emotional impact of an Obama loss...

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by freeny, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. freeny macrumors 68020

    freeny

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    #1
    the current global financial downturn has spread angst and a dominoing depression (emotional) across the country. Most feel this will get worse long before it will get better.

    Obama has energized and brought hope to Americas middle and lower class's in more ways then just "presidentialy". Especially to the ever growing minority population. He, in a way has brought the "American dream", where anyone can become what they've dreamt of, into more of a reality.

    If Obama comes up short on election day, what do you feel will be the country wide, emotional reaction of the populous with the double whammy of long term financial hardship and of what some will see as a setback or even death of the American dream?...

    Short term and long term...

    (sorry for the spelling and punctuation, iPhone needs spell check...)
     
  2. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    you forget that in the end the history has shown time and time again that voting in the country is going to be around 50/50 - give or take. It will not be a land slide victory. So no matter who wins 1/2 the people will be disappointed and pissed that their candidate lose. -
     
  3. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    #3
    I think people are going to be more disappointed when Obama gets elected and can't accomplish any of what he's promising...
     
  4. freeny thread starter macrumors 68020

    freeny

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    yes, but my point is that this election is unique in that there is a minority candidate. Do you think this will have an emotional impact on what is already looking like hard times ahead, especially those that will be hardest hit, minorities and the poor.
     
  5. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #5
    And yet, you conservatives still fail to ever mention what McCain would do. :rolleyes: At least with Obama, I don't think things will get worse and I actually think most people are ready for health care reform.
     
  6. freeny thread starter macrumors 68020

    freeny

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    Really, is nothing sacred to you iGary?
     
  7. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    I don't think he'd accomplish much either, but people aren't proclaiming him as the coming of the messiah, either.

    I like Obama. I think he's level-headed, intelligent and sincere. I just doubt his ability to deliver all the miracles he's promising.
     
  8. Anuba macrumors 68040

    Anuba

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    He may not be able to deliver them personally, but part of being intelligent and level-headed is to surround yourself with the right people.

    Obama has already showed judgment in that respect. He's no foreign policy veteran himself, so he brought in a VP candidate who has been the chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations for many years. Obama was perfectly aware of the fact that Hillary would have been a more popular choice, but he picked Biden anyway.

    McCain, on the other hand, picked a ditzy Miss Alaska runner-up whose only job is to win the election for him and has no real function beyond that. I've seen it before, leaders who purposely surround themselves with a bunch of weak n00bs and idiots, so that the leader will be able to act as a de-facto dictator.
     
  9. .Andy macrumors 68030

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    The messiah claim really is a terribly tired republican strawman.
     
  10. és: macrumors 6502a

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    Have you got anything to back up your statement about him not being able to do any of what he's promising?

    What 'miracles' has he promised?
     
  11. Ntombi macrumors 68030

    Ntombi

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    Seriously. The only people treating or talking about him like the messiah are conservatives. :rolleyes:

    I have no idea what the mood of the country would be like if he lost, other than complete disbelief that a republican managed to win in these times after the trouncing we as a country have taken in the last eight years.

    I know that I may be in the minority (pun intended), but his race is so far down the list as to be irrelevent in my reasons for supporting him. While I do vote in part based on issues of identity politics, I don't vote based on the race or gender of the candidate. I would be as excited as the next black person if he were elected, but that's a secondary or tertiary consideration, after getting someone back into the White House whom I believe will work hard to do things I believe are right for this country and the world, not break the fricking law, and not alienate the rest of the world while doing it.
     
  12. Legolamb macrumors 6502a

    Legolamb

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    I've felt for about a year that an Obama (or Clinton) win would be a waste for the mess that Bushco either got us into or failed to address with any redeeming authority. The Augean stables was easy compared to this, and whatever is done will only fly short term in the face of Obama, even if he is doing the right thing. He's in a lose-lose situation, and yeah, he got my vote, but sadly........
     
  13. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

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    Let's get back to the original question.

    I said a couple of weeks ago that, barring something truly way out, I just don't see Obama losing, and of course I'm even more certain of that now.

    But...if he did?

    Hard to say for sure, but I can see several things:

    • public rancor re: rigged voting, similar to what we saw in Ohio on 2004 and Florida in 2000
    • anger from minorities (although I really don't expect anything as extreme as rioting)
    • another deflated, defeated mood from the rest of us, who seem to be (alarmingly enough) resigning ourselves to the fact that the American voter is his own worst enemy.
    Incidentally, if Obama does win, he will be starting from the worst "field position" of any president since FDR. If McCain wins, he'll be starting from the same "field position" too, but I expect him to only make things worse.
     
  14. Anuba macrumors 68040

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    Yes, and then some. Those were tight races, this one looks like a landslide victory for Obama. If McCain still wins, I don't think it will stop at recounts and bickering. It won't start a civil war either, but I'm guessing there will be riots.

    Nah, I think they're still amazed that he's come this far. They half expected him to lose the primaries. I don't think they will throw some sort of collective entitlement tantrum over it.

