raise a family.

    That being said, Salinas, our county seat, is relatively low crime for city of its size, and has a lot of good paying jobs with a lot of legal, agricultural, and industrial jobs. I have a couple of professional friends who made the short 30 minute move to get the better jobs. It's much higher for those types of jobs than anywhere outside of San Jose without the full on congestion of Silicon Valley. We have a pretty good diversity in Salinas that has been made better with nearby Marina's California State University Monterey Bay. There is a small section of Salinas, East Salinas, which has had some bad gang problems but overall outside of that area, it's a pretty good place to live.

    Gilroy, near Salinas, has come up a lot and has a great Garlic festival and is increasingly becoming a place for burned out San Jose techies who can't stomach the center of the motherboard of the valley and the stress that is in the air. I can't really explain the feeling in Silicon Valley but you have to be there. The good thing is if you can thrive there you become Ellison, Jobs, or Woz.

    Conde Nast has often put Salinas as California's best city to live in for California, and sometimes the only California entrant, into its best American cities to live. I think the only other city to list there more than once was Stockton (before the hard hit recession). A little off topic but when the economy comes back, Stockton will be a great place to invest in where Northern California oil, agriculture, and banking all meet at a focal point there. But I think Southern California will rebound sooner and bigger.
     
  18. RedCroissant Suspended

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    #18
    I just think that blogger was a little crazy to judge an entire population based on what little time was spent there.

    And I lived in Baltimore and the DC area as well and can say that the people in my area were still mostly very nice. What I ran into more in that are a was low grade racism.

    Salinas is nice and if I could afford to live in the area, then I would. In my opinion, nothing beats a good 75-85 avg year round temperature and the ocean.

    The only way that I could ever live near Gilroy is if I had my sense of smell surgically altered to not be able to smell garlic. Sure, my blood would be awesome and that area is probably free of vampires and such, but just making the drive through there is enough for me.
     
  19. 63dot, Mar 18, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014

    63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #19
    As for racism, I am in mixed race marriage and I am Asian, and Monterey County is like anywhere else and slightly less tolerant than our neighbors Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, and SF counties which are liberal and more open minded.

    Salinas, as it has become more diverse is pretty good for the most part. When you move into the more white areas near the ocean, it's pretty well known to be unfriendly to Jews (my wife), Asians, Hispanics, and African Americans. Pebble Beach used to be the symbol of rich, white, and republican but even that has changed. But many friends of mine, from south, midwest, and even other countries who are white were aware of the racism here, which may not be low grade but it's quite institutionalized. It's a shock to drive from UC Santa Cruz and then end up in Monterey. Two different world views. CNN and major news outlets sometimes come here and talk about us still having had anti-mixed marriage laws and anti-gay laws in the coastal towns near Monterey. We still have a no-Semitic clause in Pacific Grove and the city council refused to kill that law. Anywhere else in California would have changed things but this is Monterey so a quick Google on race relations will give one an understanding. We had a Chinese population once but they got burned out of the area, and not long ago. We voted for Obama, too but this area tolerates a black president while Santa Cruz celebrates him. Different concepts, indeed.

    A man who started an all white town in Georgia considered coming here because his backwards attitude got him to be hated even in Forsythe County and much of the south which is trying to make an effort to change. Who would have thought during the 1960s and civil rights that we would have LBJ bring in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and a few good ole boys like Carter, Clinton, and Gore become liberal stars in the democratic party? Times change for sure.

    The all white mayor from Georgia instantly saw Monterey County as a good place to go, or to some all white enclave in Oregon or Washington. Orange County looked like easy pickin's too. Anywhere that is 90+% percent white may be a good place to house a Klansman or similar type of person. I guess some of the old guard racism that used to run freely in the south is no longer welcome there but there's plenty of west coast nazi types here (whether blue collar or even country club) as long as it's not too close to LA, San Diego, San Francisco, Oakland, or San Jose. We are a blue state around the populations centers but pretty much redneck and reactionary anywhere else. This could be California but I suspect any state in the USA.

    Salinas, compared to nation and California, is expensive and has become much more so, but it's still a bargain (comparatively) to coastal towns nearby. There's just not that much industry overall to justify the higher rents and mortgages in Monterey. I think a lot of big Silicon Valley money buys stuff up here and before the computer industry, I don't remember anyone thinking Monterey as expensive but actually as an artist's colony but that's way, way back.

    In recent years, we have had the first people of Indian and Pakistani descent start making Monterey County*their home, or second home to primary home in Silicon Valley. I like the new diversity but while they feel comfortable around white, educated people in high tech, they may find it quite different around white Monterey people.

    I think the blogger probably zeroed in on this racism here. Many*may not see it but metropolitan Californians see it as the most obvious negative thing they see when coming to Monterey.
     
  20. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #20
    Yeah, but legally they cannot enforce it. And I'm sure there are plenty of Jews living there. Honestly it's surprising to hear about anything like that in California.
     
  21. 63dot, May 10, 2014
    Last edited: May 10, 2014

    63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #21
    I think those who don't know California see just a liberal blue state but the open minded views come from the SF, LA, and San Jose areas. Even the major cities in republican San Diego and Orange County are progressive. But a lot of the no-man's land in between those regions, and far enough inland are reactionary right wing and have the typical skinheads or klan. I live in one of those less populated counties (Monterey) where there are areas a person of color absolutely avoids.

    I remember soldiers from the local military base who have grown up in the south who were shocked to hear of the white pride activities that happened outside of the metro areas. When you hear about a heinous race based crime in the USA, California still leads the headlines on CNN. Of course we are the largest state by far so we are going to have the most stories of almost any topic on CNN compared to other states, but racism is alive and well here and I would argue more so than anywhere else. With a large influx of Asians (who started with my relatives who were interned in WWII) and a large number of people coming from just across the border of southern California, race relations have always been pretty volatile.

    In the 1990s when the klan was reconstituted in different areas around the USA in larger numbers, the Southern law poverty center ranked us once with the most members. While I didn't see the klan growing up, an employee of mine did confess to me that in his youth he was a member. I had another employee who was an ex-skinhead. Again I am not in San Jose or SF and they as well be as far away as Mars even though we share the same state.
     

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