Corporate personality tests??

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Dec 27, 2014.

  1. 63dot, Dec 27, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2014

    63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    norcal
    #1
    E-meter, Landmark and/or Forum training, Intellius and personality type tests in general:

    I have come across some of these tests in corporate environments and with enough research, they all seem to point to L. Ron Hubbard as source or major influence. I am not saying he's good or bad, but why hide the Hubbard roots to well known tests in government, military, and corporate America? I have come from training, BA in HR/personnel management, which is very non-judgmental when it comes to personality tests and am only expected to accept them when it helps a company or it's an integral part of a company's culture. There's no real mention of Hubbard and/or controversy and academia, at least when it comes to HR studies, purposefully does not take a stand on the elephant in the room, L. Ron Hubbard.

    The only other time I have come across this type of "denial" was dealing with Amway companies. They would not come out and say "Amway" or "multi-level marketing" and would use some other name for the company, which belonged to Amway, or use less intrusive terms like direct marketing, or direct level marketing. But when I ask about Hubbard or Amway (not related btw) among people deep in a related organization, they get extremely defensive in a North Korea type of way.

    To me this is pretty scary, and I thought about getting this book:

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Cult-Personality-Testing-Misunderstand/dp/0743280725
     
  2. macquariumguy macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
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    Sarasota FL
    #2
    My company used to do the Myers Briggs tests on everyone, but I haven't seen/heard of it in a few years now, so perhaps they've given it up. Biggest waste of time ever.

    I used to go into those things and purposely answer every question the opposite of what I really felt. The funny thing was after the test when you got your letter "grades" everyone would agree that mine were really representative of me. Bunch of hokum.

    On the comment sheets I always suggested that next time we all do each others horoscopes. I think maybe they finally got a clue.
     
  3. Zxxv macrumors 68040

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    #3
    maybe thats the right result after all. The test knew you would do it ;)
    :)
     
  4. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #4
    I've had to do some recently, I kinda like them.

    We all spend our time lying to ourselves that they should cut through some of that ******** if you answer them honestly.
     
  5. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #5
    I think the personality tests are really more of an intelligence test. I remember back in high school when a new place would open up in town that everyone wanted to work at, everyone would apply online and I would always get calls back and some of my friends never did because they were too stupid to know how to lie on their personality tests. Thanks to being a master liar and magically avoiding every drug test along the way, I've been happily working since 15 years old. :D
     
  6. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

    Joined:
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    #6
    E-meter is a Scientology thing. Landmark/Forum are some kind of successors to "est". I'm surprised it is still active. Isn't "Intelius" a background-check company? Kind of a different animal.

    As for more mainstream testing, there are tests like Myers-Briggs. Been there, done that. Taking these tests as part of some kind of bonding/training exercise is basically recreational, wouldn't you say? I guess it could be a problem if some misguided sales manager thought he wanted everyone in sales to be hyper-outgoing. In that case, I would think the exercise a good indicator that it is time to start looking for a more functional manager to work for. ;)

    It is doubtful if any of those tests have much significance. How widespread is it to place a lot of weight on these tests? I would assume that it would be for new hires? Young new hires?

    I think the new style of tests that can uncover hidden biases are at least interesting. e.g. Implicit Association Tests.

    https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/

    These tests may have serious potential for helping people understand themselves better. Which, some people find interesting, and, other people find disconcerting.
     
  7. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #7
    I had the opportunity to use Intellis a couple of times. One led me to "pass" as a strong candidate and that led to a second test, this time Dianetics.

    The other time I tried Intellius, and this time a different company, I didn't get a call back but then got spammed by the Scientologists for many months. Both that business, who only claims one owner as a Scientologist but not Scientology in general, also partners with a local school and what they both have in common is the dire need to ban all psychological drugs. While not eye to eye on everything, they are definitely allied against western medicine and the FDA. The Scientology callbacks were quite annoying. I think there's a lot of cross pollination here but when in the personality test realm, Scientology has a lot of irons in the fire. They are the elephant in the room but also one that people find a great deal avoiding to piss off. While I may not be a fan, I can't fault their organization or their persistence. While some may be annoyed, you can't argue with success and success is something Scientology is used to.
     
  8. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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  9. jbachandouris macrumors 68040

    jbachandouris

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    #9
    How much weight? Too much. When companies have 100's or even 1000's of applications, anything they can use to weed people out will help them decide.