    Well... on the other hand, you will be rid of Dubya, and that alone should help lift spirits, if only temporarily. The real trouble will come from the signal that's sent to the rest of the world if McCain wins: "Yes, it's true. The American people are blithering morons who have learned absolutely nothing from history, and who will continue to put out fire with gasoline for at least 4 more years. Yes, there's a 50/50 chance that McCain will kick the bucket Palin will take over. Yes, we will wage war on Iran. Yes, we will stay in Iraq. Yes, we will allow the national debt to continue growing exponentially, but we just don't care."

    Yeah, it's gonna be one hell of an uphill climb. This mess will take at least 8 years to sort out, but a lot of political illiterates will start complaining if it hasn't been sorted out in 8 weeks. The incumbent will have a hard time getting reelected in 2012.
     
  15. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

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    Agreed. The popular vote will be relatively close, but the electoral victory looks, at the moment, like a landslide, with the trend damn near irreversible.
     
  16. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #16

    If Sen. Obama has a sizeable lead in the polls on election day and loses... the repercussions across the USA and the world don't bear thinking about.
     
  17. g4cubed macrumors 6502a

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    I agree.
    Why is it that if you don't like Obama you're a conservative. I'm Democrat and fairly liberal and I don't like him but also don't like McCain.
    No proof yet but we'll see won't we. I've seen a lot of presidential candidates become president and not fulfill promises and he's promising middle americans a lot.
     
  18. és: macrumors 6502a

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    This is a two horse race, baby.

    Of course. I can tell you he wont do everything he says, and he'll do some things that he hasn't mentioned. However, to just dismiss everything he says he's going to do is a bit pointless.

    People need to remember that there is going to be one of two people as the president. Neither are that close to me politically, so you have to look at who will be best for the US people, the US as a country and that can lead the country and the world without starting silly wars or making the entire planet hate them.
     
  19. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    That statement is BS. Who's proclaiming anyone a messiah? You just lost huge points with me, Gary. That you're buying into that Limbaughism really shows me that you're not paying attention, or you're lazy. NO ONE THINKS OBAMA IS ANY SORT OF MESSIAH EXCEPT THE RIGHT WING. PERIOD. You should be smarter than this.

    Doesn't everyone else here as well? Have you been listening?
     
  20. g4cubed macrumors 6502a

    g4cubed

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    That's part of the problem. If someone was more qualified, not saying there is, but if there was and not in the 2 main parties then you're SOL.

    Both parties have gotten out of touch with what the people actually want and need. It's all about telling them what they want to hear then do what suits them after the fact. And at this point with the 3rd party candidates it's just not going to happen.

    Just my opinion.
     
  21. nbs2 macrumors 68030

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    There seems to be a disconnect on the term Messiah. I don't think anybody on the left expects Obama to lead the world to salvation, either in a spiritual or earthly sense.

    But, the tone of this thread, among others, indicates the value being placed in Obama by the left - there is a belief that he is the only person capable of getting us out of this mess, that he will save us from our predicament. The feeling is that there is a 100% chance Obama will fix things, 0% that McCain will.

    And that, that feeling of all hope resting in the Obama basket, indicates his messianic nature.
     
  22. Agathon macrumors 6502a

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    Obama losing would be very bad for a number of reasons.

    The first is that the rest of the world, in which the US is already deeply unpopular, would no longer in any way give the US the benefit of the doubt in anything.

    The second is that many African-Americans may well decide that no matter what they do, they will never get a fair deal in the US. It would be hard not to disagree with them. In his own way Obama is the best candidate with a hope of election for major office in any country for ages.

    If he can't get elected against the representative of a party that was responsible for the worst presidency in living memory, then African Americans are going to draw the obvious conclusion. Who among us could blame them?
     
  23. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Nope- he's our only hope of not having another Bush term. That's all it is, nothing more. McCain choosing Palin proves that he's not interested in changing anything.
     
  24. 63dot macrumors 603

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    Short term an Obama loss will do little good or bad for the economy. The US will take time to get out of this recession, regardless of who wins.

    Long term, if McCain wins and then continues the Bush path of overspending and making bad foreign policy decisions, then we are in a lot of trouble. A depression will be inevitable.
     
  25. Clive At Five macrumors 65816

    Clive At Five

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    Independent here,

    Liberal candidates have always "fed" on fear and despair. The Great Depression, WWII, the Cold War and subsequent space race, the Vietnam War, (to name a few) were all times of significant American fear. They also have the remarkable "coincidence" of Liberal presidencies. I'm not saying this is a bad thing, it just reflects that Americans want to feel more taken-care-of, which is a signature mantra of liberal ideology.

    Fear is mounting again: fear of an economic collapse, fear of Russia, fear of another cold war, fear of Iran getting hold of Nuclear weapons... our fears as a country haven't been this great for decades. Americans want to feel taken-care-of.

    Whether you agree with Obama or not (I, for the record, do not), he is the candidate making the most governmental promises to take care of the people. It doesn't matter if these promises are well-founded or achievable, they put Americans at ease, which is what they want.

    So to answer your question, yes, America will feel emotionally let down if Obama loses. A more important question to ask is whether or not it matters. Sometimes its in one's best interest to vote for something they don't personally believe in but is best for their country, i.e. legislators voting against a bail-out even though it might mean triggering a stock market crash, causing them to lose millions in personal funds. (I'm convinced that this is why the bail-out passed, BTW.)

    -Clive
     

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