Do you use British English, American or some different kind of English?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by kabunaru, Aug 10, 2008.

?

What English do you use?

  1. British English

    45.2%
  2. American English

    43.5%
  3. Australian English

    4.8%
  4. Some other English dialect

    6.5%
  1. kabunaru Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    #1
    Just interested in this. What English dialect do you use for writing and I guess every day life?
    Yes, there is some difference between British English and American English (a long article):
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_differences

    Even though the English language is not my native language, I have learned British English. I am well aware of Australian English and there is an Australian English option in OS X (click Apple-Shift-: in Safari or TextEdit). So far, I do not see any difference between Australian English and British English.

    So, what English dialect do you use? There's many:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_dialects

    It's just that British and American are the most common ones.
     
  2. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #2
    American English, with a hint of Canadian dialect. I grew up in northern Pennsylvania, north of Amish country, which means we were pretty much cut off from the rest of American culture.
     
  3. vniow macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2002
    Location:
    I accidentally my whole location.
    #3
    Some words look funny without a "u" in them IMO, and having a "z" instead of an "s" in some words (like realise for example) seem to make more phonetic sense to me if I were to write down what I hear coming from my mouth. My accent is, despite being a Californian, is somewhat of a mishmash of several. Almost everyone I've asked about how I sound gives me a different answer (and my friends poke fun at my accent accordingly) and when I write, I use aspects of the dialects which make the most phonetic sense.

    That was a weird answer.
     
  4. OttawaGuy macrumors 6502a

    OttawaGuy

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2006
  5. wadejc85 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Location:
    PA
    #5
    American English - South-Central Pennsylvania
     
  6. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    #6
    I'm a native Californian, so naturally I use American English. However, my father was born and raised in Rhodesia, and when I was growing up, I picked up many expressions and pronunciations from him, so at times I say words with a very interesting emphasis. :p
     
  7. kretzy macrumors 604

    kretzy

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2004
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    #7
    Well being from Australia...

    Australian English is essentially the same as British English but I suppose the only thing that really differs is the some of the vernacular and slang.
     
  8. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #8
    I speak the English without the accent; I guess that makes it American English. ;) :p
     
  9. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #9
    American English with touches of a New England accent...fahhhg and lahhhgs and such. :p
     
  10. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #10
    It is different. Or at least the accent is clearly different. It sounds a lot like the British accent but enough off to make you have to think about it.

    I had a prof from Australia. Biggest reason how I pick up the difference.

    Me personally I speak American English with a very slight Texan accent (words here and there) but over all I do not carry any real accent.
     
  11. apsterling macrumors 6502a

    apsterling

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2007
    #11
    American with a hint of Canadian (cause my parents lived in Buffalo)

    So I oo too much.
     
  12. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    #12
    american english. i don't see why its ever a big deal though. different regions means different slang/accents even in the same country.
     
  13. joepunk macrumors 68030

    joepunk

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Location:
    a profane existence
    #13
    Wow! I had no idea that we actually do have a unique northwest dialect. Growing up I always thought that an accent was something that other people had. Still do too.

    So, I guess I speak Northwest American/Canadian English or something.
     
  14. thechidz macrumors 68000

    thechidz

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Location:
    New York City
    #14
    I speak wisconsin english:p new jersey english kind of annoys me;)
     
  15. ZiggyPastorius macrumors 68040

    ZiggyPastorius

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Location:
    Berklee College of Music
    #15
    This is speaking or writing? Writing, I use British English, but wouldn't the Englishes just be same spoken except for the accent?

    So I guess my answer is: I'm American, and I use British English.
     
  16. Ntombi macrumors 68030

    Ntombi

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Bostonian exiled in SoCal
    #16
    American English

    Dialect: Northeastern

    I was raised in the Boston area, but I don't have what non-Bostonians think of as a Boston accent, no "Pahk the cah in Hahvad Yahd," and not Boston Brahman (think Kennedy), but my speech patterns would be recognizable to any northeasterner/New Englander. :)


    With all that said, I'm a bit of an Anglophile, and I love all the flavors of English speech patterns, and of those of the UK in general.
     
  17. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #17
    I use US American English;)

    There are different forms of American English. i.e. Canadian, US...
     
  18. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #18
    When did we annex Canada? ;)

    ...Perhaps you were thinking of North American English?
     
  19. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #19
    Same difference.:rolleyes::p
     
  20. Jaffa Cake macrumors Core

    Jaffa Cake

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    The City of Culture, Englandshire
    #20
    'British' English here, as for my spoken dialect that would be a Yorkshire one - a mix of East Riding and Hull to be precise. I'm not sure why the dialect link listed Humberside as there is no Humberside dialect, this region covered The East Riding, Hull and part of Lincolnshire, all of which have quite different and distinct ways of speaking.
     
  21. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Location:
    England
    #21
    I use English English, or just English as we tend to call it around here.
     
  22. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    Location:
    Toronteazy
    #22
    I grew up surrounded by a bit of Newfoundland English and the Ottawa Valley Twang, but I speak Canadian English.
     
  23. pivo6 macrumors 68000

    pivo6

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2002
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #23
    American English, like what was used in the movie Fargo.
     
  24. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, England
    #24
    I voted other because I'm ALL mixed up. I'm an American but I live in England and so my words and spelling of them are somewhere in the middle of that.
     
  25. thechidz macrumors 68000

    thechidz

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2007
    Location:
    New York City
    #25
    actually I changed my mind, I speak Olde English... beer that is:p
     

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