FAA Drone Rules


The Doctor11

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Dec 15, 2013
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Why do you think the rules are stupid?
Great question.
They kill all practical uses of drones. They all come down to you can not make any money with drones and you can't use a drone to assist you in making money. Really what kind of ******** is this. If I have a farm and I eat the whole farm myself I can use a drone to see if my plants need watering. But if I sell my crops I can't do that. How can that be explained. I can take videos and pictures with it. Why the **** can't I make money with that? I can't put a picture in a ad for a house because that would be assisting me in making money? I just don't get it. And why should I be able to see the drone to fly it? Isn't the camera on it a better view for flying anyway? I really hate these rules. They do not allow for any real use of drones. It's ********.
 
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G51989

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Feb 25, 2012
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The real issue is that there are very few laws on personal drones, so its very muddy.

For example. If the wife and I are sitting on the deck, and some drone with a camera on it starts hovering in front of our deck, but not touching the ground.

Am I in the right to shoot it down? For violating my privacy?
 

Renzatic

Suspended
Am I in the right to shoot it down? For violating my privacy?
I'd recommend hitting it with a baseball bat. You could knock it out of the sky without doing too much damage to it, then use the thing for yourself later. Free drone.

Though that scenario does make me think the FAA should regulate call signs for drones, like they do with planes. If someone's buzzing your house, you could backtrace their sign, and shoot them instead.
 

G51989

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I'd recommend hitting it with a baseball bat. You could knock it out of the sky without doing too much damage to it, then use the thing for yourself later. Free drone.
Awww, shooting it would be more fun :(

Free drone does sound cool, but I would rather go rent a Piper or Cessna ;)

Though that scenario does make me think the FAA should regulate call signs for drones, like they do with planes. If someone's buzzing your house, you could backtrace their sign, and shoot them instead.
Exactly.

The question is, should it be legal for a drone to fly on top of someones personal property?

Does the property owner have any right to shoo or shoot something down spying on him?

Or can drones go whenever they want as long as they are not physically touching buildings or the ground?
 

localoid

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I'd recommend hitting it with a baseball bat. You could knock it out of the sky without doing too much damage to it, then use the thing for yourself later. Free drone. ...
According to my friend "Sparky", building a drone jammer, that blocks the most commonly used radio frequencies utilized by a drone's remote control R/C communication link, is a relatively simple "one-evening" project for anyone adept with using a soldering iron and a Jameco catalog.
 

vrDrew

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Great question.
They kill all piratical uses of drones.
Hmmm.. Pirate Drones?!? What a great idea!

The FAA currently forbids all commercial drone usage for a very good reason: there simply hasn't been enough time for the technology and the regulatory apparatus to come together to figure out a safe way for these increasingly powerful flying machines to be operated in crowded airspace, above populated areas. And without a safe regulatory system, its only a matter of time before an improperly operated drone causes a severe incident, either by colliding with a manned aircraft, or crashing into people on the ground.

Nobody thinks that commercial drone usage will be outlawed forever. It will probably happen sometime within the next five to ten years. But only once the FAA, the FCC, and industry get together to determine what the minimum training and certification requirements for commercial operators are going to be. The limitations of how and where commercial drones may be operated. And the minimum technical requirements for different classes of drone aircraft might be.

Rather than outlaw all drones, the FAA is wisely restricting commercial use. Thus taking away the incentive for people to fly drones over crowded stadiums or housing developments. But as the technology and power of civilian drones increases, and more is learned about their capabilities and the risks involved in their operation then the FAA will put out regulations that will allow a healthy and safe commercial market to develop.

The other reason to restrict commercial drone usage is to keep the size and range of civilian operated drones relatively small. If a small, battery-operated "hobby" drone falls out of the sky on my house - it would be annoying, but unlikely to be catastrophic. But if a device the size of a Predator or Global Hawk fell on my house - it would be a tragedy. And it is only commercial civilian users that are likely to have the budget to fly such large craft.
 
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Renzatic

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Exactly.

The question is, should it be legal for a drone to fly on top of someones personal property?

Does the property owner have any right to shoo or shoot something down spying on him?

Or can drones go whenever they want as long as they are not physically touching buildings or the ground?
I guess we'll have to start considering property rights on three axes instead of two, depending on how prevalent drones become.

The subject is rife for discussion, because you can so casually violate so many people's right to privacy just by flying one around your neighborhood. Off the top of your head, the first thing you'd think of is not flying one so close to a house that you can look in their windows. And that makes sense. But that's not enough. What about people walking around in their yard? Are they giving up all right to privacy by being in the open air? What about people who sunbathe in the nude? A fence is no longer enough to keep out the peeping toms. You can see and record people doing all kinds of stuff without even trying.

