fat kids....ugh

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Keebler, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. Keebler macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
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    Canada
    #1
    Hi,

    First, let me start by saying this is not a personal attack on kids. I bet they're all great kids.

    But my lord, I went to a beach today with my kids and was floored, astounded ashamed, sad and angry and how many huge, fat kids there are. I know some kids have genetic issues, but not every one of them does i'm sure.

    It was disgusting how fat they were. There was one kid who is about my size, but i bet he had 30-40 lbs on me! Huge fat rolls on his upper back!

    I'm far from perfect, but as adults, we know the deal so it's our own dumb fault if we gain weight and stay out of shape (again, aside from genetic diseases), but for the kids, man, they don't know any better!

    As a society, we are failing our kids. And it further freaks me out when I try to fathom how kids on one side of the planet can be so disgustingly fat and we have other kids who barely get a handful to eat. Now, this isn't to say that all kids are fat, but there sure are far more fat kids today from when I was kid back in the '70s - 80s.

    Maybe i'm just getting old or maybe i'm looking for reasons to keep on my kids about eating properly, but the things I saw today, really bother me.

    I'm not expecting kids to be ripped full of muscles, but just not so darn fat and out of shape. When 1 kid was running into the water, I swear i felt tremors.

    That shouldn't happen.

    Cheers,
    Keebler
     
  2. iShater macrumors 604

    iShater

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    Aug 13, 2002
    Location:
    Chicagoland
    #2
    I blame too much time in front of the TV, consoles, and McDonald's. :cool:

    At least you saw them out doing something active! ;)
     
  3. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #3
    OK, who is responsible for the popularity of McDonalds, sodapop, games and TV?

    Multi Billions of dollars of the absolute highest-quality, highest-tech and most persuasive advertising is pummelling our children to convince then that one brand is better than the other (and G@wd forbid you go out in public with an unbranded piece of clothing on), that consumption of fast foods is not only desirable but normal, that pop and candy and pizza are staples of daily diet, that celebrity is something to admire and copy, that you are nothing if you don't have the newest, greatest, loudest, most expensive -- whatever.

    Our kids don't have a chance of developing a balanced perspective. They see it, they are force fed the marketing messages day and night.

    They model their parents and their role models' behaviours. And their role models? TV and movie characters, musicians, sports players, game characters who are all brought to you by -- the hawkers of fast food, pop, candy, pizza, games, electronics and movies.

    Our children are turning out to be EXACTLY what we have put so much energy, talent and money into making them -- consumers.


    (We got rid of our TV 20 years ago, when our kids were 10 and 5. Best thing we could have ever done)
     
  4. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #4
    A friend who's a pediatrician says he sees obese infants whose parents shove a bottle into them 24-7 to shut them up. Very sad.

    Likewise, I'm not a perfect parent either. I was feeling lazy yesterday morning and used various youtube clips to entertain/distract my toddler while I checked my email for a few minutes, for example. But using food non-stop to distract/sate a kid is pretty bad. As is feeding kids foods with little to no nutritional value. Of course, that's easy for me to say at this point. I've got a toddler who loves broccoli and green beans but refused to eat her birthday chocolate cupcake (or have it anywhere near her). No doubt in a few years she'll realize that there are junk foods she likes.
     
  5. Prof. macrumors 601

    Prof.

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    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #5
    I was at the Chicago train station about 2 weeks ago and as I was standing in line to get onto the train, a dad walked by with his son. The dad was okay in terms of weight (but still a lil more to love) and his son was behind him. His son, who was prolly 8ish, was so fat that when he walked, he waddled like a penguin. It was really sad.
     
  6. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #6
    What is truly sad and frightening is that obese kids almost always become obese adults.

    There's a cool blog called strange maps and the July 5th post is a map of the prevalence of obesity in the US. Without a doubt, the south east is the most obese while the Rocky Mountain Region and the Southwest is the least obese. Since the SE is also the poorest and least educated, it's not hard to see a link between poverty and obesity.

