Death, your views.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Aug 21, 2016.

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Midget

  1. go to StoVoKor

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  2. what the hell is StoVoKor

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  3. are you seriously a Trekkie geek?

    9 vote(s)
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  4. you know Mexican's don't work in the future either, right?

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  1. jkcerda Suspended

    jkcerda

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    #1
    mom passed away at the beginning of this year. she was Catholic. I have long ago forgotten my Catholic upbringing for many reasons, today as an effort to remember mom I learned one of her recipes.
    sweet mole. [​IMG]

    pretty much spot on to what she used to make so yeah I cried.

    Anyways, I don't hold the beliefs I once did, so obviously there is part of me that wishes to believe in heaven and another one that does not buy into the fantasy of heaven. we all know hell does exist, at least those of us married :p .

    so with that in mind, what are your views on the after life if any? will we meet again once we shed our corporeal bodies? or will we simply cease to exist? is the light at the end of the tunnel just us being reborn & being pushed out of another vagina?
     
  2. Mac'nCheese macrumors 68030

    Mac'nCheese

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    #2
    Big surprise here: you die, you die. Nothing happens.
     
  3. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #3
    Given that our consciousness seems to be dependent on our brain (and influenced by things like trauma, drugs), I believe we simply cease to exist. Our physical body degrades to someday compose another organism. I admit it's a somewhat depressing outlook, but that doesn't mean our existence has to be pointless.

    Sorry to hear about your mom.
     
  4. Limey77 macrumors regular

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    #4
    Simply cease to exist then decompose so that we all can finally do something good and worthwhile for our planet. Even those that deny climate change.
     
  5. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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    #5
    but dead people can spread disease and come back to haunt us.
    299747.jpg
     
  6. mudslag macrumors regular

    mudslag

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    #6

    f***ing zombies
     
  7. Limey77 macrumors regular

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    #7
    The dead spread a LOT less disease than the living - plus they're usually much better listeners than anyone here
     
  8. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #8
    It's great to remember your mom by getting her mole recipe (now we have to get it from you)... Every time I make something my grandma taught me, I remember how patient she was with me always trying to mess about in her kitchen when to me it was play, but to her a challenge since she actually meant also to put a meal on the table before dark!

    On the hereafter, or not: who knows. Close eyes, feel connection to people gone before. It's as real as we make it, I guess. I'm more fond of the rituals than the dogma of my childhood faith and I know that, but it does not deter me from observing some of them anyway, even if I am a cafeteria-style religionist. Before the merciful God I half-believe in, why would I not make my imperfect offerings?

    I love so many works of music that involve a setting of the Mass. I will never give up that music even if, like Schubert, I have more than occasional doubts about "one holy, catholic and apostolic church..."

    So I cling to the music. And my grandma's recipes. Never give up good food that your kin once set in front of you...
     
  9. D.T. macrumors 603

    D.T.

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    #9
    Dang dude, you write this quite a bit, I mean, I know you're joking, but you're kind of _not_ joking ... [?]

    I gotta tell ya, and the other married folks, people thinking about getting married, people who don't consider it an option, I f***ing LOVE being married. My wife and I have a blast, we hang out together, work together, don't have separate friends - seriously it is AWESOME.

    In fact, I was reading this post to her, and she did a little dance ... I won't get into details ... but yeah :D
     
  10. jkcerda thread starter Suspended

    jkcerda

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    #10
    Been in hell,,,,,,,i mean married for the last 22 years and she seems hell bent on sticking around to torture me until I die :eek:. Got lucky I guess :D
     
  11. SusanK macrumors 68000

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    #11
    jkcerda, sorry about your mom. Preparing the special dish was nice. I'm not a believer in afterlife. Many are and it's a source of comfort. At times I wish I believed.
     
  12. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #12
    That Mole looks delicious.....care to share the recipe? Please?

    As for the in-depth question you asked......it's not something which can easily be answered, although, yes, people who are firm believers in some particular religion will find comfort in whatever the rites of passage and the rituals and the beliefs of that particular group are.....

    Regardless of all that, to me the important thing is to cherish the memories of the loved one, the person who has passed into another realm, to honor them and keep them within one's heart always as a part of oneself. Making your mother's Mole recipe is indeed a way of honoring her and thinking about her, loving her and keeping her close to you. No formal religious ceremonies needed, just your own genuine love and caring towards her during her lifetime and beyond her lifetime......
     
  13. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #13
    I'll admit that I find death pretty damn frightening. My inevitable non-existence and utter extinction isn't something I particularly look forward to. Nabakov said "Life is a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness." Well, I think that sucks. However, I do take comfort in the fact that nearly every atom in my body is tens billions of years old. Really, I'm only borrowing them. They will be returned whence they came so something or someone else can use them. And I'll never know it anyway.
     