And the thing is, there's no real way to stop them entirely. Even if the FAA were to outlaw private drones completely, they're not exactly difficult to make. Anyone with the will and a basic level of knowhow can go out and build one for themselves. Hell, I could probably whip together a rough one with a GoPro camera for around $700. The mechanics behind them aren't exactly complicated.

I guess we're gonna have to ask a lot of tough questions in the near future.

----------

According to my friend "Sparky", building a drone jammer, that blocks the most commonly used radio frequencies utilized by a drone's remote control R/C communication link, is a relatively simple "one-evening" project for anyone adept with using a soldering iron and a Jameco catalog.
You know, people shooting at them and/or jamming their signal are one of the reasons why I'm afraid to buy one. I'd hate to spend $1300 buying one of these, and not even get to play with it for a full day before someone knocks it out of the sky.
 

G51989

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Feb 25, 2012
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I guess we'll have to start considering property rights on three axes instead of two, depending on how prevalent drones become.
Indeed, I feel if there is a drone hovering over my deck 10 feet up, I should be able to shoot or destroy it.

The subject is rife for discussion, because you can so casually violate so many people's right to privacy just by flying one around your neighborhood. Off the top of your head, the first thing you'd think of is not flying one so close to a house that you can look in their windows. And that makes sense. But that's not enough. What about people walking around in their yard? Are they giving up all right to privacy by being in the open air? What about people who sunbathe in the nude? A fence is no longer enough to keep out the peeping toms. You can see and record people doing all kinds of stuff without even trying.
Yep, thats why I think these things are a bad idea for casual use.

If I see a drone hovering right above my yard or deck or pool, or outside my window with a clearly attached camera.

Should I be able to shoot it down?

Or because it isn't touching the ground ,the operator can do what he wants?

And the thing is, there's no real way to stop them entirely.
Sure there is



I guess we're gonna have to ask a lot of tough questions in the near future.
Indeed, the questions will be things like

Should drones be allowed to hover close to private property?

I think no

Should drones be allowed to peer into pools, hottubs and windows and film?

No.

Should I be allowed to shoot it down if it is spying on me?

yes.


You know, people shooting at them and/or jamming their signal are one of the reasons why I'm afraid to buy one. I'd hate to spend $1300 buying one of these, and not even get to play with it for a full day before someone knocks it out of the sky.
Honestly, I can see that. I am an electronics engineer. I could knock out every drone within 25 miles of my house with a low powered transmitter.

Hell, if I was motivated, I would build a jammer that takes them down JUST on my property. Then run them over with a lawnmower.
 

steve knight

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Jan 28, 2009
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drones as they are now are not stealthy they are very noisy and if you tried to spy with one it is going to be noticed. the whole paranoia is pretty silly for the most part. so far has there been even one complaint about a drone spying on nude woman?
 

localoid

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... Honestly, I can see that. I am an electronics engineer. I could knock out every drone within 25 miles of my house with a low powered transmitter.

Hell, if I was motivated, I would build a jammer that takes them down JUST on my property. Then run them over with a lawnmower.
You'd probably want to stick to just your property. Otherwise, you'd probably end up knocking out your neighbors' WiFi as well (assuming you have neighbors within a 25 miles radius), since 2.4 GHz is one the frequencies used on some inexpensive drones. ;)
 

steve knight

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You'd probably want to stick to just your property. Otherwise, you'd probably end up knocking out your neighbors' WiFi as well (assuming you have neighbors within a 25 miles radius), since 2.4 GHz is one the frequencies used on some inexpensive drones. ;)
depends on the drone some if they loose the signal they will return home using gps.
 

Renzatic

Suspended
Indeed, I feel if there is a drone hovering over my deck 10 feet up, I should be able to shoot or destroy it.

Yep, thats why I think these things are a bad idea for casual use.

If I see a drone hovering right above my yard or deck or pool, or outside my window with a clearly attached camera.

Should I be able to shoot it down?
Yeah, I guess you should be allowed to bring it down if you feel like it's violating your privacy...

...within reason. The last thing I want to see are a bunch of drunk idiots taking pot shots at any drone that happens to fly by. Drones are something that need to be both handled with, and tolerated with a bit of responsibility.

Indeed, the questions will be things like

Should drones be allowed to hover close to private property?

I think no

Should drones be allowed to peer into pools, hottubs and windows and film?

No.
No on the first, definitely no on the second. I think a 150 foot altitude minimum should be maintained over any residential districts. You wouldn't be able to pick up much detail at that height (unless they equip them with controllable zoom lenses), but still be useful for utility.

Personally, the one thing I'd want most to do with them is zoom them down little back roads, and explore hard to reach places. As long as you're not invading anyone's privacy any more than you would casually walking by, I'm alright with them.

But I do believe they're something you should have to license, and register a call sign with the FAA before you're allowed to use them. The potential for abuse is too rife to just let anyone fly them anonymously.

