Do you think America is a Corporatocracy?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by G51989, Jul 1, 2014.

  1. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #1
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bruce-e-levine/the-myth-of-us-democracy-corporatocracy_b_836573.html

    This is a little old, and I think it is gotten worse.

    Do you think America is a Corporatocracy?

    I think it is.

    Poll attached.
     
  2. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #2
    It'd be foolish to look around, see how power operates in the country, and not reach that conclusion.
     
  3. G51989, Jul 1, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014

    G51989 thread starter macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #3
    I think only the very delusion would think America is a country run by the people for the people.

    America is a great example of what not to be.

    The poll is pretty clear already.
     
  4. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #4
    I think its fairly safe to say that corporations enjoy an outsize role in the drafting and passage of laws and regulations in this country. But I'd hesitate before say the United States is a "corporatocracy." I just don't think that is an accurate description of our current political reality.

    For one thing, "corporations" don't all want the same thing. And, in many instances, one set of corporations want the exact polar opposite of some other group. Some corporations support Democratic candidates, some support Republicans, and some spread their money around.

    Lets also recognize that corporations sometimes play a useful role in creating both legislation and regulation. And that corporate executives can play a useful role working for the Government.

    If there has been one signal failure in American politics over the past ~ 30 years, it is the failure of labor - organized or otherwise - to gets its voice heard in America's Capitol and Statehouses. As a result power has inexorably shifted to the point that labor has suffered in terms of wages and benefits, at the expense of corporations.

    But that doesn't make our Democracy a failure. Nor does it mean that the situation cannot be reversed.
     
  5. G51989 thread starter macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #5
    Read this

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporatocracy

    I would say its dead on.

    They do tend to want the same thing, relaxed labor laws, lower wages, free trade, cheaper outsourcing, and subsidized wages and being able to pay nearly no taxes.

    Also, Republicans and Democrats are both bought and paid for by big money.

    Little to no difference.

    Any examples of this?

    I say this, because I can't think were any excutives have " helped ". Considering they played a big part in pushing America out of the First world.

    And yes, I don't consider America a first world country.

    More like a 2nd world country.

    Correction, Reaganomics, and the deceleration of war on labor, corporate propaganda that all " unions are bad! " has led to it. Once Regan fired the air traffic controls, union busting and the destruction of the American Middle class started.

    It is that thinking that has led America to be a second world country.

    Yes, our Democracy is a failure.

    A very small elite call all the shots, while " we the people " is ignored.
     
  6. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #6
    BOTH democrats & republicans have sold out to corporations. war is even pushed by democrats , BOTH sides complain about issues when the "other" side is in power, when elected BOTH sides continue down the same path they complained during the election cycle, people are stupid enough to keep falling for it over & over & over .
     
  7. G51989 thread starter macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #7
    That is EXACTLY what I mean, and what this writing means.

    Dead on.
     
  8. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #8
    If our Democracy is failing, it is because increasingly the electorate is allowing themselves to be distracted from what is really important. Case in point:

    And thats the thing. Of all the issues facing our country - from slow wage growth, unemployment, healthcare, foreign policy, privacy, etc. etc. - fully half the electorate seems to think guns are the most important.

    If you think about it, in the average American's lifetime, dentistry is about a thousand times more important to their comfort, health, happiness, and (probably) economic success than gun ownership. But when is the last time you heard a politician talking about dental care?

    And yet this one issue seems to take up an inordinate amount of our time.

    I don't want to take away anyone's guns. I just want people to shut the fXXX up about them and pay attention to whats really important.
     
  9. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #9
    It is, in part. The other part is Plutocracy. They overlap a lot, and, Hobby Lobby is one perfect example, albeit somewhat small fry compared to the big fish. Here is a list of the largest privately held corporations in the U.S.:

    http://www.forbes.com/largest-private-companies/list/

    Top ten:

    Cargill
    Koch Industries
    Dell
    Bechtel
    Mars
    PricewaterhouseCoopers
    Pilot Flying J
    Publix
    Love's Travel Stops
    Ernst and Young

    The original list is the top 100, and, there are some pretty big and famous companies further down on the list, like Cox, Toys R Us, Fidelity Investments, Heinz ... Koch Industries is the poster boy for both Plutocracy and Corporatocracy combined.

    Increasingly, the super-rich don't need to share control with us mere mortals, as their share of wealth ownership grows ever larger, and this frees them up from shareholder constraints and allows them to put their money to work politically, increasing their power further.
     
