First batch of iPhone 5 were practice?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by richmds, Oct 17, 2012.

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  1. richmds macrumors regular

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    #1
  2. cababah macrumors 68000

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    #2
    You can say that for almost any new product design. There are always lessons learned during manufacturing and over time quality and efficiency will go up as they refine the process. This is why some people always avoid being an early adopter for anything until the kinks get worked out.
     
  3. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    ANYTHING you buy this adage is true for though. As companies produce the same item over and over again, they get better at assembly, find ways to stream line the manufacturing processing, and overall QC gets better. This is true for phones, cars, furniture, etc.....

    If you don't want to be part of the "practice" runs of anything you buy, then don't buy in the first batch. Wait 6 months....
     
  4. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

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    It's a two way street. Some might say that because it's a new device, unfamiliar to the assembly workers, that the first ones passed QC might actually be better. Slower assembly time, new product and components etc. So perhaps more care was taken with the first "batch".


    I have one of the first off Foxconns production line, and it's perfect..No scuffing, great screen etc. As time goes on, and the staff become more familiar with the assembly process, it is possible that a tendency to become more blasé about putting them together could creep in.

    It's also possible that with QC's placing more pressure on the workforce that more errors and marks etc. occur.

    I guess I'm lucky, as I have never yet had to return a phone, iPad or Mac, and I am fussy....We pay top $ for our products and therefore not unreasonably expect them to be perfect. Working on a Foxconn assembly line for very little money can't be a bundle of fun.
     
  5. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    I call BS. Why do you need to practice not to put obvious nicks and scuffs on the exterior of the iPhone? As not all iPhone 5 are defective, they've clearly allowed those predamaged iPhones (normally caught during QC) to make their way into retail in order to meet the higher demand under a time gun, at least until Apple cracked down on them. Demand was never as high as for the 4/4S.

    Foxconn most likely also rushed the training (especially on newly hired workers) in order to meet the higher demand.
     
  6. jf1450 macrumors regular

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  7. darngooddesign macrumors G3

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    #7
    Yes the first batch made before the retail-ready batches were practice.
     
  8. PAC88 macrumors 6502

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    not every phone was affected during the first weeks.. maybe like 1-3%(give or take) of all the iPhone's slipped through QC that shouldn't have..

    The "issues" (if you can call them that) have been so overblown and it all started with Maps.. which has since proven to be very accurate for 99.5% of people

    I've criticized Apple plenty of times.. but now that I actually have the iPhone 5 and used it extensively.. I can honestly say the issues are in fact non-existent for the vast majority of users.
     
  9. tbone00011 macrumors newbie

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    The iPhone 5 is worthless anyways, better to stick with the 4
     
  10. darngooddesign macrumors G3

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    #10
    Mine is worthwhile.
     
  11. Ramio macrumors 6502a

    Ramio

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    #11
    Ha?!..what cave did you come out from?
     
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