Dongle thread for the new Macbook Pro's

jimthing

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Apr 6, 2011
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London, UK (Europe, Earth, Space)
Very similar to a OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock, except they replaced FireWire with USB 3.1 Gen 2. The OWC audio port combines headphone and microphone ports. The OWC is just missing a USB port which is strange since internally it appears to have an unused USB port in one of the two FL1100 USB host controllers.

The CalDigit has 83W of charging for the computer (same as MacBook Pro charger). The OWC only has 60W of charging.

Thunderbolt 3 docks only have four PCIe 3.0 lanes to use from the Thunderbolt 3 controller. Typically, the lanes are used for:
1) USB 3.0 controller (4 ports)
2) USB 3.0 controller (4 ports)
3) Ethernet controller
4) FireWire or USB 3.1 gen 2 controller or whatever

Audio and SD Card Reader each use a USB port. A single USB audio controller can support optical and analog input/output. The capabilities of these devices will differ between docks. For example, the CalDigit uses a faster SD Card Reader (SD 4.0 UHS-II) than the OWC (SD 3.0).

The Thunderbolt 3 controller also provides two Thunderbolt 3 ports (can be used for USB 3.1 gen 2 and display) and a DisplayPort 1.2 or HDMI 1.4 port. DisplayPort is preferable because it's easier to convert DisplayPort to HDMI (DP++ includes HDMI 1.4 so passive HDMI adapter can be used - active DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapters are not expensive compared to HDMI 2.0 to DisplayPort 1.2 adapters).

A dock could add more PCIe lanes by including a PCIe switch but that would greatly increase the price (see for example any Thunderbolt 3 PCIe expansion box with more than 1 slot - Sonnet has many examples of single slot and three slot solutions to compare).

A dock could add more USB ports by adding a hub. Does there exist USB xHCI host controllers with more than 4 ports? What USB 3.1 gen 2 controller does CalDigit use? I wonder why they didn't use a two port controller or if they did, then why didn't they use the second port?

(Edited to include other differences between OWC and CalDigit docks)
Great analysis.

The OWC unfortunately has had some terrible reports, and what with the limited power, both contributed to making many users skip buying one. While not perfect, the CalDigit has better specs overall – obviously likely as it's the latest, being released recently.

Many would love a switch type thing so they could plug one (or even two) LG 5K displays into two TB3 Macs, and easily flick between them. As the trouble with these displays is they only have the single TB3 input. (Even if you couldn't use the 3 5Gb USB-C ports on the displays back.)
Kanex used to make one for Apple's DP 27" Cinema Displays that had a single press button, to allow switching between two Macs, but never seen such a thing in the Thunderbolt display era (TB1, 2, or now 3). Hrrmpf!

Your last two paragraphs are interesting, love to hear some further (understandable) explanation/examples on those points.
 

joevt

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Jun 21, 2012
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The OWC unfortunately has had some terrible reports, and what with the limited power, both contributed to making many users skip buying one. While not perfect, the CalDigit has better specs overall – obviously likely as it's the latest, being released recently.
Seems that the only reason to get the OWC is FireWire (without comparing benchmarks, latency measurements, audio capabilities)

Many would love a switch type thing so they could plug one (or even two) LG 5K displays into two TB3 Macs, and easily flick between them. As the trouble with these displays is they only have the single TB3 input. (Even if you couldn't use the 3 5Gb USB-C ports on the displays back.)
The LG 5K display can't have two Thunderbolt 3 ports because one Thunderbolt 3 port connects to the computer, the other Thunderbolt 3 port is for one of the LG's DisplayPort 1.2 inputs and the DisplayPort output of the Thunderbolt 3 controller is for the LG's second DisplayPort 1.2 input. Two DisplayPort 1.2 inputs are required for a 5K display (just like the discontinued Dell 5K display except the LG 5K receives both DisplayPort 1.2 signals over Thunderbolt 3 from the Mac). Basically, The LG 5K is wired like a Thunderbolt 3 Dual DisplayPort adapter (but also uses PCIe tunneling for the USB functions of the display - a PCIe USB Host controller is connect to the PCIe interface of the LG's Thunderbolt 3 controller).