  14. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #14
    Wait, isn't it six thousand years? :p
     
  15. dec., Aug 21, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016

    dec. Suspended

    dec.

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    #15
    I assume that the nothingness after life is the same as it was before life and therefore completely neutral as in "non-perceivable" [you're dead after all]. I hate the fact that I will die, I try to find comfort by knowing that it will happen to all of us, but it doesn't really help me as an individual. The thing I'm really am afraid of is the journey towards that, knowing that my time will be (or is) running out and the fact that I'll never see the turns and twists that technology, humanity will take (before being completely eradicated by some meteor/climate disaster/other crap).

    [Sorry for your loss, jk, it takes a lot of time to even get used to the fact that mom just is not there anymore. Mine passed away during my immigration process in 2006, it was an awful mess and I barely made it to her funeral in Germany, I'm glad that I went, potentially risking my Canadian permant residency at that point ("don't leave the country, or they will not let you back in"), we were very close even if separated by distance.]
     
  16. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

    DrewDaHilp1

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    #16
    Sorry for your loss. I don't know what happens after we go and that thought terrifies me.

    On a happier note that looks good, you gonna share the recipe?
     
  17. Khalanad75 macrumors 6502

    Khalanad75

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    #17
    Sorry for the loss. I luckily still have both my parents around as of now, but know that losing a parent is hard for most folks.

    As for what's next....

    I'm a firm believer in Fate and reincarnation. We are fated to go when we go, and nothing you can really do will change that. But I also believe our lives are like threads to a great tapestry, and when it gets snipped at one point, it will get re-woven in at another point. All of your closest friends and loved ones are thread of other lives that continually get re-threaded around yours. So you may lose them in this life, but you will come across them in the next. You now those people you meet and instantly feel like you are brethren or you have known them for years and not just minutes... it's because you have known them for a lot longer than that, just in past lives.


    I know I'm a bit unique in my views, but it's honestly what I have felt in my heart about life for as long as I can remember. I have never cried at a funeral (and I have lost some very close friends and family,) I just remember the great times spent in this life and say, "till we meet again."
     
  18. jkcerda thread starter Suspended

    jkcerda

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    #18
    as soon as I translate the ingredients to English.
     
  19. lowendlinux, Aug 22, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2016

    lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #19
    I think our afterlife resides in the memory of the people that knew us and the stories that will be passed down. I don't think a day goes by that I don't remember my grandparents or my MIL and all of them influence my actions in some way.
     
  20. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #20
    @jkcerda you get the the MRs Mundane Poll Award. :p

    See my Competent Theist Thread. ;)

    A simple and inadequate answer: We don't know and can only guess and comfort ourselves that everything will be ok. Btw, it will be ok no matter what. That's the aspect of life every living organism faces. :)

    Assurances based on our scientific knowledge are simplistic, imo a poor guess based on the limits of our knowledge. Some of us may have confidence in knowing .0000000000000000000000000000000001% of the total sum of knowledge and making determinations on that basis, but I'll call that unwise. :D

    Says you. :)

    Key phrase: seems to be dependent. ;)

    An opinion. :)
     
  21. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #21
    They're not mundane they're fun especially in a section that's gone over the top in everything political
     
  22. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #22
    Exactly my thoughts. Though they've been gone for many years, I think about my grandparents nearly every day. It's often crossed my mind that they are living on in memory.
     
  23. VulchR, Aug 22, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016

    VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #23
    I've nearly bit the dust twice. The first time was due to hypothermia after falling into a frozen lake. On my way to shelter I sat down by a tree and had an amazing experience - it wasn't that I was viewing an amazingly beautiful tranquil scene (rustling trees, birds, etc), but that I was the scene, with no barriers between what was happening 'out there' and what I was experiencing 'in here'. I realised I was going to die if I sat there, and it took every bit of my determination to leave the beautiful experience and get to shelter.

    The second time was due to oxygen deprivation. That was a panicked, painful, terrifying experience that I would not wish on my worst enemy. It was compounded by being able to see the medical gizmo's that documented the sudden decrease in the oxygen in the blood (spO2). I passed out not knowing whether I would wake up.

    These two experiences have shaped what I believe now. I intend to live as long as I usefully can, but I am not frightened of dying. I am frightened of what happens before I die. I am agnostic. I see no reason to believe in an afterlife, but then again there are limits to what we can know. The meager solace I had when I lost my parents were the good memories, but alas my mother's cooking wasn't among them:

    [​IMG]
     
  24. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #24
    Oh, ok if you say so. :p I tend to look at polls as a tool, not primarily as entertainment.
    --- Post Merged, Aug 22, 2016 ---
    Intriquing story! Was that you brain firing off a farewell scene or a connection to existence beyond the gray screen of this world?
     
  25. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #25
    Jkcerda sorry about your mom.
    As for the afterlife... I am Catholic so what I believe should be pretty evident.
     

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