Dad teaches his son a lesson for being a bully

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #1

    well done, controlled environment & he was not seriously hurt.
     
  2. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #2
    Is there a more detailed backstory to this?

    In general though, good for him for being an involved parent. I'm not a dad yet, but I will be one day and I can imagine how pissed off I would feel if I found out my kid was bullying someone. I hate bullies and that would be a huge no no in my book. Unforunately, too many parents let it go.
     
  3. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #3
    Sadly no, not much of a back story that I can find.
     
  4. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #4
    We're going to teach you not to be violent by...beating you.
     
  5. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #5
    Whatever works
     
  6. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #6
    I take it as a poetic lesson, showing what it feels like to be on the receiving end of what he probably gave to some other poor kid. Enforced empathy, if you will.
     
  7. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #7
    I absolute loathe bullies, and think the dad handled the matter appropriately. Now the bully knows about intimidation and powerlessness in the face of agression.

    Good on dad.

    I have children and will not tolerate a bully under my roof. There will be consequences.
     
  8. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #8
    I'm not big on the use of violence to teach anything, and I'm not sure whether it inspires any understanding of why it's a **** thing to bully other kids. At the very least he learned that there's always someone stronger.
     
  9. \-V-/ Suspended

    \-V-/

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    #9
    From what I've learned in my years of being bullied in school is that bullies just need an ass-whopping sometimes. I eventually started learning to defend myself ... and fighting back ... hard. Not only did this stop my bullies from beating my ass every day ... it seemed to keep them from bullying other people. This doesn't work with everyone, but for some of them it can let them see what it feels like to be on the other side of pain and hurting others. I'm not a big fan of violence to teach violence, but sometimes it's the only way.
     
  10. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #10
    As the death sentence shows in a vast majority of places, a. Two wrongs don't make a right, b. It doesn't work as a deterrent.

    This kid will carry on bullying.... violence breeds violence.
     
  11. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #11
    What do you suggest? Because the coddling of our youths is clearly working. I'm guessing you aren't a parent.
     
  12. \-V-/ Suspended

    \-V-/

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    #12
    Things aren't as black and white as you think they are.
     
  13. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #13
    I am a father, and I study learning as my profession. Violent punishment does not cause a kid to associate their bad behaviour with the punishment. Typically the gap in time between the two is too long for an association to form. Instead a kid will associate the punishment with the punisher, who is the immediate cause of their discomfort. So, if you want your kids to fear you, feel free to pull stunts like this. Punishment can work to reduce the likelihood ongoing bad behaviour, but it is rare the parents catch kids in the act of bullying. Moreover, the person delivering the punishment acts as a discriminative stimulus - the kid learns that the presence of the punisher determines whether or not the punishment occurs, so they wait for the parent to be absent before kicking off their bad behaviour.

    As for this video, I can't see how giving the bully a concussion helps matters much. Perhaps it might take his chutzpah down a notch or two, but it is a fine line between being humble and being anxious.
     
  14. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #14

    parents DON'T need to catch their kids in the act, doubt this man caught he son, more than likely he learned about it from someone else. your kids/your problem, his kids are his problem.
     
  15. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #15
    Right, so a century of psychological research demonstrating that animals, kids, and adults have a hard time associating behaviours with consequences separated by a long gap in time means nothing.

    Punishment makes the kid associate their parent with pain/discomfort. Namely, it causes the kid to fear the parent, not just when the kid is getting up to no good, but all the time. Like I said, if that appeals, then by all means use corporal punishment. Just don't expect it to have a selective effect of reducing bad behaviour.
     
  16. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #16
    1.because ALL animals/kids/adults are the SAME?
    2. perhaps he will video the weekly lessons he is going to give HIS son.
    3. I love mine, even after I earned the belt/wooden spoon/hot wheels track (the swoosh sound it made sucked) and a host of other things :D.
    4. wrong, see 3.
     
  17. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #17
    As bad an idea as it is to judge other people's parenting (because children are individuals and what works for me and my kids might not work for them and theirs), this sounds like an asinine and ineffective way to convince someone that bullying is wrong. How about making him have to atone to and get to know the person he bullied? Trying to get him to understand that all people are beings worthy of respect seems like a better goal than teaching him that the only way to avoid being bullied is by being on top of the bully pecking order.
     
  18. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #18
    If you loved your parents, then probably you learned how to behave by modelling their behaviour, talking with them, and adopting their values. It probably had precious little to do with wooden spoons.

    When I remember my childhood, I remember getting paddled (as in, with a ping-pong paddle) by a certain teacher. Funnily enough, I do not remember my bad behaviour that triggered these punishments. On the other hand, I do remember my grandpa's withering looks when I got caught engaging in a certain amount of hooliganism one Halloween (it seemed like a good idea at the time). Respect for a given adult and their values trumps fear of them in my experience.
     
  19. \-V-/ Suspended

    \-V-/

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    #19
    That's a very limited scope to apply to such a wide array of human experiences...
     
  20. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #20
    This would be the ideal solution. Neverteheless, it rarely works in life. Been there done that.
    As a kid I took up martial arts to defend myself. It worked.
    That was the reason why both my sons have followed that path since the age of 5. They have never had problems. At least solved them very quickly and effectively.
     
  21. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #21
    I'm not saying kids shouldn't learn to defend themselves. That might be a positive, confidence building experience for the kid who was bullied--and many or most other kids as well. But for the kid doing the bullying, learning martial arts seems unlikely to convince him to stop bullying.
     
  22. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #22
    the kid in the video respected his dad enough to get in the ring & have a go at it.
    this is a parent that is involved with his kid.
    most who learn Martial arts also learn to RESPECT others. hell a good teacher will always tell you the first rule is to avoid confrontations at all cost. the best defense is NOT engaging someone at all.
     
  23. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #23
    lol kumbaya my Lord, kumbaya
     
  24. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #24
    You must've misunderstood or I was not clear enough. I referred to victims or potential victims learning martial arts and handling the problems in the same environment and on the same level.
     
  25. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #25
    Pretty lucky Crispy Visuals were there to capture the whole thing! Thank goodness for the Youtube title as well so the story can be verified!
     

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