Your last two paragraphs are interesting, love to hear some further (understandable) explanation/examples on those points.
The Thunderbolt 3 controller has a 4 lane PCIe 3.0 interface. In a Mac, the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe interface faces upstream to one of the Mac's PCIe root ports (link width is 4 lanes). the Mac's Thunderbolt 3 controller's Thunderbolt 3 port has a downstream connection to a Thunderbolt 3 dock's Thunderbolt 3 controller's Thunderbolt 3 port.

A Thunderbolt 3 controller includes a built-in PCIe switch.

In a dock, the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe switch uses a Thunderbolt 3 port for a 4 lane upstream connection to the Mac's Thunderbolt 3 port. The PCIe switch divides the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe interface into 4 links, with width of 1 lane each. Downstream to each link is a PCIe device (USB host controller, Ethernet controller, etc.)

The Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe switch can use the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe interface as a 4 lane link to a downstream 4 lane device (such as an NVMe drive) or a 4 lane slot (as in a Thunderbolt 3 expansion box like the Sonnet Echo Express SEL or SE I)

I don't know if there exists a Thunderbolt 3 device that uses the PCIe interface of the Thunderbolt 3 controller as a two lane link to a downstream device (or two 2 lane links to two devices). However, the MacBook Pro 13 inch has one Thunderbolt 3 controller where the PCIe interface is used as a two lane link to an upstream PCIe root port of the Mac.

In a 3 slot Thunderbolt 3 expansion box, the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe switch uses the Thunderbolt 3 controller's PCIe interface as a 4 lane link to a downstream PCIe switch having multiple additional downstream links - one to each slot. The PCIe switch is usually one of the PEX 87xx variants. For example, the Sonnet Echo Express III-D (or the Sonnet Echo Express SE III) uses the PEX 8724 (PCIe 3.0, 24 lanes), configured with one 4 lane link upstream, and 3 links downstream (x8, x8, x4). The PEX 8724 can provide 6 links, so it could be used to provide 5 slots. In a Thunderbolt 3 dock it could allow for 5 PCIe devices.

Another example is the Amfeltec SQUID PCIe Gen 3 Carrier Board for 4 M.2 SSD modules. The x16 version uses a PEX 8732 PCIe switch (x16 upstream slot, x4 for each of the 4 NVMe downstream slots = 32 total lanes). The PEX 8732 can provide 8 links. The PEX 8733 has the same lane count but can provide 18 links.

So with a PCIe switch, you can add many devices (you just need space and power for them). There is a small amount of extra latency (but not as much as with the Thunderbolt 3 connection itself). The devices share the upstream link. There is a limit to the number of PCIe devices that a computer can support (each downstream link is a new PCIe bus - usually up to 128 allowed, or 256 on some computers). Each device takes I/O memory space which is also limited. A computer may reserve a number of buses and some I/O memory for each of the two Thunderbolt 3 ports of a Thunderbolt 3 controller.


As for USB, the OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock uses two Fresco Logic FL1100 4 port USB 3.0 host controllers. The CalDigit might be similar. I was asking if anyone makes a host controller that provides more than 4 ports. If not, then they could add a USB hub internally which would behave like an external USB hub.

For example, the Anker 10 Port 60W Data Hub is a 7 port external USB hub (3 ports are only for charging), but internally, it uses a 4 port hub connected to another 4 port hub meaning 4 of the ports have slightly more latency than the other 3.

So with a USB hub you can add more USB devices. USB ports of a hub have to share the USB bus.


