Exxon CEO: Don't frack in my backyard

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Wild-Bill, Feb 22, 2014.

  1. Wild-Bill macrumors 68030

    Wild-Bill

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    #1
    I love the smell of hypocrisy in the morning......


    LINK
     
  2. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #2
    It's not hypocrisy. This affects rich people. That is very different from things that affect average or poor people. Those things are okay.
     
  3. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #3
    I hope it passes. I also hope the fracking turns the tap water in his house flammable.
     
  4. Michael Goff macrumors G3

    Michael Goff

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    #4
    Poor people having bad drinking water? Why should he care?

    He gets poor drinking water? OH HELL NO.
     
  5. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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  6. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #6
    I heard this on an NPR news bump this morning. It makes me wonder if Exxon or any of the frackers have ever saw the movie or read Dr. Seuss' The Lorax. If not, they should have it slapped upside their heads by their kids.

    Substitute trees and deforestation for fracking, the frackers and Exxon for O'Hare and the Onceler, and they could recreate the same result from the book, only for real.

    Wise man and prophet, that Seuss guy.

    BL.
     
  7. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #7
    What is it with the oilcos lately. This Exxon chief's gig is almost a tie with Chevron putting out a hundred gift certs for free pizza and soda for the locals (with a note that began Dear Neighbor, sorry we missed you...) after a fracking well exploded near Bobtown (Dunkard Township), PA. on February 11.

    http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/...e-our-fracking-fire-and-the-pizzas-on-us.html

    You just can't even make this stuff up. The workers were having a safety meeting near the wells when the explosion occurred.
     
  8. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #8

    From your link. Like you said, you can't make this **** up.

     
  9. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #9
    I'm still getting over their "sorry we missed you." Sounds like next time we'll get your house.

    That well burned for five days. Then it self-extinguished. They still have to cap it but it makes you wonder was it worth drilling anyway if after five days it wasn't producing enough to sustain the burn. They do say fracked wells don't last as long as deep drilled ones...

    Meanwhile the missing worker was of course killed, all they found was bone fragments. He was in his late 20s, left a pregnant girlfriend.

    So the costs of fossil fuels rise.
     
  10. Wild-Bill thread starter macrumors 68030

    Wild-Bill

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    #10
    Fossil fuels, GMOs, the privatization of the earth's water supply (Nestle....), unprecedented governmental corruption, corporate-run media, and the suppression of free speech, voting rights, and the unrelenting persecution of all those non-hetero.....


    Sounds like a great tourism ad.
     
  11. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #11
    I thought the oil companies made the 'cheese' for most pizzas.... :p
     
  12. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #12
    Yeah or a reason to boost the NASA budget so we can get the heck outta here when we're done wrecking the place. But with the rush to privatize space travel, as a luxury kick, maybe the 99% will not have that option either.
     
  13. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #13
    Look on the bright side, 1%'ers will need minions. :rolleyes:
     
  14. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #14
    Sure! Some of us could sign up to go as indentured servants, the way some of us managed to get to the US from England in the first place. Not all of us came for such lofty reasons as not caring for King Jame's theological views. Some of us were skipping warrants! :D

    On topic: if we can just get some of these CEOs to decide that now is the time to flip R&D into renewables, there's probably still time for our next gens to decide to leave fossil fuels in the ground. This guy from Exxon doesn't seem quite there yet... he's just a NIMBY.
     
  15. Wild-Bill thread starter macrumors 68030

    Wild-Bill

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    #15
    Oh, come on now ! Anyone who's anyone know that money is better spent on incessantly digging holes into the ground to extract oil and gas, while lining the pockets of crooked politicians to ensure said digging goes unabated. ;)
     
  16. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #16
    It's interesting what a tin ear the Exxon CEO has for the popular politics of the thing. I used to daydream about ATT (still not having brought a tower over the mountain here despite seven or eight years of talking to the FCC about their rural expansion blah blah blah) and my dream had to do with a cell tower of Verizon being erected mid-line of ATT's CEO's grand horizon from his vacation porch, and the ATT guy having to sue to stop it, with attendant howls from the locals. This Exxon dude actually stepping up and crying NIMBY NIMBY is almost as delicious.
     
  17. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #17
    He's rich. He'll just move and find a new location with a politician that can be paid off to ensure this won't happen again.

    What can Joe Bob working at the gas station for minimum wage do in the same situation?
     
  18. numlock macrumors 68000

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    #18
    he can get off his lazy ass, get educated and soon enough be a high paid worker.

    its the land of dreams where everyone gets a chance.:rolleyes:
     
  19. DakotaGuy macrumors 68040

    DakotaGuy

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    #19
    I think it's ironic that everyone posting here relies heavily on fossil fuels whether it's the plastic in your computer, the fuel that runs your car, the bus you ride, or natural gas that powers your lights, heats your home, cooks your food or heats your water, yet your all against further gas exploration.

