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GroundLoop

macrumors 68000
Mar 21, 2003
1,561
35
Anybody know the exact nature of this bug? I wonder if it turned the 20" iMac into an explosive device.

Hickman
 
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Photorun

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2003
1,216
0
NYC
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.
 
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awulf

macrumors 6502
Mar 1, 2002
483
1
South Australia
Originally posted by Photorun
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.
Ah, damn... So that's why my socks have been going.

10.3.3 probably caused some sort of hardware failure to be pulled as a seed. I wonder how many Macs are harmed during the making of Mac OS X.
 
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mustang_dvs

macrumors 6502a
Feb 9, 2003
694
13
Durham, NC
Actually...

The bug involving the 20-inch iMac was a fairly localized one.

It would only affect users living in small southern California town. According to internal Apple documents, if 7F24 was installed on a 20-inch iMac in this small town, an ancient prophecy would be fulfilled and a portal known as the "Hellmouth" would open, swallowing the town and unleashing ten thousand years of unmitigated evil upon humanity.

All in all, I think pulling the seed was a bit of an over-reaction on Apple's part.
 
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MongoTheGeek

macrumors 68040
Re: Actually...

Originally posted by mustang_dvs
The bug involving the 20-inch iMac was a fairly localized one.

It would only affect users living in small southern California town. According to internal Apple documents, if 7F24 was installed on a 20-inch iMac in this small town, an ancient prophecy would be fulfilled and a portal known as the "Hellmouth" would open, swallowing the town and unleashing ten thousand years of unmitigated evil upon humanity.

All in all, I think pulling the seed was a bit of an over-reaction on Apple's part.

Can't be any worse than what comes out of Redmond on a daily basis.
 
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dho

macrumors 6502
Sep 7, 2003
279
0
California
Originally posted by Photorun
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.

I believe what you are refering to is longhorn. :)
 
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sabbath999

macrumors member
Jun 9, 2003
79
0
rural Missouri
Originally posted by Photorun
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.

Dude, you forgot the part about the pigmy mummies!
 
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iriejedi

macrumors 6502a
Oct 4, 2000
820
120
Nor Cal
Opinion?

As much as my creative imagination wants to explain how the gnomes are going to turn stolen underpants into profit....

Anyone here 'the' rumor that the 10.3.3 release (final version - after portal to Redmond uh I mean Hell is closed) - will be the installed version on Gen 2 G5s?


Irie
 
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johnnyjibbs

macrumors 68030
Sep 18, 2003
2,959
119
London, UK
Reading the info on 10.3.3, I like the areas it is focusing on...:)

I guess it didn't like something in the new 20" iMacs. What I don't understand is that the 17" and 20" iMacs are identical apart from the screen size, so what sort of bug could cause something 'mission criticle" on the 20" version? It doesn't sound like data loss issues to me.
 
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iriejedi

macrumors 6502a
Oct 4, 2000
820
120
Nor Cal
Extention Problem

10.3.3 made the necks of the iMac extend and lock for > 4 hours at a time requiring medical attenton

The FDA is requiring new warning labels!
 
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Photorun

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2003
1,216
0
NYC
Oh no, those gnomes would seem like candystripers compared to minions unleashed by Longhorn, legend will call these vile types "Windows users," I ... I can't say anymore, the visions are too painful.
 
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Snowy_River

macrumors 68030
Jul 17, 2002
2,519
0
Corvallis, OR
Originally posted by Photorun
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.

How would they respond to my sock drawer, where none of my socks are paired? I just have a couple dozen white sock, all identical, about a dozen black socks, all identical, about a dozen wool socks, all identical, etc...
 
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Snowy_River

macrumors 68030
Jul 17, 2002
2,519
0
Corvallis, OR
Originally posted by johnnyjibbs
Reading the info on 10.3.3, I like the areas it is focusing on...:)

I guess it didn't like something in the new 20" iMacs. What I don't understand is that the 17" and 20" iMacs are identical apart from the screen size, so what sort of bug could cause something 'mission criticle" on the 20" version? It doesn't sound like data loss issues to me.

The 17" isn't big enough for the portal to form...

:D :p
 
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pgwalsh

macrumors 68000
Jun 21, 2002
1,639
218
New Zealand
Originally posted by Photorun
Oh no, those gnomes would seem like candystripers compared to minions unleashed by Longhorn, legend will call these vile types "Windows users," I ... I can't say anymore, the visions are too painful.
haha you're too much.. haha..
 
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dudeami

macrumors regular
Feb 4, 2004
120
0
Texas
If this is true, it does not give me any warm-and-fuzzies about Apple's developement process. I mean what goes on out there?

.... "Hey Bob, I think this code looks ready to go. Let's install it on two or three machines for ... oh about half a day. If nothing bad happens let's just send it to our devoted testers, willing to put there machines at risk, and see if we can ruin anything. If we do, I'm sure they'll continue to love testing our next software upgrade as well."

"Sounds good to me Joe. We'll be done before lunch. Let's do it."
 
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iriejedi

macrumors 6502a
Oct 4, 2000
820
120
Nor Cal
Gnome Basher

Originally posted by dudeami
If this is true, it does not give me any warm-and-fuzzies about Apple's developement process. I mean what goes on out there?