As for USB 3.1 gen 2, one of the most common host controllers is the Asmedia ASM1142 which provides two USB 3.1 gen 2 ports using a PCIe 2.0 x2 or PCE 3.0 x1 interface (same as can be provided by the Thunderbolt 3 controller). CalDigit uses the ASM1142 in some of their PCIe cards like the FASTA-6GU3 Plus. If they use this in their Thunderbolt 3 Dock, then they could have provided two USB 3.1 gen 2 ports (but may need a larger power supply or more space?).
 

hajime

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Jul 23, 2007
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Anybody tried CalDigit TS3 Plus (2m) and the CalDigit Thunerbolt Station 2 on their MacBook Pro 2017? Which is better? I want to connect to an external Sony 4K TV@60Hz that has HDMI 2.0 port only. It seems that one has Displayport only (What Displayport to HDMI 2 adapter should I use?) and the other has HDMI port (Is it HDMI 2.0) only. I may also want to connect a eGPU to the laptop. Thanks.
 

4RunnerHeaven

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Nov 24, 2017
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Anybody tried CalDigit TS3 Plus (2m) and the CalDigit Thunerbolt Station 2 on their MacBook Pro 2017? Which is better? I want to connect to an external Sony 4K TV@60Hz that has HDMI 2.0 port only. It seems that one has Displayport only (What Displayport to HDMI 2 adapter should I use?) and the other has HDMI port (Is it HDMI 2.0) only. I may also want to connect a eGPU to the laptop. Thanks.
You would want only the TS3+ and not the TB2. I had the TS3 and it worked great with my Ultrawide which is basically 4k resolution. Use the displayport.
 
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hajime

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You would want only the TS3+ and not the TB2. I had the TS3 and it worked great with my Ultrawide which is basically 4k resolution. Use the displayport.
Thanks. My TV only has HDMI 2.0 port. In this case, should I get a DisplayPort to HDMI 2.0 adapter and then connect to the TV using a HDMI cable or get a DisplayPort to HDMI 2.0 cable? What products do you recommend?
 

joevt

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Jun 21, 2012
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Thanks. My TV only has HDMI 2.0 port. In this case, should I get a DisplayPort to HDMI 2.0 adapter and then connect to the TV using a HDMI cable or get a DisplayPort to HDMI 2.0 cable? What products do you recommend?
If a Thunderbolt or USB-C dock has a HDMI port then it's probably only HDMI 1.4. Only a Thunderbolt dock can have DisplayPort 1.2 (4K 60Hz). (A USB-C dock could support 4K 60Hz only if it only supported USB 2.0 and not USB 3.0). Therefore, either a Thunderbolt 3 dock or a Thunderbolt 2 dock should work (if it has DisplayPort).

Since the MacBook Pro 2017 supports Thunderbolt 3, then a Thunderbolt 3 dock would be better (it can support two 4K 60 Hz displays or one 5K 60Hz display - a Thunderbolt 2 dock can only support one 4K 60Hz display or two 2560x1600 60Hz displays with an additional adapter).

Since you want a Thunderbolt dock with DisplayPort, you should get a DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 active adapter, then connect a HDMI 2.0 cable to your TV. There are many DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapters. plugable.com and club3d both make one. Get a DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter for the first TV. If you connect another, then get a USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter and connect it to the second Thunderbolt 3 port of the Thunderbolt 3 dock (or a Thunderbolt 3 port of your MacBook Pro).
 
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hajime

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If a Thunderbolt or USB-C dock has a HDMI port then it's probably only HDMI 1.4. Only a Thunderbolt dock can have DisplayPort 1.2 (4K 60Hz). (A USB-C dock could support 4K 60Hz only if it only supported USB 2.0 and not USB 3.0). Therefore, either a Thunderbolt 3 dock or a Thunderbolt 2 dock should work (if it has DisplayPort).

Since the MacBook Pro 2017 supports Thunderbolt 3, then a Thunderbolt 3 dock would be better (it can support two 4K 60 Hz displays or one 5K 60Hz display - a Thunderbolt 2 dock can only support one 4K 60Hz display or two 2560x1600 60Hz displays with an additional adapter).

Since you want a Thunderbolt dock with DisplayPort, you should get a DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 active adapter, then connect a HDMI 2.0 cable to your TV. There are many DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapters. plugable.com and club3d both make one. Get a DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter for the first TV. If you connect another, then get a USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter and connect it to the second Thunderbolt 3 port of the Thunderbolt 3 dock (or a Thunderbolt 3 port of your MacBook Pro).

