FBI prepares vast database of biometrics

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by FJ218700, Dec 22, 2007.

  1. FJ218700 macrumors 68000

    FJ218700

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    #1
  2. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #2
    Blowing more of our tax payer money it seems, I wonder what this does to identify 10- 20 million illegals we have in this country? Same old federal govt pissing away money and allways trying to create a police state.
     
  3. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #3
    And how exactly would they go about getting these eye balls into the system.
     
  4. FJ218700 thread starter macrumors 68000

    FJ218700

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    #4
    for one, the article mentions that voluntary iris scans would allow people to access to shorter airport security lines,

    no thanks
     
  5. UltraNEO* macrumors 601

    UltraNEO*

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    #5
    Sorry, my Bio-metric details are my property. No other fooker, no matter how big the organisation, or how superior they appear, has has the right to enlist anything about me on their system. If that means I never re-enter the US for a vacation, so be it.

    Bottom line, it's a invasion of my personal privacy.
     
  6. thomahawk macrumors 6502a

    thomahawk

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    #6
    haha, yes my eyeballs are mine and nobody can have them!!! >.> <.<
     
  7. Big-TDI-Guy macrumors 68030

    Big-TDI-Guy

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    #7
    Who here has been to the eye doctor?

    Well - odds are good they have a copy - and if the gov't is 1/4 as smaht as I am, they know where to go shopping for that info...

    I have my iris and retinal maps. Ready for the ironic part? The Dr. refused to give me a copy due to "security concerns" - then he stepped out for 2 minutes, and I retrieved my copy from an unlocked PC in the waiting area.

    Yes, I'm serious. :mad:
     
  8. MasterNile macrumors 65816

    MasterNile

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    #8
    Are you sure? You can get some decent cash for them on the black market... especially from the people that are trying to trick the FBI's biometric database :p
     
  9. Schtumple macrumors 601

    Schtumple

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  10. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    Pros and cons with this.

    Will be interesting to see how it develops.
     
  11. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    I see it as a good thing if only people who are arrested are entered into the system and not just your average law abiding citizen.

    You'd be amazed at how disorganized things like DNA information is in the country, sometimes states can't even give information for evidence to others because they dont have a way.

    That being said, I expect this to be abused 100%.
     
  12. Peace macrumors P6

    Peace

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    #12
    If you've ever been in the US military like I have the government already has all the info on you it needs.;)
     
  13. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #13
    Very true.
     
  14. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #14
    That is of course the rationale used to defend any government aggregation of private information.

    Sure it's nice when the government listens in on terrorist phone conversations, but we'd prefer it if they didn't do that for law abiding citizens.

    The problem is, who do we trust to make such a decision? The entity we're asking to carry it out? No? Then no one should have such power.

    The personal information being collected is sensitive enough that if it were to be leaked, thousands of citizens' privacy would be at stake. That alone is enough to shut down the program before it begins.
     
  15. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #15
    I guess I just have a very different way of thinking about these things. I grew up around law enforcement, maybe that's why, I don't know, but stuff like this doesn't bother me. Want my eyeball information? Ok, go for it. If you want my fingerprints, to record my gait, my face shape, etc., then whatever.
     
  16. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #16
    I think you missed when I said only those who get arrested (actually, id prefer convicted) should be entered.

    Otherwise, stay the hell away from my bio lol
     
  17. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #17
    Once again though, this opens up problems.

    Do we collect the information for petty theft?

    Public drunkenness?

    This is quite simply a government turning on its people. No one should have this information precisely because it is too dangerous, even if the information is only from criminals.
     
  18. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

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    #18
    Even criminals have the right to privacy. After all once they have done their time they have paid their debt to society and should be treated just like anyone else.

    If the time they did is not considered enough then the justice system needs reform.
     

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