Exactly what kind of iPhone improvements would require the 6-month FCC approval?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by kavika411, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. kavika411 macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2006
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    Alabama
    #1
    it is my understanding that the FCC gets a six-month lead time before a new mobile phone can be sold, hence Steve Jobs giving a six-month heads up on the first iPhone (as the FCC filings would have usurped the announcement.) So, would a simple 16 gig increase warrant another filing? 3G? New design?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Small White Car macrumors G4

    Small White Car

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    Washington DC
    #2
    Generally anything that involves sending data back and forth to something else. So 3G would, but memory changes would not.

    At least, those are the initial rules for NEW products. But, I have no idea about changes to already-approved products. Perhaps there IS something in the FCC's contract that says ANY changes mean it's a different phone?

    In other words, I spent a long time saying 'I don't know!' I guess what I'm saying is, a memory change shouldn't NEED an FCC approval, but I can't rule out the possibility that they'll want one anyway.,
     
  3. Flying Dutchman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    #3
    Been asked before

    Camera battery and memory can be changed without re approval. 3G would take FCC aproval, if major, so do redesignings.

    Next time do some searching, this has been talked about quite a few times :)
     
  4. kavika411 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    kavika411

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    Jan 8, 2006
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    Alabama
    #4
    Woops. Will do. Thanks.
     
  5. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #5
    Six months? No. That was a PR stunt to raise interest and let people run out their current phone contracts.

    You give the FCC your test results and they review and approve them. Could be very quick, but usually takes about six weeks for phones.

    For many non-cellular consumer devices (the iPod comes to mind), you can hire an approved lab, let them do all the testing in secret, then they submit the _already_ approved results and you start selling the same day.

    However, cell phones cannot be approved by outside labs, only tested.
     
  6. ert3 macrumors 6502a

    ert3

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    #6
    this leads me to wonder if perhaps the mms and possibly teathering features have been dellayed due to lack of FCC compliance. Both features are proven to work but only through work arounds and violations of the eula.

    Posibbly in the hurry to make the iPhone the first touch screen phone available apple chose to differ these features until they where approved and could be added in an update.
     
  7. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
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    #7
    MMS has nothing to do with the FCC.

    Tethering via cable is something that could do with the FCC since you're supposed to test a unit with cables attached. However, since tethering in this case would be over Bluetooth, it's not a worry.

    The iPhone is not even close to being the first touchscreen phone. There have been dozens of models before it. Perhaps the first touchscreen without any phone Send/End buttons.
     

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