Thanks. At present, only plan to connect to one 49" 4K TV. Just curious, why a Displayport 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter is better than a Displayport 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 cable?

What do you think of this adapter and cable? Is the Startech cable better than the AmazonBasics cable?

https://www.startech.com/ca/AV/Displayport-Converters/dp-hdmi-2-adapter-4k~DP2HD4K60S
https://www.startech.com/Cables/Audio-Video/HDMI/premium-high-speed-hdmi-cable-2m~HDMM2MP


In case I connect one more 4K monitor in the future, which of the following do you recommend? How are they compared with each other in terms of performance and stability?

https://www.startech.com/ca/AV/usb-c-video-adapters/usb-c-hdmi-adapter~CDP2HDW
https://www.anker.com/products/variant/usb-c-to-hdmi-adapter/A8306041
http://www.caldigit.com/USB-C-Thunderbolt-3-HDMI-Adapter-Converter/

I cannot find it now but I recall watching a video about the CalDigit TS3 Plus. The reviewer mentioned not to use Apple's Thunderbolat 3 cable. Know any reason? I would prefer to have a white/pink/gold color cable connecting from the MacBook Pro 2017 to the TS3 Plus.
 
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joevt

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Thanks. At present, only plan to connect to one 49" 4K TV. Just curious, why a Displayport 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter is better than Displayport 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 cable?
A DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 cable should work. Make sure it's not a DP++ (DisplayPort dual mode) to HDMI cable because that will only get you HDMI 1.4 (passive adapters depend on DP++ to give HDMI 1.4; active adapters or cables are required for HDMI 2.0).

An adapter separate from the cable means you can choose a different length cable without having to pay for the adapter part each time; or you can replace/update the adapter without buying the cable part again.
Those all seem fine. Just read reviews, compare features and prices, and pick one. Test it, and if it doesn't do what you want, pick another (but you should learn why the first one didn't work so you can better identify one that should work). Maybe pick one from a manufacturer that shows good technical info for their product (not dumbed-down marketing crap) on their website, has good support, and has publicly accessible forums for users to communicate with each other and their support team about issues and solutions.

IF you have an HDR TV, then club3d makes a DisplayPort 1.4 to HDMI2.0b adapter. There may be other similar adapters.

(Edited to clarify cable adapter option; added HDR adapter option)
 
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hajime

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A DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 cable should work. Make sure it's not a DP++ (DisplayPort dual mode) to HDMI cable because that will only get you HDMI 1.4 (passive adapters depend on DP++ to give HDMI 1.4; active adapters or cables are required for HDMI 2.0).

An adapter separate from the cable means you can choose a different length cable without having to pay for the adapter part each time; or you can replace/update the adapter without buying the cable part again.

Those all seem fine. Just read reviews, compare features and prices, and pick one. Test it, and if it doesn't do what you want, pick another (but you should learn why the first one didn't work so you can better identify one that should work). Maybe pick one from a manufacturer that shows good technical info for their product (not dumbed-down marketing crap) on their website, has good support, and has publicly accessible forums for users to communicate with each other and their support team about issues and solutions.

IF you have an HDR TV, then club3d makes a DisplayPort 1.4 to HDMI2.0b adapter. There may be other similar adapters.

(Edited to clarify cable adapter option; added HDR adapter option)

Thanks. I think my TV has HDR. https://docs.sony.com/release//specs/XBR49X900E_mksp.pdf

What advantage does a DisportPort 1.4 to HDMI 2.0b adapter has over a DisportPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter?
 

joevt

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Jun 21, 2012
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Thanks. I think my TV has HDR. https://docs.sony.com/release//specs/XBR49X900E_mksp.pdf

What advantage does a DisportPort 1.4 to HDMI 2.0b adapter has over a DisportPort 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapter?
The MacBook Pro's Thunderbolt 3 ports don't support DisplayPort 1.4 (need to wait for Mac's with Titan Ridge Thunderbolt 3 controllers) so I don't think you can get HDR from the MacBook Pro with the club3d adapter unless you use an eGPU.

