D3S question when shooting in burst mode and color different from 1 shot to the next?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by trjwv, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. trjwv macrumors regular

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    Feb 24, 2010
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    kentucky...Go Cats
    #1
    When shooting (D3S Nikon) on continuous burst mode, I am seeing a color (temp) difference from shot 1 to shot 2. I am not changing any settings nor is the WB bracketing turned on. The difference I see is, shot 1 is very warm and shot 2 is very cool. My setting is on 9 fps. I was shooting in a gymnasium under harsh lighting but the color should not be different. I have heard that flickering lights can cause this but I have noticed this also happening in my home under constant lighting conditions. Any suggestions???
    Thanks
     
  2. cosmokanga2 macrumors 6502a

    cosmokanga2

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    #2
    Weird given that WB bracketing is off. Did the problem still occur if you switched to a WB preset or manuel WB?
     
  3. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

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    Jun 9, 2009
    #3
    That's what I was thinking. If your WB was set to auto, it could be changing slightly with each shot. If you set it to a particular value then

    If you have been shooting in RAW, it is pretty easy to batch-assign a standard WB to all your imported images from those burst(s), thus the images you took should be easily salvageable. As they are RAW you can change the WB with essentially no penalty after-the-fact.

    Ruahrc
     
  4. trjwv thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    Yes, I definitely shoot in raw so I can and will correct in post processing. I was just wondering to correct on my next shoot. I will try and shoot next time with WB set, I currently have it set to auto. Thanks all...
     
  5. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

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    SF Bay Area
    #5
    Interior lighting can be very tricky for white balance. You ought to consider investing in a white balance card. You would include it in a reference shot, then use that shot to accurately adjust white balance in post for the rest of the shoot.
     
  6. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

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    #6
    Second that... I made a habbit of putting a standard light grey cardboard sheet in the first shot in new lighting.. while not a perfect grey card, it allows me to come damn close to the real thing when adjusting white balance.
     
  7. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

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    #7
    I sprung for a whibal pocket card a couple of years ago. It's got the correct tonality, it seems to be indestructible, and the price is reasonable.
     
  8. admwright macrumors regular

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    #8
    Just wondering why you would not use the white balance card to set a custom white balance and then there would be no need to adjust from a reference shot?
     
  9. Cliff3, Jan 27, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011

    Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

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    #9
    I am a little unclear on the scope of your question, so I'll answer it broadly and that way probably hit on what your specific question was.

    Color temperature (white balance) is an attribute of the light falling on the scene being photographed. If the light changes, then the color temperature changes. If a sunny day becomes overcast, or morning becomes afternoon, or someone turns on a lamp, the color temperature of the light changes. It is not a value that can be preserved as an eternal constant within the camera.

    Automatic white balance settings attempt to arrive at an estimation of the color temperature. They usually do a decent enough job, but certain situations, particularly indoor scenes that may contain a mixture of different light sources, confound them. A white balance card is a card that is 18% gray. By using it as a reference in the scene, it provides an exact control which you can use within your editor to specify the white balance.

    In theory I could use the card to directly measure the white balance and create a preset value that way. I shoot with a Nikon D700 and it support this. Your camera's feature set may be different. Assuming your camera supports this capability, you can read about that process in your camera manual.

    I find it's easier to just set the card down and grab a quick photo of it. Then after I ingest I use the WB selector tool in Lightroom to specify the gray card as a reference point and use it to derive the WB for the scene. I copy that value across the remainder of the photos in the shoot and I'm good to go.

    On a semi-related note, I do usually use a custom preset white balance setting. It's called UniWB. It causes the RGB histograms to more closely reflect the light actually being captured by the camera. The resulting photos have a strong greenish cast that is corrected when I adjust WB in post.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. djbahdow01 macrumors 6502a

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    Northeast, CT
    #10
    You may think your home lighting is consistent but in reality it is not.

    AC - Alternating Current which is how your home/gym is wired, the current alternates at a 60hz frequency. In the time frame you take a shot (less than 1/60th sec) so say 1/250th you will see a difference in color temperatures as the lights cycle.

    Try shooting at 1/60th or 1/30th sec and you will see consistent color. Otherwise you will be seeing a color shift throughout a consecutive burst.

    With the fluorescent lighting coming into play nowadays you will see this less and less, but if the gym is using sodium vapor or mercury lighting then you will see a shift, same with home with regular light bulbs that are not the new energy efficient fluorescents.
     
  11. Rowbear macrumors 6502a

    Rowbear

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    #11
    +1 . This is exactly what is happening. It happened to me at a Hockey rink a few years ago.

    At major NHL games, official photographers have Pocket Wizzards linked to powerfull lighting way up in the ceiling, providing bursts of light the moment the shutter is triggered to alliviate this effect.
     
  12. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

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    Jun 9, 2009
    #12
    I'm curious, did you measure the UniWB of your sensor yourself or did you get it from some source online? I shoot a D80 and use UniWB, and I could never figure out exactly how to measure the UniWB of my sensor, so I found someone's profile online. But I wonder if my results would be better/noticeably different if I measured the UniWB of my camera? Kind of how like every LCD monitor is slightly different thus the need for colorimeters.

    Ruahrc
     
  13. Cliff3 macrumors 65816

    Cliff3

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    SF Bay Area
    #13
    I don't recall exactly where I found the file for my camera, but IIRC it was made available online by the person that publishes Raw Photo Processor software. The file is camera model specific, but I don't think sample variation plays much of a role.

    Monitors are strongly affected by ambient light. My home office gets a fair bit of reflected light from the yellow exterior walls of my building so the colorimeter needs to adjust for that. The sensor lives in a far more controlled place.
     
  14. Flash SWT macrumors 6502

    Flash SWT

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    Mar 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #14
    It is the lights in the gym cycling and there isn't really anything you can do about it. For a technical discussion see this thread at SportsShooter:
    http://www.sportsshooter.com/message_display.html?tid=20873

    .
     

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