  10. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #10
    That's a really good, albeit very sad, point. Of all the things that we need to work on, the thing these people latch onto is their ability to shoot other people.

    Unemployment? Guns!
    Welfare and wages? Ammo!
    Health? Arms!!

    You see it on here, too. People list important topics, or reasons they want to live certain places, and guns often top the list. I get wanting the freedom to own a gun, but seeing it as one of the single most important things in the world is truly bizarre.
     
  11. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #11
    Are we a corpocracy? Might as well take a poll on whether the pope is still Catholic.

    While I do think both parties have sold us out on the whole, I believe the Democrats to have some individuals who are more patriotic than that. Sherrod Brown and Elizabeth Warren are a couple of principled progressives that come to mind. The trouble is, they're not nearly in the majority of their own party, much less Congress, which is why the Democratic Party comes across as little more than Republican Lite.
     
  12. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #12
    Elizabeth Warren? Isn't she the one who built a career by lying about being a "Native American"?
     
  13. zin macrumors 6502

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    #13
    Nope.
     
  14. Merkava_4 macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Yes I do; most definitely absolutely.
     
  15. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #15
    I see 1900 time frame as a of low point (a high point for Corporatocracy) , the New Deal Era as the big pushback and an era of hope for the average citizen. Since then conservative forces have been conspiring, continually working to undo these advances, moving us back to 1900 and they are succeeding. I don't see another push back until things get bad enough for the populace in general, whenever that occurs. As long as a large group of average citizens fools themselves into believing the GOP or the Tea Party has their best interests at heart, we will slide down seeking a bottom from which we can rebound from.

    When the options are considered, an effective and fair central authority is the only hope for average citizens. As a class of citizen, they won't find security and financial comfort in anarchy, nor in a corporatocracy without oversight that upholds the ideals the country was founded upon, and definitely not in a plutocracy which eventually will lead to revolution.

    Although Communism has historically failed and Socialism is relatively limited, I'd argue that when a government can eventually function without greed and corruption (a reflection of human beings), these types of systems seem to be the path forward. With advances in technology, Capitalism with its unequal distribution of wealth seems to be a dead end for the advancement of society.
     
  16. VulchR macrumors 68020

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    #16
    While I think corporations are worrisome in terms of their power, they're really a front for the overly wealthy. The main issue is inequality of opportunity, which boils down to inequality of wealth.
     
  17. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #17
    there's definitely been a back and forth....even so I'd say things were much worse at the start of the 20th century than they are now, despite that corporations have managed a huge victory with the whole sham "free trade" fiasco in recent decades. Clearly we're in a time when the self interests of the wealthy don't coincide with the best interests of the country
     
  18. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #18
    Being dependent upon a perpetual cycle of ever increasing consumption, capitalism itself doesn't coincide with the best interests of the planet, given the fact that the planet's resources are finite. Eventually, the system will either evolve, or die...
     
  19. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #19
    Real problem is people in general are not united. Too much diversity .... religiously, culturally, morally, ethnically, financially, and etc. It's easy for corporations to get away with having so much influence over politics without worrying about a mass push against it. Politicians will always distract common causes with bipolar causes.
     
  20. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #20
    Ten dollar toasters, the latest/greatest tech toys, and 32 flavors of ice cream are probably even bigger distractions.
     
  21. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #21
    Yea, your right about that. Consumerism is a pacifier.
     
  22. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

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    #22
    it's easy to knock consumption, but somebody has to make those ten dollar toasters so jobs are created......somewhere....... and if they're created where the toasters are consumed (crunch crunch crunch :D ) then there're benefits besides the quick rush of profit for a corporation
     
  23. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #23
    But the balance is what's missing. A small business can make hundreds of $10 toasters daily using machine production, several QC employees, several manual labor employees, one maintenance employee, and just hire an outside mechanic when needed.

    The ratio of workers vs spenders is out of whack. Not really a great example, but you know what I mean.
     
  24. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #24
    only if the jobs are somewhere else....fewer workers making some specific item that's going to sell for less also means that consumers will be able to afford and buy a greater variety of things, all of which have to be made and that means more jobs. When you break the connection between local jobs and consumption, well that's created the problem we've seen develop over the last several decades as politicians offer corporations tax incentives to send those jobs abroad
     
  25. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #25
    A planet with finite resources can't sustain cycles of ever increasing consumption indefinitely. Sooner or later, we'll have to settle for living within our means.
     

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