The HDR adapter supports up to 16bpc. I suppose it uses the HDR10 feature of DisplayPort 1.4 to produce a HDR signal for HDMI2.0a or HDMI2.0b.

I guess the adapter should work fine for non-HDR HDMI 2.0 stuff.
 

hajime

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Jul 23, 2007
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The MacBook Pro's Thunderbolt 3 ports don't support DisplayPort 1.4 (need to wait for Mac's with Titan Ridge Thunderbolt 3 controllers) so I don't think you can get HDR from the MacBook Pro with the club3d adapter unless you use an eGPU.

The HDR adapter supports up to 16bpc. I suppose it uses the HDR10 feature of DisplayPort 1.4 to produce a HDR signal for HDMI2.0a or HDMI2.0b.

I guess the adapter should work fine for non-HDR HDMI 2.0 stuff.

What is 16bpc? Do you think MBP 2018 will have Titan Ridge Thunderbolt 3 controlllers?
 

joevt

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What is 16bpc?
bpc = bits per component
For RGB, you usually have 8bpc for each of the red, green, and blue components.

5bpc = 15 bit color = thousands of colors (32,768 colors)
5bits for red and blue, 6 bits for green = 16 bit color = thousands of colors (65,536 colors)
8bpc = 24 bit color = millions of colors (16,777,216 colors)
10bpc = 30 bit color = billions of colors (1,073,741,824 colors)
12bpc = 36 bit color = billions of colors (68,719,476,736 colors)
14bpc = 42 bit color = trillions of colors (4,398,046,511,104 colors)
16bpc = 48 bit color = trillions of colors (281,474,976,710,656 colors)

For Y'CbCr the components are the luma component, and the blue-difference and red-difference chroma components. Chroma subsampling might be used (instead of 4:4:4, use 4:2:2 or 4:2:0) to reduce bandwidth - this means that while every pixel can have a different Y', only every 2nd pixel and/or every 2nd line can have different chroma (CbCr).

Do you think MBP 2018 will have Titan Ridge Thunderbolt 3 controlllers?
Maybe. Maybe the new Mac Pro. Maybe the new Apple Thunderbolt display to go with the new Mac Pro. Maybe the new Thunderbolt display will support the new USB-C input feature of Titan Ridge to also support computers that don't have Thunderbolt.
 

hajime

macrumors 603
Jul 23, 2007
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bpc = bits per component
For RGB, you usually have 8bpc for each of the red, green, and blue components.

5bpc = 15 bit color = thousands of colors (32,768 colors)
5bits for red and blue, 6 bits for green = 16 bit color = thousands of colors (65,536 colors)
8bpc = 24 bit color = millions of colors (16,777,216 colors)
10bpc = 30 bit color = billions of colors (1,073,741,824 colors)
12bpc = 36 bit color = billions of colors (68,719,476,736 colors)
14bpc = 42 bit color = trillions of colors (4,398,046,511,104 colors)
16bpc = 48 bit color = trillions of colors (281,474,976,710,656 colors)

For Y'CbCr the components are the luma component, and the blue-difference and red-difference chroma components. Chroma subsampling might be used (instead of 4:4:4, use 4:2:2 or 4:2:0) to reduce bandwidth - this means that while every pixel can have a different Y', only every 2nd pixel and/or every 2nd line can have different chroma (CbCr).


Maybe. Maybe the new Mac Pro. Maybe the new Apple Thunderbolt display to go with the new Mac Pro. Maybe the new Thunderbolt display will support the new USB-C input feature of Titan Ridge to also support computers that don't have Thunderbolt.
I need Chroma 4:4:4 to read sharp and clear text.
Can human eyes detect the difference between even 12bpc and 16bpc? I don't think so. So, what is good about having 16bpc? I am not sure but I think Startech the company mentioned that my Sony TV is 10 bits and even so, human eyes cannot detect noticeable difference between 10 bits and 12 bits.
 

joevt

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Jun 21, 2012
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I need Chroma 4:4:4 to read sharp and clear text.
The specs mention that 4:4:4 is possible at 4K 60Hz at 8bpc. It's unclear if they mean 3840 or 4096. They may have different bandwidth requirements. Maybe you could get 10bpc using 3840x2160 but only 8bpc using 4096x2160? Actually no, 3840x2160 60Hz 10bpc is more than HDMI 2.0's 14.4Gbps limit, even with zero length blanking periods.