    I think the saddest part is that obesity is becoming so commonplace that a lot of people don't see anything wrong with it.
     
  7. Victor ch macrumors 6502a

    Victor ch

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    San José, Costa Rica
    #8
    Hey stop describing my daily routine! Actually it is (gotta love McDonalds and the PS3), but I do exercise every night and skip meals (cause I don't have time to eat) and Im what you'll consider fit. I'm 6' tall and weigh a little under 160lb.

    Having been here (US) for over 2 weeks now I must say Im shocked of the amount of obese people I've seen, and as this thread points, mainly kids. What's wrong here?

    Victor
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #9
    Can't really blame McDonald's or kids would have been fat in 1955.

    It was a restaurant trend in the US that can be seen in portion control.

    Sort of sucks I didn't record the study that shows the growth of plates ordered by restaurants over the last 30 years.

    Portion distortion that starts in restaurants and fast food, and ends at home.

    You know portion control is out of hand people actually end up taking their plates to the Maytag store to make sure they will fit in the dishwasher.

    We went from 12" plates being the norm for an individual to family platter sized plates of today.

    Give somebody a small 12" plate and they will think you are nuts.

    ---

    That and the don't waste food mentality ... pushing yourself to finish off a plate of food is like saying, "thanks I think I'll put this on my ass instead of in the trash."
     
  9. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #10
    What the hell happened to filling your plate with what you can easily finish, and being satisfied with that???

    That's how I was raised. To bad about the current crop.
     
  10. Keebler thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    #11
    i've often thought about canning the tv, but i haven't pushed that issue. I have severely limited tv usage and computer time. They're used more for rewards than anything. It's worked too - i find my kids play more games b/n themselves than anything. I had a frank discussion with my 7 year old and explained that too much 'screen time' is not good for you.

    The above is another reason why we don't have a gaming system either. If we were to ever get one, it would be the Wii. Of course, this hurts me too b/c i grew up with nintendo so I would LOVE to play some of the new awesome games out there, but I'll sacrifice that :)

    Good points about the consumers CRam. So very true.
     
  11. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    Aug 16, 2007
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    Toronteazy
    #12
    I don't know if it's so much about limiting exposure to unhealthy habits as it is establishing healthy habits. While I don't have cable or watch TV per se, I do watch a lot of TV shows and movies on DvD, have some gaming systems, have a sedentary job, and spend an awful lot of time in front of the computer. My physical fitness by most measures (fitness test, BMI, body fat percentage and resting heart rate) is on or approaching that of an amateur level athlete, because I have established healthy eating and exercising habits.

    I can't suppose if this in any way applies to raising children as that's an exercise competely foreign to me, but that's what works for me as an adult.
     
  12. Leareth macrumors 68000

    Leareth

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    Nov 11, 2004
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #13
    It seems that the kids today are going to extremes: one side the fat kids, and on the other the starving sticks.

    When i went to my uni today I was looking at the people around me and that was basically the two types I saw. then like a mirage,a group of people in front of me, normal looking, fit, in practical comfortable clothing for school, then I checked again, those were the Olympic's bound athletes. grr.

    It is rather sad though to see the overweight 12 year old and under kids... really it not that hard to go play outside, run around ,climb trees etc.
     
  13. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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  14. ktbubster macrumors 6502a

    ktbubster

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    Jan 20, 2007
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    US
    #15
    Spent the last 2+ years working with my boss on this book. Learned a lot about eating habits and diet balances and such. He is 93 and a emeritus professor still working (obviously) on research and such, and swims every day for exercise. His wife is the same age and all his kids have kids. I trust him, that and he has been in the industry for 70 years... :)

    "Cholesterol Won't Kill You, But Trans Fat Could"

    http://www.trafford.com/07-1517

    All this fat kid talk got me thinking about that.
     
