Death by Liberalism

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by HyperX13, Jan 18, 2011.

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  1. HyperX13 macrumors 6502

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    Death by LiberalismBy J.R. Dunn
    Many AT readers are aware that I have been working on a book project for the past several years. I have mentioned it occasionally on this site, more often in the past few weeks as publication drew nearer. Now zero hour has arrived: Death by Liberalism. The Fatal Outcome of Well-Meaning Liberal Policies is available as of today. It's the first publication from Broadside Books, renowned editor Adam Bellow's new conservative imprint.


    Simply put, DbL deals with the appalling and overlooked fact that liberalism kills. This is no metaphor, no exaggeration, and no mistake. Liberal policies put in place by liberal politicians to achieve liberal goals kill thousands of Americans each year. In the past half-century, liberalism may have killed up to 500,000 American citizens (and this is not even counting DDT or ethanol, which are responsible for a death rate orders of magnitude larger in the international sphere). We have known for years that liberalism is corrupt, wasteful, and futile. Now we know that it is even worse. Liberalism is lethal.


    How does this work? Is it some sort of grand Sorosian conspiracy to assure limitless political power? An environmentalist Green scheme to cut the population on behalf of Mother Gaia? Not at all. The soft lethality of liberalism is a result of that saddest of English phrases: "unintended consequences." Liberal politicians, academics, and operatives want to do good. They want to benefit Americans and the country as a whole. They want to do it their way, through large-scale governmental policy. They know exactly how it is to be done, and they will brook no interference. So they set out on their grand schemes, and it ends, always and without exception, in disaster. Some of those disasters go over the line into something resembling mass negligent homicide: the legal procedural revolution, the DDT ban, CAFE fuel standards, federalized child protection, deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill, and gun-free zones, to mention only a few.


    Let's take federal child protection as an example. Shortly before becoming vice president under Jimmy Carter, Senator Walter Mondale sponsored a bill aimed at the reform of child protection services. Established to assist and rescue children from abusive and neglectful adults, these services had been operating for a century with good results, many of them privately run and associated with churches and other charities. Mondale wished to transform them all into state agencies, funded by government, staffed by trained professionals, with operating standards set by federal bureaucrats.


    The result was exactly what any student of Hayek, Parkinson, or Sowell could have predicted. The government-run agencies became typical bureaucracies, marked by incompetence, callousness, and endless paperwork. Across the country, children under the care of such agencies began dying. For thirty years and more, scarcely a week has gone by without yet another newspaper report of a child murdered while under the "protection" of one of these agencies. The numbers may well mount into the thousands. We can't be sure, since the bureaucrats in charge often hide behind privacy laws to stifle investigations and outside oversight. (This doesn't always work -- in Philadelphia last year, no fewer than nine social service social workers were found guilty of complicity in the starvation death of Danieal Kelly).


    Did Walter Mondale intend any such thing? Not at all -- he meant well. He went for the customary big-government solution; he was intent on fixing something that wasn't broken. The result was suffering on a massive scale. To his credit, Mondale is on record as regarding the bill as an action he regrets. Most liberal politicians responsible for similar policies would admit to no such thing.


    They would remain silent because liberals do not look upon their ideology as a political doctrine to be judged by the same standards as all others. No -- liberalism is viewed as a religion -- a religion of the purely millennial type, promising its believers a new, pure, utterly transformed world. Its leaders are the saints and heroes -- Oldsmobile Teddy Kennedy, Grand Kleagle Robert Byrd, and Charlie "what taxes?" Rangel -- who will lead us into this new world. But with DbL, this illusion has come to an end. No longer can liberals shield themselves from their actions. No longer can they present themselves as messianic figures magically and unerringly healing a fallen world.


    They are not happy about this. The first reviews of DbL have been marked by a sense of shock coupled with outrage. The common response is that the book is "illogical"--- it's like being criticized by an army of Mr. Spocks. None have actually critiqued that logic -- which consists of simple empiricism, the contention that effects must have a cause -- in any detail. Several reviewers have outright lied about the book, one claiming that I'm referring to people "dying of heart attacks from working too hard to pay taxes." Another states that I claim that liberals will soon be hunting us down "with their guns." (What kind of liberals does she know, I wonder?) And this is only the beginning. I'm scheduled to appear on Lawrence O'Donnell's "Last Word" this Thursday, and I doubt that he intends to congratulate me on the excellence of my research.


