Does running CPU at 100% damage/reduce the life of MBP's?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by snerkler, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. snerkler macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    #1
    I've recently been converting some DVD's using handbrake and I've noticed that the CPU usage ranges from 98-100% causing the fans to go crazy, however I've never seen CPU temps go above 63 degrees C. Will running the CPUs at max capacity damage them or reduce the life expectancy? I've got maybe 40-50 DVDs to convert and each takes around 20mins to convert.

    You used to be able to change the number of threads that handbrake used to reduce the strain on the CPUs but it appears that this option has been removed in the latest update (1.1.2).

    Cheers.

    P.S. I've got a 2017 touch bar MBP with 2.9GHz i7 processor, 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM.
     
  2. deadworlds macrumors 65816

    deadworlds

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    Citrus Heights,CA
    #2
    Modern CPUs are designed to work hard and are within regular operating limits up to 100 degrees celsius. Also your i7 processor technically has 4 cored each able to process 2 threads for a total of 8 threads. Seeing your CPU use 100% is actually only utilizing one core(400% = all cores in use). If the CPU ,or any other critical component, were to reach unstable temperatures the CPU will either throttle (reduce Clock speed) or shutdown the computer to prevent damage to the computer.

    Use your computer as intended and don't worry about how hard you are pushing the CPU unless its causing an actual issue with the operation of the machine. Enjoy your computer.
     
  3. snerkler thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    #3
    Thanks for the reply. When I say 100% I mean 100% as outlined by system monitor, which is actually 790% plus if I look at the CPU usage in activity monitor. But based on your reply it's temps I need to be concerned with and not CPU usage, in which case it's fine. Thanks :)
     
  4. leman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #4
    Short answer: no

    Long answer: yes, it will, but we are still talking about decades of operation. Your laptop will fail long before the heat gets it, of unrelated reasons (usually an inherent weakness in one of its components) or you will retire it before it happens.
     
  5. _Kiki_ macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2017
    #5
    that's not true, actual lifespan modern laptop is around few years max, non-leaded soldered joints will break up subjected to constant heat, but TB model can die quicker due to soldered SSD - weakest link in this laptop
     
  6. deadworlds macrumors 65816

    deadworlds

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    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    Citrus Heights,CA
    #6
    Do you have any links to articles talking about non-lead solder joints breaking in a few years?
    Genuinely interested.
     
  7. RobbieTT macrumors 6502

    RobbieTT

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #7
    I don't think he will find any such references to solder as it is simply not true. About the only passive component that does age are the capacitors.

    The SSD lifespan is another fallacy as the writes achieved during stress testing is well beyond any possible use scenario.

    My 2009 MBP runs better today than when new - 10 years of serious use!
     
  8. upandown macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 10, 2017
    #8
    Show proof on that.

    And no. Won’t affect it.
     
  9. _Kiki_ macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2017
    #9
    https://www.militaryaerospace.com/a...-free-solder-a-train-wreck-in-the-making.html
    https://www.indium.com/blog/militaryaerospace-lead-free-solder-reliability-still-unproven.php

    shortening, nobody cares about short life time of consumer electronics, they happy from about 5 years of lifetime

    typical denier without any knowledge and arguments :eek:
    no, because no :eek:
     
  10. upandown macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 10, 2017
    #10
  11. Queen6 macrumors 604

    Queen6

    Joined:
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    #11
    Should be no problem at all, I used to run my old 2011 15" MBP for days on end at 100% utilisation, CPU temp rarely dropped below 100C o_O:p As others have stated more likely another component will fail before the CPU or the notebook will be replaced.

    Q-6
     
  12. ilikewhey macrumors 6502a

    ilikewhey

    Joined:
    May 14, 2014
    Location:
    nyc upper east
    #12
    its not the high temp but more like the fluctuation of high temps you should be worrying about, thats why mining rigs don't break down as much as ppl think since its running 24/7. but the fluctuation between low temp and high temp are the ones that would rekt the other parts around it.
     
  13. 1rottenapple macrumors 68020

    1rottenapple

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    #13
    Soooo if you intend to hold on to your mac for 80 yrs them he should get worried. But otherwise it’s a none issue.
     
  14. Painter2002 macrumors 65816

    Painter2002

    Joined:
    May 9, 2017
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #14
    No offense here, but I wouldn’t consider either of these two articles to be reliable sources. I think the others were asking for an actual engineering/science research article or something of the sorts that shows lead-free solder degrades under heat faster than older soldering methods. I mean the first article doesn’t even use proper grammar and structure (not that my English is perfect on these forums sometimes, but I’d expect a reputable research article to be).

    Again not trying to be rude, just be mindful of your sources when reading this stuff.

    As for OP’s question, I wouldn’t worry too much about it. As others have said other components would likely fail before the CPU itself ever would from the heat alone. And even if the heat or component failure doesn’t kill the machine, I wouldn’t anticipate you keeping the machine more than 5-6 years anyways, as you likely will want (possibly need) a newer model with more oomph.

    In summary, don’t stress about it and enjoy your machine.
     
  15. deadworlds macrumors 65816

    deadworlds

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    Citrus Heights,CA
    #15
    Not to mention the first article is from 2005 and also references Zero statistical data as to the reliability of lead free vs lead solder.

    I did find on wiki that since the removal of lead from solder that there have been several solders created that mix tin with other metals to make up for the absence of lead. I tried finding actual research articles or scientific ones but found very little information.

    I had a 2008 MBP that lasted me 8 years. It was replaced simply because I wanted a 2016 MBP. I’m sure that the 2008 MBP would have continued to serve me well for several more years.
     
  16. vemac575 macrumors regular

    vemac575

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2018
    #16
    Hogwash...
     
  17. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #17
    Sorry but your facts need some backing up. So easy to come here and spew a bunch of info but harder to prove it has any validity.
     

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16 December 11, 2018