Corporate Apple? Hiring Indian Programmers

arn

macrumors god
Original poster
Staff member
Apr 9, 2001
14,506
1,789
According to this BusinessWeek article, Apple is looking into to corporate market:

Now, Apple has quietly made its next move. It has signed up a number of software developers in India to write business applications for OS X and port over (that's geek talk for "convert") existing Unix or Windows programs. Apple has kept quiet about this plan. News of the deal broke in the Financial Express, one of India's leading English-language business dailies. B Mahendran, Apple's country manager for India, told the paper that the company plans "to break into the serious business applications segment."
 

eyelikeart

Moderator emeritus
Jan 2, 2001
11,897
0
Metairie, LA
I honestly don't think Apple is going to make a big impact in the corporate world....esp. these days with the cut-backs & decreasing of everything....

graphic professionals & education I feel is what's going to remain their breadwinners....

and who knows what else they have planned for the consumer electronics area?
 

Taft

macrumors 65816
Jan 31, 2002
1,319
0
Chicago
Financial.

I work in the financial industry (more specifically the trading industry) and from my experience, the majority of the financial world relies on a few key programs. Bloomberg, AT Financial, Excel, a few exchange specific real-time apps, etc.

My point is that unless Apple can port these, the major players in the field, I can't see them making a dent.

Maybe I'm wrong...I hope they prove me wrong.:)

Matthew
 

mgescuro

macrumors member
Feb 19, 2002
39
0
Silicon Valley
Why Not???

Why can't APple make a slow, yet credible, comeback into the business segment?? Who knows what's down the road from now!! I mean, Apple's some a very long way since 1997.

First, Apple needed to rebuild itself as a credible hardware manufacturer. IT's done that. Now it's software. With it's iApps, it has begun building the foundtation.

We all have to remember that Apple just isn't computers. There's a LOT that is Apple. There's the QuickTime family of products, WebObjects, and to some extent FileMaker.

Who's to say that Apple can't have ported the most crucial business applications?? Bloomberg, AT FInancial, etc. Who cares about Microsoft Outlook?? Lotus has already ported Notes to OS X. Oracle's already developing tooks to run on OS X. Running and accessing Oracle databases on OS X, that's a major step in my book. What if APple is having Corel WOrdPerfect Suite ported over?? I mean, it already exists in the Linux world.

THing is, we just don't know what's going on or how APple's going to fit this into it's Digital Hub Strategy -- or even if it's going to fit into that strategy.

Just wait and see.
 

sparkleytone

macrumors 68020
Oct 28, 2001
2,307
0
Greensboro, NC
corel no longer contributes to the open source community and their UNIX/clone business is likely to disappear now that m$ owns a big chunk of them.
 

frogmella

macrumors newbie
Jan 6, 2002
22
0
StarOffice?

Apple's quite friendly with Sun - possibly they're porting Star/OpenOffice onto Mac OS X. I mean, a really decent Aqua-themed version which can give Office a run for its money. If M$ really does stop development of Mac Office, Apple would need something kick-ass to prove it's still viable. Compatible file formats, similar interface, no clippy....
 

prechrchet

macrumors regular
Mar 5, 2002
156
0
Going into the business world could reap major dividens for Apple, but they would have to take the right approach. If they can capture a significant portion of the small business market, we've got a real shot. These businesses are just starting out and hopefully will grow, and if they start with Apple they will buy more Macs as time progresses. However, big businesses that already have zillions of PCs are not likely to make a major switch to Mac because of the cost involved.

Just my two cents.

Prechrchet
 

Kela

macrumors 6502
May 12, 2001
287
0
US
Yeah, I dont see apple breaking into the corporate world because not only does it have to port over financial programs like Excel, Bloomberg, e.t.c but what about biting into the 90 or more percent of market share that windows has? I mean, all thees users including coglomerates use Excel e.t.c but on windows. THe key is to MAKE them switch over to the base (i.e OSX) and then they have no other choice. I don't see this happening. do you?
-Kela
 

eyelikeart

Moderator emeritus
Jan 2, 2001
11,897
0
Metairie, LA
I love Apple.....but u have to realize corporate world makes their money by not overspending....hence Wintel boxes....

Apple's computers are incredible machines....but frankly they would be overkill for them.....and they are just too expensive.....
 

crassusad44

macrumors 6502a
Nov 30, 2001
546
0
Scandinavia
Not too bad

Many smaller firms are looking towards Apple, because they are sick of M$ and the new licensing agreement (lease software, not own it and update when you want...). But the Mac OS platform lacks software they can use. This might be a good thing, and over time it could mean a bigger market share for Apple...

I hope.... :)
 

badtzmat

macrumors newbie
Jan 23, 2002
5
0
NYC
small corporate is key

i think everyone is focusing on the large corporate machine. i think apple is looking at small corporations. of course the large corps will not reinvest in a new enviroment. it is just not cost effective to switch 400 machines to a totally new system. what about those small and midsize and all those entreprenurial enterprises that don't have access to a full range of apps and/or competition of apps in the business realm. this could be key. the education market works for apple because it gives them access to the next generation of business owners. the same goes true for the small corps that grow into the next large corps.

quite smart i think.
 

Xapplimatic

macrumors 6502
Oct 23, 2001
417
0
California
I agree with badtzmat..