    Such a reaction is understandable. All that liberalism has left is its patina of virtue -- the claim that liberals are always right, that they know all the answers, that they alone embody the good in the political sphere. This is fading fast, as liberalism becomes the ideology that abuses Down infants, that supports and excuses terrorists, that attempts to exploit mass murders. I hope that DbL represents yet another step in this process.


    I've been writing for AT for a little over five years now. In that time, I've gotten much in the way of encouragement and useful criticism. It was an AT reader who inspired DbL in the first place, with a question as to whether "there was anything like a black book of liberalism." I know I've come a long way as a writer, a thinker, and a conservative in that time. I'm sure we all have. We have a long road ahead, and we are now moving into a new phase, a new level of activity and influence. I hope you are all looking forward to it as much as I am.

    J.R. Dunn is consulting editor of American Thinker and will edit the forthcoming Military Thinker.
     
  2. Queso macrumors G4

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    tl;dr

    Seriously, yawnfest cut and pasting that adds nothing to the forum.
     
  3. Rt&Dzine macrumors 6502a

    Rt&Dzine

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    #3
    All you've done is copy someone's opinion piece. If you're going to start a thread you're supposed to add commentary of some sort.
     
  4. Kauai macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    If you read some of his other stuff you'd see why he needs to cut and paste other people's arguments.
     
  5. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #5
    Umm..what? One department that isn't working like it should and all of a sudden liberalism is murderous? They really will stop at nothing, and will stoop to any level. Pathetic. And I love how he even admits he has no numbers to back his claims.
     
  6. Queso macrumors G4

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    I love the idea of a magazine named American Thinker though. If only it had a much larger circulation :D
     
  7. likemyorbs macrumors 68000

    likemyorbs

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    #7
    Riiight, because churches don't abuse children.
     
  8. Rt&Dzine macrumors 6502a

    Rt&Dzine

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    #8
    SourceWatch describes American Thinker as part of the right wing's echo chamber.
     
  9. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #9
    First of all, this is just someone's opinion piece from a blog. If it were the blog of anyone with credibility, such as Paul Krugman, it might mean something.

    Second, this guy's book is being put out by a no-name conservative publisher. Whoopee.

    Third, the guy offers no proofs for his claims, other than the case of Danieal Kelly, a case for which he can't even agree with the article he links to as to how many social workers are going to trial, or whether they've been convicted yet or not. 3(a): In what world can we make the assumption that this sort of cheating/falsification of records never occurs in charities and private industry?

    This thread is a waste of good pixels.
     
  10. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #10
    Uh, wasn't that Reagan that basically tossed all the mentally ill into the streets (which really helped with the homeless problem in this country :rolleyes:) ?
     
  11. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Sure was- he did away with federal funding for state institutions which effectively shut them down. Many of the inmates were given a bus ticket to wherever they wanted to go, and that was that. I remember when it first started, severely mentally ill people were suddenly showing up in my tiny college town on the street. It was unbelievable.
     
  12. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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  13. Arran macrumors 68040

    Arran

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    #13
    Death by verbiage

    Same here.
     
  14. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

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    #14
    My understanding in talking to observant types much older than myself is that before this there were far fewer homeless living on the streets. Unforgivable.

    As for the article: rambling, misinformed, poorly written, fear mongering disinformational tripe.
     
  15. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #15
    And you would be right. Reagan did a lot of unforgivable things, this just being one of them. He also ignored the AIDS crisis, and tripled our national debt.
     
  16. Queso macrumors G4

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    #16
    I get that. The whole thing sounds very much like the definition of an oxymoron :D

    No offence :p
     
  17. leekohler, Jan 18, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2011

    leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #17
  18. redshift1 macrumors regular

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    Like Regnery Publishing, Broadside Books apparently will focus on pseudo-scholarly content skipping peer review and targeting a specific group. Granted I have not seen their full catalogue but I'm skeptical of anything except more Malkinesque style writing.
     
  19. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    I'm sorry. I couldn't read past this point.

    I think this sums it up the OP quite well.
     
  20. freeny macrumors 68020

    freeny

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    #20
    "And the band played on" would be another good read.
     
  21. Rt&Dzine macrumors 6502a

    Rt&Dzine

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    #21
    I know. I wasn't directing my comment to you specifically, even though I quoted you. :eek:
     
  22. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #22
    Since this thread is lacking any discussion regarding the copy/pasted topic, we'll shut 'er down. Feel free to let us know via the usual contact methods if you feel otherwise.
     
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