    The last time I took a similar test, I was told by the hiring manager that the test wasn't his sole criteria for hiring, yet after the test, I never heard from him again.
     
  10. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    Sep 9, 2010
    #10
    I’m of course from a simpler time, no tests for me, my father was a personal friend of the Chairman of the Board.:p
     
  11. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #11
    I was certified to present the Myers-Briggs indicator a good number of years ago. Please note that it is an "indicator" not a "test". There is a good bit of scientific research behind it, but at the end of the day, it's not real practical. It can help you understand yourself and if you understand it well enough, it can help you understand others, but it's a small part of a larger picture.

    Like all other corporate trends (Who Moved my Cheese, Fish!, TAXI, I could go on and on...), these personality assessments come and go. Real Colors, DiSC, and Myers-Briggs are the big ones, though there others.

    We were warned in the training about overusing these indicators or ascribing more relivance to the results than we should.

    First off, the accuracy of any indicator is going to be related to the age, maturity, honesty, and education of the participant. We did Real Colors with a room full of 8th graders. Surprise, surprise - they turned out to be 90% Orange. They ended up being what they wanted to be instead of what they really were. They were just too immature to be doing this indicator.

    Second, people are really complicated beings. Mental disorders, stress, life experience, and even our ability to adapt to situations and pretend makes pigeon-holeing people by personality type a feudal task.

    Finally, socially engineering a work place using personality types is like herding cats. Sort teams by personality type (either mixing different types or matching them) and you are likely to be missing something from the room or ignoring skill sets that the personality assessments can't measure. Not to mention the questionable accuracy of self reported assessments!

    Like I said before, it's a nice tool if you know how to use it. One of the best examples I've seen is "The Platinum Rule". It's a sales philosophy that uses a watered down Myers-Briggs to identify how to best to communicate with a potential client at their level. But when you dig into it, you realize you use it every day but didn't know someone put a name and a copyright on it!
     
  12. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #12
    Where I used to work, at least in my department, we took on something like 60 people a year, mostly in part time slots. Three of the people I started with (all from the bottom of the totem pole), that is, with a few months of, stayed there as long as I did, 19 years. We saw a lot of turn-over, but for those of us who could/did stay there for more than a few years, it was a pretty comfortable place to work.

    If you have that kind of "luxury", the option of hiring a lot of people to find the crew that clicks, it can turn out well. But these companies do not want to (or simply cannot afford to) deal with that, they want to hire the right people right out of the gate. Hiring the right people in a collaborative work environment just cannot be done that way, IMEO, because you cannot scan personal chemistry from a piece of paper.
     
  13. 63dot, Dec 29, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2014

    63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #13
    I did mention I was not a fan of Scientology. But I dislike Intelius even more so I was thrilled to find out on the radio that the justice department was going balls to the walls against one of their founders. It turns out, he was selling personal information to other companies kind of like Apple's old nemesis, Microsoft. But not only personal info, which got ported out without permission, but the wonderful skimming of one's credit card and not easily being able to reverse charges. His work with databases, bank accounts, often illegally gleaned through "personality tests" and "background checks" helped build his multi-billion dollar empire. There's really no difference between a guy like that doing it under the radar and Kim Jong-un, who is a little less coy about his power/money grab.

    I think while extremely distasteful and abusive brilliantly employing the bait and switch with the best of them, both Scientology and Intelius, it's a stretch to say they are like Nazi Germany. But if Hitler came back as a sharp MBA focused on becoming bigger than Bill Gates, he would be the Intelius founder :) :

    http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2002198103_dotcon1main06.html
     
  14. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

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    日本
    #14
    We did a number of those. They were part of my companies leadership development in the past. I like those with indicators like Myers-Briggs or InsightsDiscovery :)D:cool::mad::))Where is not a good or bad ... Just indicating preferences. It helped me actually to sometimes understand my own and others behaviors better.
    With some colleagues we also shared more privately the result of enneagram.
     
  15. Septembersrain Contributor

    Septembersrain

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    Dec 14, 2013
    Location:
    Texas
    #15
    Our company uses Mattersight to gauge personality of employees and also our callers.
     
  16. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    May 21, 2012
    #16
    I wonder how Steve Jobs would have scored on any of these stupid things.
     
  17. ChristianJapan macrumors 601

    ChristianJapan

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    日本
    #17
    In the "Insights Discovery" color scheme I think his main preference would be red. http://www.fullcircletd.co.uk/insight-discovery/

    S. Wozniak as his counterpart I would think be greenish-blue.
     

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