  15. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #16
    Well, this started a long time ago. It's indicative of the laziness and selfishness of American culture. I'm shooting a segment for 20/20 Thursday with my aunt who tried a fad diet two years ago. Of course it failed and now they're doing the follow-up show. People in my family do this crap all the time. Then they ask me what my "secret" is. :rolleyes: I'm just say, DUH! Get off your butt and move! But they don't want to do that. :rolleyes:

    EDIT- well, it appears that I now won't be doing the 20/20 segment. The producers changed their minds and want to do something different.
     
  16. Keebler thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
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    Canada
    #17
    actually, that's a good point iscariot and i guess, the exact same reasons why I haven't sent the tv packing. many of the points you mentioned, I do (except the job b/c i stay at home with my kids).

    You're right - it's education and lifestyle which is the point to bring to kids.
     
  17. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago, Illinois
    #18
    Let's also face the fact that a lot of folks are ill-equipped to raise kids. I think you should have to have a license to raise kids, or at least have to take a parenting class.
     
  18. MrSmith macrumors 68040

    MrSmith

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    Nov 27, 2003
    #19
    I think video games should take a large part of the blame.
     
  19. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #20
    It's not just American culture, though... it's almost every industrialized or industrializing nation. Even perennially thin Japan is fighting rising obesity.

    I think exercise and activity levels are very important. People should exercise more. But the industrialization of food, I believe, is a much bigger culprit. As mentioned several times above, too much of the available food is too low in (micro) nutritive value, and yes, it comes packaged in too too large portions. It doesn't make any sense for most of the population to exercise harder and harder to compensate for unhealthy food options. And while a small portion of the population can successfully resist bombardment with unhealthy food options (and some of us can resist it altogether too well... :rolleyes: ), it's arrogant of us to expect that most of the population can be locked in a room with thousands of calories of non-nutritive food and be expected to not eat it. And yet that's exactly the kind of civilization we've built.
     
  20. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #21
    I just did a paediatrics placement and the paediatrician was adamant that parents should never force feed any kid (even healthy foods). Even those kids who were on the lower end of the percentage tables, he made it clear that he considered the best evidence pointed towards not increasing their dietary intake above what they were willing to eat themselves (unless of course their weight was dropping at an increasing rate due to illness).

    His reasoning was that research is showing that the you're not leaving the table until you eat everything on the plate attitude leads to a loss of the normal dietary self-regulation and satiety, which in turn leads to excess eating when the child is older. So a lot of the problems people are experiencing with weight might arise from problems set up as a toddler, by parents actually thinking they were doing the right thing.

    I've not read the research myself but this seemed an interesting and biologically plausible approach. But then again professional opinion is the lowest form of evidence so take this with a grain of salt (!) unless you appraise the research yourself.
     
  21. OscarTheGrouch macrumors 6502

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    Feb 28, 2007
    Location:
    G' Vegas South Carolina
    #22
    How is an inanimate object to blame??:confused:
     
  22. OscarTheGrouch macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Location:
    G' Vegas South Carolina
    #23
    I agree with this 200%. I remember I worked at Spencer Gifts for a brief time while in College.

    This family came in- quite obviously not well off- and they had 4 kids, including 2 in a stroller. Their purchases included adult themed games and accessories.

    1. i would not be purchasing these things in the presence of my children

    2. have you not figured out what causes them yet?
     
  23. MrSmith macrumors 68040

    MrSmith

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    Nov 27, 2003
    #24
    Time spent mouth agape in front of the TV screen instead of playing ball in the yard.
     
  24. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #25
    Sounds like a parent that's letting the inmate(s) run the asylum.


    Lethal

    EDIT:
    I hope there's more frustration and hyperbole in this post than seriousness 'cause having the government determine who can procreate and who cannot is pretty disturbing, IMO. A private company (Baby's R' Us or something) offering $XYZ in in-store credit if you take a parenting class or something is one thing, but saying you believe government should decide who gets to have kids is quite another.


    Lethal
     

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