Democrats: we like old white guys

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Rogifan, Apr 30, 2019.

  1. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #51
    In name. But it's merely a savings account you can use for cleared medical procedures. I think it has its use in some cases. When I worked in big G, it was offered but I don't believe I partook. Our health, dental and vision was amazing in those days and really cheap. Tax payer funded. :p
    --- Post Merged, May 2, 2019 ---

    Again, you're correct to a point. Cleaning teeth won't mitigate any disaster, believe it or not. Cleanings merely do what they're advertised as. Polishing teeth and thereby removing some if not all extrinsic surface stains and not those embedded into the tooth's structure. The other parts are right, but even healthy teeth can suffer health problems from within. I don't remember off hand how much a typical employee with us pays, but it's under $500 a year and is a drop compared to their salaries. We catered the plan to allow them to add a spouse and our child(ren) with each person costing extra, but at a slightly reduced rate. Our competitors offer something similar for their employees. It costs us a lot, but as you said, costs are determined by use. We find that we don't lose much in the long run by offering a slush fund. The plan, however, is paramount to keeping people happy and if it means their kids can get emergency work done without waiting, then so be it. Obviously it's way more feasible for us to offer this dental plan than a typical health plan, which we offer varying levels of.

    Not tooting my own horn here, but I'd like to think I'm a decent employer for doing this one thing that makes a lot of people happy. But, yeah, cleanings even if done every 2 years are fine. Most surface staining can be removed over time with an electric brush. Though anything more could be contributed to general poor oral health within or outside a person's control. Event the healthiest mouths may get root cleanings a few times in their life due to mineral buildup.
    --- Post Merged, May 2, 2019 ---
    It really depends on the provider carriers you sit down with. They may outwardly offer a half dozen but if you push they have various plans. The slush account is unique if not rare. I know of few companies that offer something like it, and usually to higher ups.
     
  2. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #52
    Well, that very well may be true. But cleaning teeth isn’t exactly rocket science. For general teeth cleanings and exams I’d hope any old dentist would do. Once you start getting into more technical procedures and cosmetic work, then it might be more significant.

    That said, when I was growing up my dentist had this amazing hygienist- very personable and compassionate... and this awful old lady hygienist that’s I always got stuck with. She was rude, mean, and her shaky hands would skip from scraping your teeth to cutting a nice deep gash into your gum and then trying to blame it on gingivitis (which was never confirmed by the dentist) when you politely asked her to be more gentile.

    I imagine these cheap Groupon deals are attempts to do the following
    - Get people to switch to that practice so you can charge then the normal rate in subsequent appointments
    - Get people in who haven’t had dental care in a while in for an exam so you sell them on all the dental work they need done and have them do it there
    - To try and sell then on other services like tooth whitening
    Etc
     
  3. Zenithal, May 2, 2019
    Last edited: May 2, 2019

    Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #53
    Your sister is a maxillofacial surgeon. That's a bit different than every day dentistry. She is far more trained and more of a surgeon than a dentist. The issue with her billing is that issues such as jaw tumors or TMJ floats around the definition of what's beneficial vs cosmetic. And that's a sad fact, because TMJ is no laughing matter.

    Again, it really depends. Going by what I see alone, visually, I'd say most of our employees get professional whitening done a couple times a year, some have had cosmetic which the separate fund carries though porcelain veneers are covered in our dental plans, etc. I'd say they're getting at least $1,000 in treatment a year.

    Yep.

    Coincidentally, we offer both types of plans. Both are fairly similar, but some of our employees don't live in areas with quality dentists who provide HMO or PPO care, whichever the case. But as I said, this isn't just for employees. It's four their spouse/SO, and children. It may not be useful to them, but their SO or their children might get good use out of it. And that's what matters.

    They can remove themselves or whomever from their plan whenever they want. They can enroll again and 30 days later they're good to go. I'd say we've got over 95% take rate.
    --- Post Merged, May 2, 2019 ---

    Yeah I know what you're saying. Attractive hygienist. We actually keep a list of preferred dentists we recommend people check out because they're highly skilled and have been written about. Off the top of my head and I'm pulling a rough figure from what I recall in our contract, it could be the difference of an employee paying $270 for an E.Max crown versus $3,200 or so out of pocket in LA. Or $400 per porcelain veneer instead of $1,200 each.


    The gingivitis angle is amusing. Actual gingivitis, even in its early stages, is very visible. Though if you skip a day or two of brushing your gums may bleed for one reason or another if you floss or brush too hard. The small amount, or large depending on your diet, of plaque can cause gum irritation.


    I generally prefer using Colgate Total and have been using it before the FDA approved its sale in the US via "smuggling" it from Canada. My second choice is probably Optic stuff in the red tube. Excellent for after a stinky meal like seafood or certain ethnic foods.

    Sensodyne now and again. Colgate and Crest offer their own line, but the Sensodyne formulation seems to deliver the active better. I generally like Total because the active sticks to the tooth surface within minutes of application.
     
