Dolphins ban Incognito for threats, racist slurs against teammate

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by AustinIllini, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #1
    The NFL Thread is starting to address this issue, but I don't believe it belongs outside of PRSI.

    I don't particularly care in what line of work you are. If your coworker leaves the type of voicemail on your phone, they should be fired. The booyahs seems so set on blaming the victim on this one. There is no excuse for this type of behavior.
     
  2. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #2
    The more I read about the Incognito/Martin case the less I like what I hear.

    Apparently its quite common in the NFL for veteran players to force rookies to pay the tab on ridiculously expensive dinners.

    I saw this sort of behavior on an episode of The Sopranos. I thought it unpleasant when gangsters did it - its even more unpleasant when NFL rookies - some of whom will only last a year or two in the league - get stuck with it.

    This sort of behavior isn't good-natured "joshing", or even a time-honored welcoming ritual. Its emotional - and financial - extortion.
     
  3. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #3
    Dolphins need to fire the entire front office and coaching staff and then waive Incongnito and anyone also who was part of these antics.

    Send a message that this type of stuff won't be put up with.
     
  4. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #4
    Support the ban.

    Feel for Incognito's family. They're going to suffer for his complete idiocy.
     
  5. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #5
    I have no problem with Incognito never playing football again.
     
  6. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #6
    That is just extortion. NFL players are highly compensated if they perform well. They can afford their own dinners. Otherwise they could simply dine in a more modest environment rather than propagate destructive behavior that they endured as rookies.
     
  7. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #7
    This is a huge league problem, not just the Dolphins. It is a thug league, and now we are learning that the Dolphin players are supporting Incognito and not Martin.
     
  8. CalWizrd Suspended

    CalWizrd

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    #8
    And you would be surprised if it came to light that there's not much difference in actions within the NBA, MLB, NHL, etc?

    I don't think I would be.
     
  9. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #9
    The problem is the NFL is the biggest league and thought of as untouchable. How many scandals have happened and nobody cares. People keep watching and the billions keep getting raked in. People give a pass to the NFL.
     
  10. CalWizrd Suspended

    CalWizrd

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    #10
    I guess every culture needs to have their own gladiators to provide entertainment.

    Where is Rollerball when we need it?
     
  11. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #11
    Wouldn't surprise me in the NBA, but I wouldn't expect to see anything this bad in MLB or the NHL. I mean it could happen anywhere, but it seems on a whole the cultures of the NBA and NFL are way different than MLB and the NHL.

    You hear almost weekly about NFL and NBA players being arrested. MLB and NHL players aren't immune to that, but it happens much less frequently.
     
  12. 63dot, Nov 8, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013

    63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #12
    You seem to be right on about the NFL and it's a sad profile of what the sport has become. I still enjoy to watch it but I can't stand many of its players and their attitudes.

    It goes back to the level of college football who starts this behavior and gets worse in the pros. What I saw with college players, the pass they got for being on the team, only reinforced such bad behavior. While I love football, and baseball, I know they are two different entities. I know baseball is a sport which borders on religion, but football is a sport that is about highly paid thugs to get paid to promote violence, or at very least a modern gladiator sport. While I love my 49ers, I don't argue against people who hate football and say it promotes violence. On a bad day, football is organized violence. Also having been a martial artist and being appalled by stuff like MMA/UFC, I do agree with their defenders when they say football is much more dangerous, especially when it comes to head injuries.

    I don't think that the sport of football itself is bad but the culture around it makes me not surprised at all when stories like the OP come out. In baseball, you get a doper and they get suspended, but in football many dope, rape girls in some cases or assault fans, and keep their job. It's not just a few bad apples, but what is tolerated. I don't think things will change anytime soon in football and the press won't get far trying to go after Incognito as the Dolphins players don't have any honor and will stand by the hazing. (All other teams, too).
     
  13. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    Michigan
    #13
    Old school hockey hazing was just as bad or worse, Pro and Junior levels say in the 70s/80s and maybe early 90s. I'd say modern day NHL hazing is pretty much non-existent. Might be a little joke played - shaving cream pie for first goal, make the rookie be the first on the ice for warm ups and no one follow him, and probably one traditional rookie dinner, but that's probably about it. The hockey culture doesn't support it anymore, but that's due to some pretty bad hazing stories getting out in the past (thinking in particular the OHL a while ago).
     
  14. FreemanW macrumors 6502

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    #14
    The more I see in the media and read in media regarding the Incognito & Martin incident, the more I am being convinced of . . . . .

    Straw, meet Camel's back.

    There are some pretty messed up opinions and rationales flying around, looking to distract and obfuscate the focus and shift the blame for what has taken place; and what has taken place is wholly unacceptable, inexcusable, and utterly indefensible.

