Dems seek to close the God Gap

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by dswoodley, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. dswoodley macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    Ahhh, at least Christians and other followers of faith have some role in the Democratic bid to win in 2008.

    Link


     
  2. janey macrumors 603

    janey

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    #2
    Yuck.

    I'd like the candidates to start talking about contraceptives and abortion rights now.

    :D
     
  3. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #3
    I once told my mom that I strongly disagreed with Republicans and that I was thinking of registering as a Democrat, and she told me that it wasn't possible to be a Christian and Democrat. It made me even more angry at Republicans...
     
  4. dswoodley thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    I am fascinated by this post. Once in the pre-Kennedy years, it was the Democrats who were the God Squad.
     
  5. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #5
    ""It has to be authentic. This is not about Jesus-ing up the party, so to speak ... It just won't work if it's seen as a cynical ploy," said Mara Vanderslice, a Democratic strategist and evangelical Christian."

    She's got that right.

    I'm no Bible thumper, and I don't have a lot of use for the super-fundamentalist sort. That said, though, I don't understand the antipathy against religion per se that goes on. All the rants against religion.

    As I watch people, the main reason folks seem to be against religion is that it demands self-discipline and an adherence to non-destructive behavior. People really dislike the former, and seem too enamored of the latter.

    Of course, Atheism is just as much a religion as Christianity. They're both faith-based belief systems. One has faith that there is no God; the other, that there is.

    Neither faith will know, this side of the graveyard. :D

    'Rat
     
  6. dswoodley thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Well said 'Rat! though I suspect you may have opened a can of worms!
     
  7. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    I think he did to. I once said pretty much the same thing awhile ago in another thread, and it was not taken well. For some reason, it is argued as something other than faith, but I'm not sure what it is yet...
     
  8. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #8
    I think a lot of it is that if people can't prove there is or isn't a god they don't want to talk about it. I am a confirmed Catholic but am not a practicing follower. I believe but do not go to church on a regular basis. Nor am I Republican or Democrat. The whole religious wig nut debate is what I don't like.
     
  9. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #9
    What many of us dislike about it is how it tries to write itself into law and also tries to deny scientific fact. I have my own personal reasons for despising it- in my experience it's a way for many to hate and attempt to legally harm others with whom they disagree. Either this is a free country or it isn't. If you want to live your life according to a religion- fine. But leave the rest of us alone.

    That said, I find this trend in the democratic party disturbing.

    Consider said can of worms open.
     
  10. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #10
    I agree that there should be a separation, but not all religious people are crack pots like this forum would want to believe.
     
  11. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

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    It's easy for non-Christians to see Christianity as negative, because I think that many Christians are misguided or confused.

    The question is the placement of the carrot. Many Christians, and even more anti-Christians see the carrot (the promise of salvation) as being on a stick in front of you. They see that a Christian must be good and follow the rules to be saved. I think that the carrot is behind me. My salvation is a past occurrence, something which has been attained for me without any work on my own part.
     
  12. dswoodley thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Just out of curiousity, are you disturbed because the Democrats are pandering to a group with which they must make inroads to win in 2008, or because they might actually be Christians? I find both disturbing, but for different reasons.
     
  13. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #13
    The big problem is the "born again" Christians that want to force feed religion to the masses.
     
  14. killerrobot macrumors 68020

    killerrobot

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    #14
    Wasn't Religion suppose to be separate from State?
    I don't care about a candidate's religious beliefs, he/she could be Muslim for all I care -- whoooo, bad word, I know---- I care about him/her getting the US's nose out of places it shouldn't be, boosting the economy, and getting an f"·%"·%& health care system for everyone, just like Jesus/Muhamed/Vishnu/etc. would do.:)
     
  15. dswoodley thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    and a rather narrowly dogmatic interpretation of scripture that can't help but echo the fire and brimstone era of America's past doesn't help.
     
  16. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    Could the argument be made that JFK was the first president to really bring religion into The White House.
     
  17. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #17
    I've started noticing, that religious or not, the right thing to do in almost every situation is what Jesus (et. all) would do. Help the needy, help the poor, the sick, the weary... Hmmm... doesn't that sound like Democrats more than Republicans? :)
     
  18. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #18
    Only the first part of your statement disturbs me. If they are actually Christians, that's fine. I don't care what your beliefs are. It shouldn't even be relevant. However, I have my doubts that there is any such thing as an actual Christian politician. They worship power more than anything.
     
  19. killerrobot macrumors 68020

    killerrobot

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    #19
    I think the party might be more like Libertarian or Green or dare I say it, Socialist, but yeah, I'll settle for anyone that does the right thing. :)
     
  20. adrianblaine macrumors 65816

    adrianblaine

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    #20
    I was sticking to the two major parties, but yeah, I'd agree with you...
     
  21. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #21
    It could- although I don't think that was his fault. I'd say it was his opponents who brought it up.
     
  22. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

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    #22
    The US government doesn't need religion inorder to function. In fact, it was specifically designed so. We were trying to get away from the English form of government which used the church as its basis of power- granting the king absolute power over his subjects. Th efounding fathers new that the king was a fallible, mortal man and wanted their government to be based on reason rather than the will and whims of a single, perhaps flawed, maybe malicious man. Throwing the power of the church behind the government creates an unassailable and unaccountable power. The Constitution was designed to prevent that. Wat too many people have forgotten that.
     
  23. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #23
    Sometimes I wonder if American history is even taught anymore. It's alarming the number of people who don't understand that one basic idea.

    It's also alarming how many people will call you anti-American for bringing it up.
     
  24. imac/cheese macrumors 6502a

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    Eisenhower was the first president to actually join a church while in office and he also gave us the "under God" in the pledge of allegiance. Many of the early presidents were very religious. JFK was the first that I know of to bring a religious controversy to the White House because he was the first Catholic and many people worried he would take orders from the Pope.
     
  25. dswoodley thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Just my two cents of history - this isn't quite accurate. By the time the colonists were getting disgruntled with the mother country, 1760s, GB had long since stopped being an authoritative monarchy. The Glorious Revolution which ousted James II saw to that. His successors William, Mary and Anne claimed the same powers, though clearly in practice they didn't have them. Heck, George I didn't even speak passable English. The colonists objection was equally against Parliament - every bit as obnoxious as the King. But this is just me being a history dork. Carry on.
     

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