Honestly, I can see that. I am an electronics engineer. I could knock out every drone within 25 miles of my house with a low powered transmitter.

Hell, if I was motivated, I would build a jammer that takes them down JUST on my property. Then run them over with a lawnmower.
If it were me, I'd keep it intact, and sell it back to whoever's flying it. :p
 

localoid

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depends on the drone some if they loose the signal they will return home using gps.
I never claimed it'd crash all drones, but causing some of them to tuck tail and head home still solves the intrusion problem.

Personally, drone hacking sound like a more "sporting" activity (Arrggh! Prepare to be boarded, matey!).

Either activity, for educational purposes only, of course... ;)
 
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The Doctor11

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Dec 15, 2013
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No on the first, definitely no on the second. I think a 150 foot altitude minimum should be maintained over any residential districts. You wouldn't be able to pick up much detail at that height (unless they equip them with controllable zoom lenses), but still be useful for utility.
I really like the 150 feet over residential areas. The noise wouldn't bother people as much from there and you can't see as much. Even with a 4k camera it would be more like google earth then accualy standing there. And even if you zoomed in its going to be like a much clearer google earth.
 

Southern Dad

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May 23, 2010
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My 11-year-old daughter flies her Parrot AR Drone 2.0 all over our neighborhood. She is allowed to overfly five houses and another property she can fly over the property but not the house. She controls it with her iPhone or iPad.

Most of her flights are for fun. However, a couple months ago, neighbor knocked on our door. He had a tree fall on his property and he wanted to see his roof without having to climb up there. He doesn't own a ladder that tall. And in his own words, he's too dang old to traipse around up there if there is a better method.

Since she was paid for those two 15 minute flights over his house, it would have been illegal because she was paid, albeit a small amount. The home owner was ecstatic over the high definition video from her camera.

Some of these things are capable of flying very high and very far but there are other ones like the Parrot which are limited to the distance of the WiFi (with antennas).
 

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Huntn

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vrDrew

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Since she was paid for those two 15 minute flights over his house, it would have been illegal because she was paid, albeit a small amount.
It may have been technically contrary to FAA rules, but since your daughter isn't in the regular business of providing neighbors with this service - its doubtful the FAA is interested. Her actions were more that of one neighbor helping out another.

Now, if your daughter decides this is a good racket to get into - and invests her profits in a larger, more capable drone, and starts advertising her services - that is the sort of thing thats likely to attract FAA attention.

Over the past hundred years or so, the FAA - with the cooperation of individual aviators, airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and various State and Federal bodies, has done a simply remarkable job of creating a durable, incredibly safe system of certifying aircraft, airlines, and pilots. The FAA literally is the system the rest of the world looks to for guidance in all things to do with aeronautical regulation. It seems like a very bad idea to seriously challenge their caution when it comes to privately-operated drones.
 

rdowns

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Jul 11, 2003
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Since she was paid for those two 15 minute flights over his house, it would have been illegal because she was paid, albeit a small amount. The home owner was ecstatic over the high definition video from her camera.

So you and your daughter are law breakers, no better than scofflaws and pot smokers.

Source: you
 

Southern Dad

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May 23, 2010
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So you and your daughter are law breakers, no better than scofflaws and pot smokers.

Source: you
Actually, you are wrong. At the time that she operated her drone to make a profit, there were no laws or regulations controlling their use. Therefore, we are not lawbreakers or scofflaws.
 

Ugg

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Drones will revolutionize agriculture. I've already heard of walnut and almond farmers chomping at the bit because having a drone will save thousands in labor costs for irrigation labor alone. Instead of sending a guy on a quad into the orchard, a drone could easily spot a defective sprinkler or broken pipe. With the right kind of camera it could also spot areas that need various micronutrients or fertilizer or are getting too little or too much water.

Fields can be thousands of acres in size and be separated by miles. I'm sure that few farmers will buy their own drones, rather rent the services of professionals.
 

The Doctor11

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Drones will revolutionize agriculture. I've already heard of walnut and almond farmers chomping at the bit because having a drone will save thousands in labor costs for irrigation labor alone. Instead of sending a guy on a quad into the orchard, a drone could easily spot a defective sprinkler or broken pipe. With the right kind of camera it could also spot areas that need various micronutrients or fertilizer or are getting too little or too much water.

Fields can be thousands of acres in size and be separated by miles. I'm sure that few farmers will buy their own drones, rather rent the services of professionals.
But as of right now you can use a drone to check your crops if your selling them. That kills that whole idea.:(
 

Ugg

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But as of right now you can use a drone to check your crops if your selling them. That kills that whole idea.:(
There needs to be regulations. Where I live, rice is seeded by airplane and ag-helicopters and crop-dusters are always in the air somewhere. Adding drones to the mix could be very dangerous.