I believe The club3d HDR adapter is using a MegaChips MCDP2900 as club3d appears to have copied all the same specs (I have no idea what a "dual pixel path" is and probably neither does whoever copy and pasted that in the club3d product page). The specs mention a feature where "HDR with deep color up to 12bpc at 4K 60Hz is supported through the conversion of RGB/YCbCr 4:4:4 over DP link to YCbCr 4:2:0 on the HDMI™ output with a horizontal expansion to CEA timings". It is unclear under which conditions this conversion process occurs. Knowing this is necessary if you want to be sure that you're using 4:4:4.

I don't think a full description of the MCDP2900 is publicly available - only a brief data sheet can be downloaded.

So, what is good about having 16bpc?
Not much, except when you choose 16bpc from the source, then something will happen at the output, instead of nothing.

I am not sure but I think Startech the company mentioned that my Sony TV is 10 bits
I can't find Sony documentation mentioning the 10 bit value for the panel. There's a review proving it's more than 8 bit (it's probably 10 bit) at https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/sony/x900e

Can human eyes detect the difference between even 12bpc and 16bpc? I don't think so. ... human eyes cannot detect noticeable difference between 10 bits and 12 bits.
I agree. I made a script to create a test pattern at
https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/1028700/geforce-apple-gpus/10bit-hidpi-in-10-13-1-is-orange-/
Maybe the human eye could better see the difference between two 10bpc colors that differ only by 1 if an object of a color is moving in a background of the other color?
 
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hajime

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I believe The club3d HDR adapter is using a MegaChips MCDP2900 as club3d appears to have copied all the same specs (I have no idea what a "dual pixel path" is and probably neither does whoever copy and pasted that in the club3d product page). The specs mention a feature where "HDR with deep color up to 12bpc at 4K 60Hz is supported through the conversion of RGB/YCbCr 4:4:4 over DP link to YCbCr 4:2:0 on the HDMI™ output with a horizontal expansion to CEA timings". It is unclear under which conditions this conversion process occurs. Knowing this is necessary if you want to be sure that you're using 4:4:4.
I suppose you mean: https://www.club-3d.com/en/detail/2442/displayport_1.4_to_hdmi_2.0b_hdr/

In my case, is the club3d HDR adapter better than those three adapters (startech, anker, caldigit) I listed in Thread #882?
Has anybody used club3d's products? Are they professional quality? When I heard of the name for the first time, it just sounded like a company for fun.
 

joevt

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I suppose you mean: https://www.club-3d.com/en/detail/2442/displayport_1.4_to_hdmi_2.0b_hdr/

In my case, is the club3d HDR adapter better than those three adapters (startech, anker, caldigit) I listed in Thread #882?
Has anybody used club3d's products? Are they professional quality? When I heard of the name for the first time, it just sounded like a company for fun.
Only an HDR adapter can do HDR. If you don't want HDR then any of the other adapters should work. Like I said before, you can't get HDR with your MacBook Pro without an eGPU. There may be other HDR adapters using the MCDP2900 that you can find. club3d has a good website, forums, and support; have a look around. I've bought there CAC-1070 - it's a good quality adapter. BTW, the CAC-1070 uses the Parade PS176 which does support HDMI2.0a (HDR) but a firmware update would be needed (doesn't exist) to get it working correctly (probably won't exist as they've moved on to the MCDP2900 based adapter for HDR needs).
 

