DC Council officially repeals minimum-wage hike for tipped workers

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by RootBeerMan, Oct 16, 2018.

  1. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    #1
    At last! There are some politicians who get it. They listened to the do-gooders initially and put it on a ballot to let people who knew nothing about the issue vote on it. Like good little voters do, they passed the measure to increase the minimum wage for tipped workers in DC, (despite the fact that those very workers did not want it, the restaurants didn't want and the restaurant associations didn't want it). Why didn't they want it? Because it would cost the workers money and jobs and the restaurants didn't want it because because it would cost them inordinate amounts of money and they'd likely lose employees to places in VA and MD. At last, though, the City council came to their senses and repealed it. Now the waiters and waitresses can rest easy. The do-gooders have been defeated, for now and their income is safe.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/news/4...-repeals-minimum-wage-hike-for-tipped-workers

     
  2. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #2
    Too many people do not understand that people receiving tipped minimum wage are still required to be paid full minimum wage. If the tips received do not add up to the minimum wage, then the employer has to make up the difference. Honestly, if a tipped wage person is not making enough in tips they need to rethink the service they are providing.
     
  3. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    #3
    That’s cute. Employers steal $8+ billion from workers each year. Being “required” to pay the difference doesn’t mean a thing when it’s not actively enforced by anyone.

    https://www.epi.org/publication/emp...ficant-cost-to-taxpayers-and-state-economies/
     
  4. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #4
    Employees have recourse if they feel the law has been violated. Every workplace is required to post signage in employee areas explaining the law. The posters not only state that the employer must make up the amount to reach full minimum wage but gives a phone number at the bottom to report it or ask questions.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    #5
    Again. $8+ Billion are stolen for workers each year. The federal government acknowledges this, yet neither party actually puts effort into correcting the largest source of crime in the country each year. This represents more theft than all burglaries, car jackings, and robberies combined.

    This is systemic, no phone number reporting is going to change that.

    Tipped wages are an archaic system that has no place in this country, it doesn't exist in most around the world.
     
  6. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #6
    So what? That means that those workers do not bother to report it and continue working there. The law is clear, employers are required to make up the difference if a tipped wage employee doesn't make full minimum wage. Then of course, there is the fact that if a tipped wage employee isn't making more than minimum wage, they aren't very good at their job and should find another line of work.

    Did you miss the part in the OP that the waiters and waitresses didn't want this new law, either?

     
  7. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Location:
    Communard de Londres,Tiocfaidh ár lá
    #7
    Yes it sounds a good system why isn't it expanded to say politicians, aircraft pilots and surgeons so they can prostitute themselves to get a reasonable income.
     
  8. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #8
    All of the professions that you mention are not tipped waged jobs. Waiters/Waitresses, for example receive tips from customers as part of their compensation. The law says if the compensation does not meet minimum wage the employer has to make up the difference.
     
  9. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Location:
    Communard de Londres,Tiocfaidh ár lá
    #9
    Yes we know the law says that but we also know it doesn't happen.
    In case you didn't understand I was asking why of all the professions Wait staff (and a hand full of others) in the U.S. have to perform a grisly circus act in order to receive a reasonable wage.Or do you believe all those "have a nice day" platitudes are said with sincerity and warmth.
     
  10. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    #10
    As I'm sure you'd point out in a thread on the border, laws have no meaning without enforcement.
     
  11. Tinmania macrumors 68040

    Tinmania

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Location:
    Aridzona
    #11
    But this costs American taxpayers. Personally, I'm tired of the whole tipping thing. What's next, UPS and postal carriers carrying around tip jars on their belts? And the tips just keep growing. Twenty years ago it seemed a typical tip for a meal was 15%, not counting tax. Now it is 20% and up, with of course higher meal prices--and the norm seems to be tipping on the tax too (tipping someone to collect tax--wow). All this for a chance to have my credit card number stolen, yay! (Happened to both me and my wife in the last year. Thankfully that risk is diminishing with pay-at-the-table.)

    The out-of-control tipping phenomenon in the US has other downsides. Tipped wages promotes a spend mentality, since every day is payday. I know several people who have college degrees yet remained servers since the income was higher than they could get with their degree. My 26 yo niece is now three years out of college, yet still working as a server in Los Angeles. She often makes $1,500-$2,000 for the weekend alone. Since it is California, she also still earns $10.50 per hour in wages. So it is hard to convince her that it is "wise" to take a 50% pay cut in order to better her career, down the road. But ten years from now she won't be this beautiful bubbly 26 yo--she will be 36 and then what.

    I'd rather the server make enough from wages, with a tip being optional. This seems to work for fast-casual restaurants, such as Chipotle, Culver's, Panera, et al. Maybe that is why that segment is growing.

    Sorry for the rant!



    Mike
     
  12. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #12
    I’d be glad to see tipping eliminated. I don t think waiters would.
     
  13. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    #13
    I'd imagine a waitress in the middle of nowhere Oklahoma would be glad to get a consistent and livable wage.

    The people who make good money on tips tend to be working where major population centers and gentrification are happening. Is there a reason why you only care about the coastal elite waiters and waitresses? ;)

    I'm intentionally flipping the script if you couldn't tell.
     
  14. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #14
    My former stepdaughter made better than $200 a night working at Waffle House on the weekends when she was in college. That wasn’t near a metro area.
     
  15. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    #15
    Congrats to her. I’ve walked into plenty of restaurants in NH, TN, LA, and NY where I was clearly the first person there in hours. If the owner isn’t following the law (which $8 billion worth of them a year clearly aren’t) where does that leave the workers? These are some of the poorest areas in the country so please don’t respond with a flippant “find a new job or move.”
     
  16. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Shady Dale, Georgia
    #16
    If a person is unhappy with the wages or treatment from the employer, he/she can quit. If he/she feels a law has been broken, they should call the number to report it.
     
  17. aristobrat macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #17
    What is your expectation for how this should work? If you’re the first person in a restaurant for several hours, and your thought is that wait staff should be paid a higher hourly wage vs minimum and tips, ... I’m guessing that restaurant is going to change their hours to not be open when there are no customers, which means no chance at all for that employee to earn money during those hours anymore, or it’s going to close. No business is going to pay an employee more than they make now to do nothing because there’s no customers to serve.
     
  18. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    #18
    Happens quite often in the restaurant industry. More times than opponents of tipped wages would like to admit. Costs the restaurant a pretty penny, too, as they not only have to pay those wages out in one lump sum, they are also usually fined by the government. More than one restaurant has been put out of business for the practice.

    My first real job while in high school was in northern VA at a surf and turf dinner restaurant. Not a fast food joint by any means and the prices reflected it. Back of house was paid well, for the time. Front of house waiters and waitresses made really good money. I am reminded of two whom I knew that were a boyfriend/girlfriend pair. They both attended college during the day, studying for their MBA's. They made very good money. Some years later I went back to the place when I was between overseas gigs and worked the bar. The two waiters were still there. They had got their MBA's, but preferred to keep waiting because they liked the schedule and they made plenty of money, well beyond what do-gooders want as a "living wage". This was not out of the norm for restaurant workers in the region. And that's still the case today. Glad the DC council came to their senses.
     

Share This Page

17 October 16, 2018