    Not much in life is black and white, right or wrong.

    Incognito's behavior is very much black and white; he’s as wrong as wrong can get.

    He committed assault and battery, among other offenses, and very likely, much worse and it simply hasn't come out yet.

    It appears that others (players AND coaching/management) are at least complicit in these transgressions of the law, if not outright facilitators and perpetrators.

    Indefensible.

    Sure, sure, he'll get a lawyer, but his actions are indefensible.

    Those that allowed themselves to be intimidated, cow-towed, and generally manipulated by Incognito into a dysfunctional and unhealthy alliance against Jonathan Martin, to gang up on Martin and play enabling and complicit roles to the ringleader, Incognito, to participate with Incognito in the emotional, psychological and physical abuse of Martin . . . . . those individuals are weak, insecure males, and need to be culled from the human race.

    These weak individuals, the enablers and facilitators to Incognito's mental illness, are now closing ranks and making every attempt to distract focus and shift blame off of their weakness and guilt; as well as their utter lack of understanding and comprehension of what being a man involves.

    Disgusting.



    About the only thing that I see serving as a catalyst for change is not people wanting to do the right thing, but for systemic behavior and posture (which is apparently what this incident represents) costing the entity and its franchises revenue money in the form of advertising and branding recognition.

    Camel's back, meet straw.

    Buh, bye NFL, I'm done with you, your sponsors, and your franchises. You, the NFL, are dead to me.
     
  15. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #15
    Hey. I live in the real northern California.

    We must be neighbors.
     
  16. FreemanW macrumors 6502

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    #16
    Mount Shasta
     
  17. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #17
    They should be glad that Martin took the method that'll lead to litigation to solve his issues, rather than the route Aaron Hernandez took to solve his problems.

    Clean up the mess the coaches caused and be glad he is only going to rip off your lawyers arm and beat you over the head until you bleed greenbacks, rather than rip your arm off and then get nasty.
     
  18. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #18
    Hum Co.

    Peace, NoCal man.

    We is the true Scotsmen ... er ... Northern Californians.
     
  19. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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    #19
    The only thing surprising to me about this story is that it's actually news. Intimidation and humiliation has been around the NFL since forever. Jerry Kramer wrote about it during the 60's in Instant Replay. But it seems today's society is hellbent to reward more outrageous, shocking, and unexpected boorish behavior, so we get it. I guess we should just chalk it up to thermodynamics and the entropy thing?

    I generally hate professional athletics and all their selfishness. Maybe it's moved into the college ranks too. I'm decades removed from my D1 days but it wasn't that prevalent back then; then again I competed in an irrelevant fringe sport that was almost profitable for the athletic dept.

    Marin/Sonoma/Solano here and sadly never made it any farther north than Gualala. I have attended (spectator) many Scottish Highland Games in Sonoma though.
     
  20. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #20
    http://www.boston.com/sports/footba...tening-text/6s12GxCEF1vXOxA4m8eSkL/story.html

    And the story gets stranger and more ridiculous.


    Any truth to the rumor that the Miami Dolphins will be changing their name to the Miami Kindergardeners?
     
  21. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #21
    The only thing is, they all say that this is absolutely commonplace and "normal". That being the case, either there is nothing to this story, or, they will have to crack down in every locker room in the NFL.

    I don't think it is that surprising at all. These athletes are subjected to constant brain trauma, which affects many football players in mid-career, others, just post-retirement (e.g. Junior Seau), and a large and growing number of players in their 50's.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/giants/dorsett-giants-dt-marshall-diagnosed-cte-article-1.1509196

    http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootball/writer/bruce-feldman/24204896/duper-latest-exnfl-star-to-test-positive-for-signs-of-cte
     
  22. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #22
    Between this kind of thing, the bounty issue, and CTE, it's really tough to enjoy football anymore for me. And that's without even delving into the issues with college ball, and sports versus academics at all levels.
     
  23. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #23
    Up until two seasons ago, I was an avid fan of my favorite team (49ers) and played fantasy football.

    Last season I gave up fantasy football, but still watched or listened to every Niner game.

    This season I've only watched one game, and have made a conscious decision to become less emotionally involved in it.

    If I watch any sport these days, it's soccer. The real football.
     
  24. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #24
    I still like the 49ers but got more invested in baseball right when the San Francisco Giants started getting hot. It was fun though in the years leading up to it with Barry Bonds, Dusty Baker, and Tim Lincecum and it all finally came together in 2010 for the orange and black.

    By the time I get into football now, it's half over since there's no time to watch MLB season winding down to playoffs and yet catch early football months. I can catch up by NFL week 9 or 10 but am still not as into NFL these days as much as baseball.
     

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