  4. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #54
    Well, there’s HSA’s and FSA’s. HSA’s can only be spent on medical related things (doctors, drugs, medical equipment, glasses, etc). FSA’s include all of that plus the funds can be spent on childcare. Indeed, in some ways the FSA it is A LOT less flexible (ie it’s linked to your employer, not portable, if you leave your job if you’re not strategic or you contribute too much you may end up forfeiting money back to your employer, it has a lower contribution maximum than HSA, you can only adjust the contribution 1x per year, you can’t withdraw for non-medical reasons, etc etc etc).

    FSA’s are good if you have a lot of out of pocket medical (or childcare) expenses as employers usually pay into them and they shelter those funds from income tax. But you have to really know what you’re doing. If you don’t have a lot of out of pocket expenses I’d generally avoid them.

    Haha again, I’ve been talking about your average person. But I get it. When I was <26 and on my dads insurance, I don’t remember the dental but the vision was more of the company paying out whatever you wanted than an actual insurance plan.

    She’s a DMD + MD (dentist + doctor + oral surgery residency). There’s several ways you can become a OM surgeon, but she’s indeed a fully trained dentist. She’s not cleaning teeth obviously, but actually quite a bit of overlap between what oral surgeons and what some regular dentists do. Many dentists do extractions and some do some level of implants. They of course are not doing cleft pallets surgeries, removing bone tumors, etc. Usually the determining factor is if anesthesia is used. Also a surprising amount of crossover between OM surgery and plastic surgery. Some OM’s are doing Botox injections which I find very weird.

    Again, I’m talking about average peoples plans. Very very few plans cover whitening, let alone multiple times a year. Porcelain veneers generally cost $1000 per tooth minimum. They often do as many teeth are clearly visible in the smile (so easy 4-6 maybe 8). How bad are you’re colleagues teeth that you need a dedicated fund for this?

    No this wasn’t gingivitis, it was direct trauma from a dental instrument haha.

    The funny thing about tooth paste and toothbrushes is I’ve talked to a number of dentists about this. The consensus for the average person is as long as the toothpaste has fluoride it really doesn’t make a difference. As for toothbrushes, the preferred is electric over manual. But past that it doesn’t make a difference.

    My complaint about Crest toothpaste however is it’s very drying to the mouth for some reason I’ve never explored. Obviously a dry mouth is not healthy in the long run. Therefore I tend to avoid Crest.
     
  5. Zenithal, May 2, 2019
    Last edited: May 2, 2019

    Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #55
    It's about $1,200 per veneer here without insurance. Less than half with good insurance through an employer provided the plan they picked out or set up is good, this is before anything else.

    You're missing the point once again like usual. It isn't about bad teeth. Veneers are cosmetic. Yes, they're used by people with bad teeth, but they're also used by people with excellent teeth who'd prefer a constant white or whatever shade smile. This is were cosmetic dentistry is different in LA than the rest of the country.

    It isn't unheard of for someone with resources to spend $10-30,000 on their teeth to make their already great teeth even better and glamorous.
    --- Post Merged, May 2, 2019 ---
    Pretty sure I wasn't implying it was.

    They're right, but I wasn't talking about fluoride. That isn't the actives I was bringing up.

    Manual is alright if you do it right. Most people don't. Electric is the best choice. However, ideally a rotating head is better from a start point over an ultrasonic head. The studies out there give it a slight edge, but in a regular setting and most dentists would say a Sonicare has a learning curve before a patient can get all the plaque on their teeth. Rotating heads cup each tooth and it's generally easier. The downside is it's loud as heck.

    Crest doesn't use much humectants in their toothpaste and thus it's a little dryer. Crest paste and gels usually rank higher on the abrasion scale. And most of them today have stannous fluoride, which in some people can lead to xerostomia, also known as dry mouth.

    As of this post it appears Colgate has removed triclosan from their paste which is disappointing, and gone with stannous fluoride which poses other issues aside from dry mouth. Thankfully I've got 30 boxes good until 2023. Go Costco!

    So triclosan, if I'm not mistaken, was delivered and attached itself to the surfaces of the teeth via a biodegradable polymer. It would shed away in X amount of hours, but what it did was prevent plaque build up even if you had a CHO rich diet, but it also killed a significant portion of s.mutans during that X hour span.

    You'll probably see sugar alcohols used in the future in toothpaste because repeated exposure to them causes s.mutans to become "extinct" in the oral cavity. The only reason you don't see it in pastes much today is their relatively high cost. Typically a mouth should get exposed to 1-2 g, 2-3x a day for it to be effective.

    Stannous fluoride is good stuff, but it can cause aesthetic problems down the road. Nothing a dental cleaning won't fix, but it's an unnecessary cost.
    --- Post Merged, May 2, 2019 ---
    I'm going to head up stores tomorrow to buy whatever stock I can find with Triclosan. Stupid health nuts and their fringe research.
     

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