.... "Hey Bob, I think this code looks ready to go. Let's install it on two or three machines for ... oh about half a day. If nothing bad happens let's just send it to our devoted testers, willing to put there machines at risk, and see if we can ruin anything. If we do, I'm sure they'll continue to love testing our next software upgrade as well."

"Sounds good to me Joe. We'll be done before lunch. Let's do it."

Uh - how many times did you use Tester in you critism - do you NOT know what testing is all about - you MUST be a windows users as Microsoft does not pay for 'devoted testers' they use the CONSUMER!
 
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dudeami

macrumors regular
Feb 4, 2004
120
0
Texas
I may be incorrect on this. However I would think that a dev seed would mean that this is sent to an external beta test group that is not getting paid to test this. This should be similar to a pilot group on a software deployment, and should be used to determine if there are minor bugs, not that the software will destroy enough computers in two-three days of testing that you determine you need to "recall" the software. And yes, M$ has developed a bad reputation that has basically forced it's user comunity to be very cautious about applying their "fixes". I would like to see Apple have a better reputation then that. Especially with their efforts to enter into the enterprise market. The fact that the software had that adverse an effect, would lead me to believe that it really should still have been in alpha testing, and should not have been a release candidate. If this software and Safari were both seeded at the same time, as the rumor has it, how much time do they normally allow for software to go from this seed to production?
 
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dudeami

macrumors regular
Feb 4, 2004
120
0
Texas
Also in my mind there is also a history being established that they are not performing enough due diligence on their testing. I think it was 10.2.8 that was released for consumers (not testers) to use in production, only to dissapear from their website shortly thereafter. Then about three weeks it was released again, along with a fix for the older version of 10.2.8. Also I would think that they should be selective enough about their beta testers to get a broad enough group to properly represent their user community. I don't think this was the case when Apple was "surprised" by the fact the Panther was destroying a large amount of firewire drives on consumers systems.
 
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Dont Hurt Me

macrumors 603
Dec 21, 2002
6,055
6
Yahooville S.C.
Originally posted by johnnyjibbs
Reading the info on 10.3.3, I like the areas it is focusing on...:)

I guess it didn't like something in the new 20" iMacs. What I don't understand is that the 17" and 20" iMacs are identical apart from the screen size, so what sort of bug could cause something 'mission criticle" on the 20" version? It doesn't sound like data loss issues to me.
I agree , what could be so different in the 20" but not in the 17"? runs at a different resolution? seems like a very lame excuse with no details.
 
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windowsblowsass

macrumors 6502a
Jan 25, 2004
613
137
pa
Originally posted by Photorun
It made the 20 inch iMac explode and implode at the same time causing an antimatter hole through which evil gnomes devoid of cloaking need would come into this world and steal one of each pair of socks for everyone on the planet. It would have been really really bad.
they would have stolen underpants hence their name the underpantsgnomes they also had a three step plan to take over
1.collect underpants
2....
3.PROFIT!!
 
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chickengrease16

macrumors member
Apr 21, 2003
47
0
Tallahassee, FL
i installed mac os x 10.3.3 on my 15" powerbook and it runs fine -- sortof. safari is a bit flaky (1.2 beta i think), and it hangs at random times with the spinning color wheel. i'm happy with the improvements, nonetheless. tabbing to buttons and drop downs (which works in most aqua programs as well!) is an amazing feature. way to go, apple!
 
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MacSlut

macrumors 6502
Aug 12, 2002
250
3
Bar
Dev seeds come with HUGE warning

Originally posted by dudeami
I may be incorrect on this. However I would think that a dev seed would mean that this is sent to an external beta test group that is not getting paid to test this. This should be similar to a pilot group on a software deployment, and should be used to determine if there are minor bugs, not that the software will destroy enough computers in two-three days of testing that you determine you need to "recall" the software. And yes, M$ has developed a bad reputation that has basically forced it's user comunity to be very cautious about applying their "fixes". I would like to see Apple have a better reputation then that. Especially with their efforts to enter into the enterprise market. The fact that the software had that adverse an effect, would lead me to believe that it really should still have been in alpha testing, and should not have been a release candidate. If this software and Safari were both seeded at the same time, as the rumor has it, how much time do they normally allow for software to go from this seed to production?

Do you actually know what the issue was with the 20" iMac? If not, then how do you know how much testing was done in house at Apple before releasing this to developers? It may have been a fairly innocuous issue that only showed up during unusual settings/configurations.

Dev seeds come with HUGE warnings in regards to only installing on Macs dedicated for testing purposes and never on a production or mission critical Mac.

Certainly, if this seed did physical damage to the 20" iMacs under common settings/configurations, then it was a blunder by Apple, but more than likely this isn't the case (otherwise we would've heard of exploding iMacs or whatever).

The fact of the matter is that the number of Macs, the number of configuration and setting possibilities along with all the software available makes it impossible to thoroughly test in-house in a timely manner to provide updates to consumers.

Most professional developers understand this, and would be able to overcome any *likely* problems a bad seed would cause by zapping PRAM, reformatting the hard drive and reinstalling the OS and the software they develop...hell this is an extremely routine procedure you do on a regular basis as you're developing new iterations of your own software.
 
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