hajime

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Jul 23, 2007
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Only an HDR adapter can do HDR. If you don't want HDR then any of the other adapters should work. Like I said before, you can't get HDR with your MacBook Pro without an eGPU. There may be other HDR adapters using the MCDP2900 that you can find. club3d has a good website, forums, and support; have a look around. I've bought there CAC-1070 - it's a good quality adapter. BTW, the CAC-1070 uses the Parade PS176 which does support HDMI2.0a (HDR) but a firmware update would be needed (doesn't exist) to get it working correctly (probably won't exist as they've moved on to the MCDP2900 based adapter for HDR needs).
Thanks. How do you like your eGPU system? Is it fully compatible with Ubuntu Linux, Windows 10 and Mac OS?
 

joevt

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Jun 21, 2012
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Thanks. How do you like your eGPU system? Is it fully compatible with Ubuntu Linux, Windows 10 and Mac OS?
I haven't tried eGPU before so I don't know how it will work. I have a Mac Pro 2008, a couple hackintoshes, and a MacBook Pro 2015. I could try adding an eGPU to the hackintosh or MacBook Pro (I have a Sonnet Echo Express III-D (Thunderbolt 3) which should be good enough - see eGPU.io website). It probably won't support hot plug but should work if I have it connected before startup.
 

El_JeFe

macrumors newbie
Sep 19, 2018
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Anybody got anything new since the new mbp came out? Last post here was in May and the new pro came out in july? I just picked one up yesterday and LOVE it, came from a Lenovo windows laptop. Now i need to get caught up with the USB C/ thunderbolt 3 crowd. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have a logitech Anywhere MX mouse that I like but that uses a USB A which obviously wont work anymore without some sort of dongle. ~ordered a 2 pack of usb C to A for $10 on amazon to help me get by. Also ordered the sandisk dual USB (has both usb A and C) which I thought was pretty cool.

But I have an HDMI that I use to connect to my TV, other usb flash drives that are now currently unusable... :(

Im hoping that there are some quality dongles (that dont bottleneck) that I havent found that arent $50-$120 that maybe somebody could lead me to? thanks in advance!
 

Cougarcat

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Sep 19, 2003
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Anybody got anything new since the new mbp came out? Last post here was in May and the new pro came out in july? I just picked one up yesterday and LOVE it, came from a Lenovo windows laptop. Now i need to get caught up with the USB C/ thunderbolt 3 crowd. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I have a logitech Anywhere MX mouse that I like but that uses a USB A which obviously wont work anymore without some sort of dongle. ~ordered a 2 pack of usb C to A for $10 on amazon to help me get by. Also ordered the sandisk dual USB (has both usb A and C) which I thought was pretty cool.

But I have an HDMI that I use to connect to my TV, other usb flash drives that are now currently unusable... :(

Im hoping that there are some quality dongles (that dont bottleneck) that I havent found that arent $50-$120 that maybe somebody could lead me to? thanks in advance!
It's $60, but I still like Dell's the best: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/dell-adapter-usb-c-to-hdmi-vga-ethernet-usb-30-da200/apd/470-abqn/pc-accessories. Covers all the basics –– HDMI, Ethernet, USB A, VGA –– and is still quite compact. Perfect for travel –– I love how the short flat rubber cable tucks underneath it. It's all I need (besides my Caldigit TB3 dock.)

These are my favorite reversibles because they are so tiny: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1217802-REG/sony_usm16ca1_s_16gb_usb_type_c_type.html
 

larmende

macrumors member
Nov 18, 2011
85
10
Does anyone know a good dongle/hub which transfers from USB C back to Thunderbolt 2?
I have all my time machine backup on a LaCie external drive and need that when building the new system, and Apple seems to be wanting GBP 50 for just an adapter there. And you can get hubs with lots of connections, just not TB2.
 

jimthing

macrumors 65816
Apr 6, 2011
1,454
684
London, UK (Europe, Earth, Space)
Does anyone know a good dongle/hub which transfers from USB C back to Thunderbolt 2?
I have all my time machine backup on a LaCie external drive and need that when building the new system, and Apple seems to be wanting GBP 50 for just an adapter there. And you can get hubs with lots of connections, just not TB2.
It's not "USB-C", it's Thunderbolt 3. And no, Apple's adapter is the one to buy. I have three of them.