Cuba's Fidel Castro knocks sweet-talking Obama after 'honey-coated' visit

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by thermodynamic, Mar 28, 2016.

  1. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #1
  2. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    This is just so instructive. From the article:

    HAVANA (Reuters) - Retired leader Fidel Castro accused U.S. President Barack Obama of sweet-talking the Cuban people during his visit to the island last week and ignoring the accomplishments of Communist rule, in an opinion piece carried by all state-run media on Monday.

    Obama's visit was aimed at consolidating a detente between the once intractable Cold War enemies and the U.S. president said in a speech to the Cuban people that it was time for both nations to put the past behind them and face the future "as friends and as neighbors and as family, together."

    "One assumes that every one of us ran the risk of a heart attack listening to these words," Castro said in his column, dismissing Obama's comments as "honey-coated" and reminding Cubans of the many U.S. efforts to overthrow and weaken the Communist government.

    Castro, 89, laced his opinion piece with nationalist sentiment and, bristling at Obama's offer to help Cuba, said the country was able to produce the food and material riches it needs with the efforts of its people.

    "We don't need the empire to give us anything," he wrote.
     
  3. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #3
    BREAKING: Fidel Castro now polling ahead of Ted Cruz in Wisconsin, 6% behind Trump.
     
  4. Eraserhead macrumors G4

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  5. chown33 macrumors 604

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    The Fidel bot is.
     
  6. aaronvan Suspended

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    Obama gets punked again. He also insulted Argentina by traipsing into town on their most solemn day of remembrance, thus making it all about him instead of the disappeared. Totally classless.
     
  7. Eraserhead macrumors G4

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    So should Obama have rearranged? Even though Argentinas government was apparently fine with it?
     
  8. Scepticalscribe, Mar 28, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    How tasteless, @Eraserhead, of you to raise something as singularly irrelevant as a salient fact into such a discussion.

    When I read the story, I wondered how long it would take for a thread on this subject to be started by……individuals with predictable views on such matters.

    To my mind, it is clear that President Obama is using his last year in office to try to defuse some very long standing foreign policy issues, and to try to normalise relations with some of these countries.

    Fidel Castro no longer leads Cuba, and hasn't done so for some time: he may be respected, revered even in some quarters, but, politically, his views are no longer those that govern policy formation in that country.
     
  9. aaronvan Suspended

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    Of course the corrupt Argentine government was fine with it. The people certainly weren't, however, and especially not the families of the disappeared.
     
  10. thewitt macrumors 68020

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    Normalized relations with Cuba won't last as long as Castro continues to run the government with the iron first of communism. Liberal, naive Americans believe that all we have to do is apologize and Cuba will welcome us with open arms.

    Not going to happen without another revolution in Cuba.

    There is no fundamental difference between the Castro brothers, as any Cuban refugee will quickly tell you.

    It will be interesting to see what the first government backlash is, but mark my words, there will be a backlash.
     
  11. Renzatic Suspended

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    I seriously doubt it. Communism has failed, and the only thing Cuba has going for it is that they're the last of the hold outs (and that vaccine, which is pretty interesting). But let's look at Castro's little tantrum here and see it for what it actually is: one old man's big wet fart in an empty wind tunnel. It means nothing, influences nothing. It's Castro railing against the inevitable quiet shuffling away from his failed utopian dream.
     
  12. tunerX Suspended

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    So you are saying in a communist country, when the dictator willingly steps down, he no longer has any say? Fidel wasn't subjected to a coup. The only way I could find any validity in what you posted is if Raul has ever publicly denounced anything ever spoken or written by Fidel after Fidel's retirement.

    I'll wait for any aftermath from Fidel's statements. If Raul is truly in charge then he will issue some kind of statement that is in disagreement with Fidel. I am pretty sure that will not happen.
     
  13. Eraserhead macrumors G4

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    You are aware Argentina is a democracy and has been for some time?

    Why? Who cares what Fidel has to say?
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    Not necessarily.

    Not any more than GWB would have publicly dissented with the policies pursued by his father, GHWB, - although he may have pursued radically different ones - or President Obama may have distanced himself publicly from policies espoused by President Clinton. That is not how it is done, not even in the sainted, blessed, revered USA.

