Do you think Christian Titman, a Native American, should be able to wear this feather to graduation?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Hieveryone, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

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    #1
    Titman, a high school graduate and Native American, wants to wear a feather his father gave him. It is a symbol of his achievement.

    I think it is great that he wants to wear it. We are a diverse nation and I love seeing people expressing themselves be it Native American, gay, alternative lifestyle, whatever.

    I'm a HUGE fan of diversity. Love it.

    But I think the school bans ALL signs of religion.

    So then should they allow him or not?

    http://news.yahoo.com/student-seeks-court-order-don-eagle-feather-graduation-152319400.html
     
  2. impulse462 Suspended

    impulse462

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    What they should do is allow all students to express any signs of their religious heritage if they want. Whats the point in living if you can't celebrate what makes you unique?
     
  3. tunerX Suspended

    tunerX

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    I saw this thing happen in AIT for the Army. A recent graduate from basic had an eagle feather as part of his belongings. His father gave it to him for passing basic. He had it in his foot locker and it was found during a health and welfare. This female drill sergeant went ballistic on him; smoked him for at least an hour. Then tried to get him an article 15... His tribal council came in and crapped all over 305th MI, the BN CDR, CO CDR, and all of the drills.

    He got to keep his feather and nobody got punished.

    I think anyone should allow any person to express their religious beliefs. Just don't force me to take part in any aspect of your religion.
     
  4. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    Let them wear feathers or give them America back.
     
  5. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    Let him wear his feather and let others wear their symbol.
    Different religions and different cultures make the world a unique place.
     
  6. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #6
    So does that mean the school bans students from wearing a cross around their neck? Because I'm sure that would go over really well with all of the Christians in this country who have a persecution complex.
     
  7. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    Who has a persecution complex? This kid took his school to court so we could wear a feather in his cap. That is a persecution complex. Anyway, let the kid wear his feather. Isn't graduation day supposed to be about the students? It's his day, not the stupid school administrators day.
     
  8. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    Entitlement thinking. First of all, does he have a mother? If he does, it is her day, not his. A grandmother, an aunt? The ceremony is for the people who got him through school, and, to recognize his joining the adult world.

    Secondly, although arresting people who break the rules is really, really stupid, there need to be some rules for the ceremony, don't you think? Is it OK for a student to show up drunk? I mean, it's his day. :rolleyes:

    Finally, if it is a religious display, how far can it go? Is it OK to show up in a burka? That's why we need the courts in the U.S. -- to decide how to balance everyone rights.
     
  9. impulse462 Suspended

    impulse462

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    Wow you must live such a great life, will all the love affairs you have with rules.
     
  10. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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  11. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    I say let him wear it; the cap and gown are as much a symbol as the feather. Bans on religious apparel or symbols seem to achieve nothing but ill will... you don't achieve harmony and acceptance by denying expression. He's respecting both the ceremony and his background so have at it.
     
  12. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #12
    False dichotomy. A common logical fallacy.
     
  13. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #13
    The drunk student and "how far can it go" may be a false dichotomy... But the burka question may still hold, if only to highlight religious bias (or some other reason) that one can support one expression of religion and not the other.
     
  14. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #14
    A cap and gown cover almost as much as a burka.
     
  15. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    It would also be quite hot to wear those on a June afternoon in California... a valid reason not to wear one, but a reason not based in any bias. :D
     
  16. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

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    What I don't understand is why the school bans all forms of religious expression. Isn't diversity the crux of this country?

    If a Muslim wears a Burka, or a Native American wears a feather, a Christian a Cross, a Hindu an OM, and so on...

    To me that's a BEAUTIFUL graduation.
     
  17. Praxis91 macrumors regular

    Praxis91

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    Because the progressive utopia is to eliminate religions such as Christianity and have the population worship the almighty state.
     
  18. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    It's the LAZY way of handling cultural religious issues. And sometimes it's the LAZY way to be bias. Instead of admitting bias for specific religions, it's easier for them to exclude all.
     
  19. Huntn, Jun 4, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2015

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #19
    Is a North American Indian feather a religious symbol?
     
  20. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #20
    I think this is pretty black and white, school says no religious symbols then there are no religious symbols without exception. Don't like the rules don't participate you'll still get your diploma and it doesn't change your transcripts.
     
  21. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    Reductio ad absurdum. He can't do whatever he wants because it is "his" day (which it isn't, anyway, it is his mother's day).
     
  22. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    Actually, I don't care generally. I think the graduation "uniform" is outdated. But, if you are going to have a uniform, then, naturally, there is a limited amount of deviation allowed or it isn't uniform any more, is it?

    non sequitur
     
  23. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    Were they Apaches living on Thunder Mountain? How the hell did they get on post?
     
  24. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #24
    Like many such stories, its a bit more complicated once you get into the details.

    The School District wanted every student to appear uniform in their cap and gown at the graduation. Its rule prohibited people from putting leis, boas, or bits of sticky tape spelling out "Hi Mom!" on the mortarboard. Reasonable enough.

    The problem with the "religious symbols" rule is this: It doesn't apply to a a crucifix or star of David worn on a chain under the gown. It doesn't apply to a kippah (or even, I guess) a turban worn under the mortarboard.

    It only really applies to the native american feather.

    Fortunately we live in a country with not only a written Constitution setting forth our rights; but we also have private organizations like the ACLU to help individuals - regardless of wealth or position - stand up for them. And we have a court system where such disputes are given a fair and open hearing. And where resolutions to such conflicts can be peacefully worked out.

    Which is what happened here. And this kid got to wear his feather at Graduation. Which is cool.
     
  25. Tomorrow macrumors 604

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    I would say for daily wear, let the guy wear his feather. Let someone wear a cross, a crescent, a star, or whatever their symbol is.

    At graduation, where you're wearing a "uniform" of sorts, I would say put all those away until you change back into your regular clothes.
     

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