    I guess for some of you a $500 a month natural gas bill wouldn't be a big deal, but it would be for me. I have a natural gas home with a 95% gas furnace, gas water heater, gas cooking range/oven, and a gas clothes dryer. I run all of that for about $750 a year with current gas prices and I live in a cold climate. Now I don't have a large house, but it is a 1930s home so it's not as easy to heat as a new house.

    I'm all for developing more alternative energy sources and I hope our reliance on fossil fuels can be reduced in time, but for now natural gas is an excellent, clean energy source that needs to be properly developed.
     
  20. Wild-Bill thread starter macrumors 68030

    Wild-Bill

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    #20
    The issue at hand here is not in keeping natural gas prices low. And the current fracking craze has nothing to do with natural gas for Americans. That natural gas is being shipped off to China. And, someone from South Dakota should be more than just a little concerned about these fossil fuels. The Keystone XL pipeline is supposed to run right through your state. And once that filthy, dirty tar sands oil starts flowing, it will go directly to Louisiana coast, refined, and sold to China. China gets the oil and gas, Americans get the carcinogens.

    Until someone or some people can convince the hyper-rich string pullers of the world that they can make MORE money in renewables, or until green-power lobbiests can surpass the level of money stuffed into politicians' pockets by big oil and gas, we are truly screwed. Humanity has historically shown that action is never taken until it is almost too late.
     
  21. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #21
    I don't disagree with much of your post but that last paragraph (quoted) above is problematic. It's what the oil and gas industry itself has been saying since the 1950s. Sixty years is a long damn time to watch while the industry's R&D has not come up strongly with a profitable protocol for renewables generation, storage and transmission. How hard are they trying? They may say they are interested in renewables, but it seems mainly an interest in suppressing such rollouts until they get done with the bird they have had in hand, which is oil and gas technology.

    And you're right, we all rely on it whether we like to or not. We don't all have to be passive about that reliance, however. If more of us were more activist in our desire to see more affordable energy from renewables, we'd have been there before now.

    As for natural gas being a clean energy source: really we can't afford to burn what's left in the ground. Between emissions and pollutants while the stuff is being processed, to the end point where CO2 is released during burning for cooking / heating / lighting etc., this fuel is a bad actor despite our wanting to think well it's better than coal, better than oil, better than wood or cowchips.

    It's all undesirable and unsustainable. AND YET IT'S WHAT WE RELY ON, yes.

    The worst bit of news is that the supply will actually outlast our atmosphere's ability to absorb the emissions and still support our life. There is a point at which CO2 concentration cannot be reversed. Some scientists say 350 parts per million is sustainable. We are already over 400ppm. We are not helping by allowing its emission to go unchecked, since that has follow-on or feedback loops like increased acidification of the ocean and threats to the sea life of our food chain. The thing about tipping points in complex feedback systems (like the organic chemistry of the planet!!?) is that they can come without much warning, certainly without enough time to remedy the situation.

    We are like a kid walking up a plank lying against a sawhorse. Eventually we will approach the fulcrum and then taking one more step will radically change the equations. If the kid is lucky he only loses some front teeth. The planet will not be so lucky. Because the equations of our physical environment are so complex we cannot be sure that even today we are not past the tipping point. Yet we walk up the plank.

    We have to stop lulling ourselves to sleep with the idea that gas is cleaner than coal or oil so it buys us time. Time for what? Time to get the rest of it out of the ground and sell it, if the industry has its way. I'm getting kind of old to march on Washington but I'll be buying the bus tickets for my nextgen to go, that's for sure. Every time someone organizes a speakout in DC against letting our fossil fuel industry conduct business as usual, I will be there or my nextgens will be there as long as I live. I want that industry to get real about investing its profits in profitable production of renewable energy. Ditch its marketing campaigns and put some elbow grease into someting besides lobbying Washington for the status quo.
     
  22. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #22
    We don't need it we just grew accustomed to it. Our ancestors did fine without gadgets or power for over 200 years.
     
  23. ElectronGuru macrumors 65816

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    #23
    We also get the cheap products. In a balanced world, things would be manufactured where it takes the least amount of time and energy to produce, in proximity to were they are needed. But because of artificial* differences between nations, it's become more efficient to take energy from near where the products are actually needed (all over the world), spend energy transporting the energy to a single place, then spend more energy transporting the finished goods back to the point of purchase.

    * We are so used to national differences that they feel natural. And human energy is (for now) the most expensive. But nations create and sustain the systems from which businesses choose.
     
  24. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #24
    They are not. They are riding the gravy train, thank you Washington, you know the "we can't afford it" crowd, except surprise surprise, they can afford it for corporations.

    I have a friend who works for Exxon who in so many words said that the U.S. Government should be paying for their R&D. I had to laugh at him for that. Huge record profits and these guys are the biggest slackers around, sitting on their profits, or giving it to top management, not doing what a responsible company should be doing, reinvesting in their business and not expecting the government to subsidize them.
     
  25. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #25
    Hilarious story, but, with an ugly subtext. Because the executive summary of the story is that super-rich executives have more rights than ordinary people.

    Too much hypocrisy for one day. I think I need a workout.
     

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