    Fidel may well still be held in high esteem by many, and it would be utter foolishness to seek to alienate them. In this instance, you look to see what Raul Castro does, rather than what he says.

    However, I never cease to be astounded at the rigid, doctrinaire, judgemental tone of many of the conservative posters on here. It is not just that they are blinded and blinkered and in thrall to their ideology, it is that they simply do not have much of an idea how politics, power and protocol actually work.

    As for coups, even those in the US - granted, past masters at engineering coups in the central and southern regions of the South American continental landmass - should know that securing the succession - or tweaking the succession can be achieved by means other than coups.

    What matters for now is that Cuba managed a peaceful succession and transition in the absence of war, revolution, assassination, coups, or, for that matter, legitimate elections.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 29, 2016 ---
    Again, @Eraserhead, facts. You keep raising them. Whatever have they to do with a clueless political discussion? You might disturb the benign tranquillity of closed and hermetically sealed minds.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 29, 2016 ---
    Actually, it may be a little more subtle than that. It could well be Fidel reassuring the faithful, or it could be Fidel registering a note of dissent at the more flexible foreign policy pursued by his sibling.

    Either way, it is good for Cuba that this is aired - it allows for it to be discussed and explored - and it is also good to see that this mindset no longer rules the country, or has any serious say in how in policy development, implementation or execution.
     
  15. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    I don't know about that. Smart money is on Castro having effectively eliminated much of the bounce that Obama sought in the way of legacy. Especially after this administration's disastrous and far-reaching international blunders. Such as snoozing while ISIS ascended, and having laid groundwork leading to the migrant exodus.
     
  16. Eraserhead, Mar 29, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016

    Eraserhead macrumors G4

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    #16
    How exactly would you have handled Syria to avoid a migrant exodus?

    And how would you have handled Iraq and Syria to avoid the rise of Daesh? Bearing in mind the state of Iraq at the end of Bushes presidency.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    I think it possible that their excessive and intense dislike of President Obama - and their taste for occasionally hysterical hyperbole - leads some posters here to see nothing but ill in everything he has done, and to a fundamental misreading of much of what is happening internationally.

    He inherited two wars he had not started, and felt the need to try to end US involvement in both of them.

    Agreed.

    The US needs to learn the lesson that engineering the successful overthrow of a dictator or autocratic regime does not, inevitably, lead to the automatic development or evolution of democracy in the absence of sufficient and necessary conditions
     
  18. FieldingMellish, Mar 29, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016

    FieldingMellish Suspended

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    I just mentioned a couple facts. The rest of your assumptions and assertions are yours alone. As is the excuse you've given as cover for our President's international blunders going forward all that's preceded him, for no President has been given a clean slate to work with. In Obama's case, his "attempt" to "try and end US involvement" has done America or the world little benefit; more to the point, it's introduced the unique outcomes I've mentioned that are of the President's own creation.

    It's apparent that Obama's lockjaw preventing the words "Islamic Terrorist" affects others when it comes to the words "Obama, through inaction, helped foster growth of a now internationally-reaching terrorist organization, while also helping create the scene from which tens of thousands of Muslims flee."
     
  19. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

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  20. Renzatic Suspended

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    So I take it you're all about taking a hard stance against a communist nation, and prefer we uphold the old blockades, right?
     
  21. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

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    How about a little give and take, we lighten up on sanctions after they give us Assata Shakur. We can play it by ear after that.
     
  22. Renzatic Suspended

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    I have no idea who Assata Shakur is, but...eh, fair enough, I guess.

    Though I was going to say that, historically speaking, taking a hardline stance against communism hasn't done a thing to quell it. To me, it seems that television, music, and nice clothes has been more of a drag on communist countries than any military action.

    Well, a couple of military blunders, and one of the greatest nuclear disasters ever kinda helped things along.
     
  23. lowendlinux Contributor

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    #23
    We could use a little more of the blatant SS biting commentary, bravo!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assata_Shakur

    I didn't either but the jist is she was a black power type in the '70's was involved in a shootout in Jersey ran to Cuba and was given and was granted political asylum.

    she doesn't seem to be the type of person to get cross with
     

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