Apple's stratedgy isn't to break corporate arms.. it's to grow into the future corporate structure by starting with small and medium sized business needs.. Look at the progress its making:

IT: Mac has all the software needed to handle web production and hosting
for small to medium sized companies.

Advertising: Again, total solution for everything from print to radio to video.

Movie / Television: Given. This is strengthening every day. Rumors now that
Apple may be even buying out Alias/Wavefront (Maya).

Scientific: Plenty of apps for lots of different science stuff.. Recently Apple
made hay from its progress into bio-engineering software being the
fastest on G4s.

University: Given. Science and programming solutions abound. My local
college's entire science department just purged all their PCs and now
has an all iMacs and PowerMacs. Language department also deploys
Mac-only. The only PCs on campus are relegated to public terminals
status for students to check email and surf the web.. Apple's hold on
the education market is fairly strong.. and getting stronger all the time
with the iBook/PowerBook mobile computing programs and what new
education software they intend to announce this month...

Law: Law offices are using Macs at much higher precentages than even
consumers are. 25% of all law firms use Macs and growing.. There is
even an entire Mac lawyer discussion site which reviews Mac software.

This is just a start.. there's no reason why Apple can't expand its circle of
small to medium sized company strongholds.. OS X has given a firm way to do just that. I think putting India on porting apps is a good idea as long as people over here don't have to call India for tech support!!!! (Like Compaq!)
 

TechLarry

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2002
142
0
This isn't about taking over Corporate America.

I work in IT in a Corporate Environment. Believe me, it ain't going to happen.

However, there is no reason Apple can't EXTEND it's user base in Corporate America.

Apple isn't out to kill off Microsoft. They will have to wait for Microsoft to do that themselves (and they've recently had a fair start at it). If Microsoft ever _does_ go down the tubes, he who is best positioned at the time wins.

TL
 

game boy 64

macrumors newbie
Mar 9, 2002
3
0
London
nextstep + openstep + ...

apple, thro next, has a wealth of experience with ****step, and its use in big finance houses (at least in europe). this would be a sensible move to leverage these significant resources. remember, apple didn't just buy an os, but all that went with that os.
 

Foocha

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2001
588
0
London
Why not?

I think Apple may be approaching this from a "Why not?" perspective. There's a lot of talent in India, and the costs are relatively low. There's a lot of great UNIX software out there that could deliver benefits to the SOHO / SME sectors if it was ported to OS X and given an easy to use user interface. So why not make a modest investment in this area an see what comes of it.

One of the most important and understated facts of OS X is that you've got Microsoft Office (including Excel!!) running on a UNIX based operating system - this is unique, and could be the door opener for Apple to parts of the business sector that it could never have reached with OS 9.

I very much doubt this is Apple's strategy for challenging Microsoft - having Office and Internet Explorer on the platform is key to OS X's future, ensuring interoperability with the Microsoft-based rest of the world.

Apple buying the Microsoft Macintosh Business Unit is an interesting idea, providing they buy with it the MBU's key asset - its access to Microsoft's development resources. With some further investment from Apple, perhaps the MBU could plug some gaps in its product line up. Key business apps I want to see on OS X: Outlook, Project, Visio. Funnily enough, they're all Microsoft products! Hmmm.

If Apple seriously wants to attract large corporates there are two things they need to address - more business apps (sounds like they're on the case here) and an Intel version of OS X (doubt we'll ever see that one, but imagine if we did...)
 

game boy 64

macrumors newbie
Mar 9, 2002
3
0
London
ms office on os x isn't quite office on unix. there's layers of apple technology there too. remember, apple's had mac emulators available for years (on sparc solaris, hp, etc), so, for example classic isn't all that new. adding that mac emulation technology to nextstep over-trivialises the issues, however...

the apple technology is important because it adds significant value to developers, whilst sitting on top of predictable, reliable unix technology. business tools aren't just about the desktop apps. they're about reliability, manageability and the long-term view of compatibility.

now, smp with many more processors (thanks to mach) is viable, allowing apple to venture places that sun and ibm go, with their big boxes; so is there a market for apple servers with value-added services? if i can integrate our current quark-to-xml (and back) technology throughout an enterprise, i for one will be happy, and we'll be able to talk with even more customers (which is why apple is there for us).
 

Foocha

macrumors 6502a
Jul 10, 2001
588
0
London
Office v.X is certainly a version of Office running on a UNIX operating system. Of course it uses Apple's Carbon framework, but this does not mean it's running in some kind of emulation. My point is not that there now exists a version of Office for UNIX, but that it is signifiant for Apple that they are the only vendors of a UNIX OS which Microsoft develops for - and this has to give them a better position in corporate markets than OS 9 ever did!

With regards to OS X's chances as a server OS - sure its more suitable as a server than OS 9, and in design and education environments where they have increasingly been selecting NT servers for their Mac networks, OS X Server has an opportunity to gain some ground. However, OS X's real benefit over, say Linux, is its GUI & application support - but these applications are desktop applications rather than servers. OS X sounds like an expensive choice for a server when Linux is free, and you're never going to see that pretty Aqua interface if your server is screwed into a rack somewhere and you Telnet to it.

OS X is rapidly becoming the most popular destop UNIX and this presents an opportunity for Apple to reach a new corporate niche market (niche marketing is where Apple excels). This market comprises of anyone who may want UNIX on their desktop but still needs Office & other destkop apps (like software developers, for example). Previously they needed two machines, a Linux one and a Windows one - with OS X they only need one.