For anyone who wants to use Logic and wonder what Mac they should get

Jardins de Vin

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 6, 2012
917
25
European Union
No iMac Pro listed? I imagine that’ll spank the 2013 Mac Pro.
I wonder that too. But it looks like no one has submitted one yet. Actually, even if you look at the iMacs from the past years, you can see how quickly they caught up with the classic MPs and even some newer MPs.
 
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keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,537
25,261
I wonder that too. But it looks like no one has submitted one yet. Actually, even if you look at the iMacs from the past years, you can see how quickly they caught up with the classic MPs and even some newer MPs.
Ah, no MacBook Pro past 2015 listed either :(

The new ones would be really good as LPX uses Metal and the dGPUs will eat that up.

Unfortunately the list seems a little outdated - do you know if there's a more recent one? Seems really unusual that nobody with a 2016 or high MBP would have submitted their scores...
 
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Jardins de Vin

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 6, 2012
917
25
European Union
Ah, no MacBook Pro past 2015 listed either :(

The new ones would be really good as LPX uses Metal and the dGPUs will eat that up.

Unfortunately the list seems a little outdated - do you know if there's a more recent one?
I think this is the most recent one but it’s based on user submission, so it looks like not everything’s covered. I submitted mine yesterday :) (MP 12-core 2,93)
 
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Kevbasscat

macrumors 6502
Oct 10, 2016
254
176
Banning, CA 92220
I haven’t, what does it say? Do I owe millions to someone? :eek:
Lol, I hope not. They list the term "cookies" as anything they want, including running scripts on our devises. and allowing any third party access to all your data. They're basically giving themselves unrestricted access to whatever they desire. Snapchat is much like that also, allowing themselves permission to use anything you post. including pics and vids. Imagine those Snapchat trollops discovering their private content is now public. Oopsa). These companies redefine cookies" to mean whatever they want.
 
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LogicBenchmarks.com

macrumors newbie
Jul 3, 2019
3
3
@ LogicBenchmarks.com
I haven’t, what does it say? Do I owe millions to someone? :eek:
You certainly don't, at least not to me. :)

Lol, I hope not. They list the term "cookies" as anything they want, including running scripts on our devises. and allowing any third party access to all your data. They're basically giving themselves unrestricted access to whatever they desire. Snapchat is much like that also, allowing themselves permission to use anything you post. including pics and vids. Imagine those Snapchat trollops discovering their private content is now public. Oopsa). These companies redefine cookies" to mean whatever they want.
Hi Kevbasscat, what's wrong with the cookies on my site? I actually put a lot of effort into making the site EU-Law compliant, which required reading a lot of laws that aren't easy to understand. I want everything to be done in a clean and proper way. While I was adapting the site to the new policies that were made to protect people's privacy and data (which I support) I dug deeper and deeper into all this subject and noticed that most sites actually handle all of that the 'un-proper' way:

A lot of sites will have a window popping up, telling you about the cookies, but technically it does exactly nothing, it's just a popup. The correct way is that the cookies should not be loaded before the person has accepted or not accepted the cookies to be placed on their device. The popup is therefore just the front of what has to technically happen in the back. Since I'm not a technician and don't know how to program that myself, I looked for a software that could do that, and you won't believe it, but I have found only a single (!) plugin on the entire market that can actually do that the correct, proper and legal way and that plugin is installed on my site as we speak.

When the visitors enter the site, they are asked if they would like to accept all cookies or only those that are needed to run the site. In our case, this doesn't make much difference, because there isn't much stuff on the site that actually places cookies. The site is very simple and basic. Most of the time, accepting only the functional cookies will turn off cookies for ads. As you can see, my site doesn't have ads (although I admit I have thought about placing a few subtle, but clearly labeled as such ads, to finance running the site, which in the end is a lot of unpaid work), so the site is unaffected by that.

The privacy policy tells at what moment cookies are being used, and that is when you post stuff, when you register, also when you vote on a poll (to avoid people voting several times), etc. The site can technically not work without these. IP addresses are anonymized, so we don't know who is who.

If you found that something was done the un-proper way, please be as precise as you can in describing it, as I would really like to have the site as clean as possible and I am sure it's not perfect, but I am always looking to make it better. :) It's fun working on it, I am enjoying it. So like I said, if you find something is not done correctly, especially when it comes to Privacy Policy which is a very sensitive subject, please don't spare on critics, just shoot them at me :D And be precise, because I'm not a pro, this is just a fan-site.


All the best guys,
LogicBenchmarks.com
 
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Kevbasscat

macrumors 6502
Oct 10, 2016
254
176
Banning, CA 92220
You certainly don't, at least not to me. :)



Hi Kevbasscat, what's wrong with the cookies on my site? I actually put a lot of effort into making the site EU-Law compliant, which required reading a lot of laws that aren't easy to understand. I want everything to be done in a clean and proper way. While I was adapting the site to the new policies that were made to protect people's privacy and data (which I support) I dug deeper and deeper into all this subject and noticed that most sites actually handle all of that the 'un-proper' way:

A lot of sites will have a window popping up, telling you about the cookies, but technically it does exactly nothing, it's just a popup. The correct way is that the cookies should not be loaded before the person has accepted or not accepted the cookies to be placed on their device. The popup is therefore just the front of what has to technically happen in the back. Since I'm not a technician and don't know how to program that myself, I looked for a software that could do that, and you won't believe it, but I have found only a single (!) plugin on the entire market that can actually do that the correct, proper and legal way and that plugin is installed on my site as we speak.

When the visitors enter the site, they are asked if they would like to accept all cookies or only those that are needed to run the site. In our case, this doesn't make much difference, because there isn't much stuff on the site that actually places cookies. The site is very simple and basic. Most of the time, accepting only the functional cookies will turn off cookies for ads. As you can see, my site doesn't have ads (although I admit I have thought about placing a few subtle, but clearly labeled as such ads, to finance running the site, which in the end is a lot of unpaid work), so the site is unaffected by that.

The privacy policy tells at what moment cookies are being used, and that is when you post stuff, when you register, also when you vote on a poll (to avoid people voting several times), etc. The site can technically not work without these. IP addresses are anonymized, so we don't know who is who.

If you found that something was done the un-proper way, please be as precise as you can in describing it, as I would really like to have the site as clean as possible and I am sure it's not perfect, but I am always looking to make it better. :) It's fun working on it, I am enjoying it. So like I said, if you find something is not done correctly, especially when it comes to Privacy Policy which is a very sensitive subject, please don't spare on critics, just shoot them at me :D And be precise, because I'm not a pro, this is just a fan-site.


All the best guys,
LogicBenchmarks.com
Maybe I'm the ignorant one, idk. I couldn't even read anything without having to agree to your terms. I always have issues with sites that won't allow me to even know if I'm on the right webpage or not first before allowing cookies. As I read your agreement, it defines cookies as pretty much anything you want it to be. The wording actually scared me, as it allows you to put scripts on my computer, and allow all third parties access. That doesn't sound like you're protecting my privacy, it sounds like you're opening me up for invasion thereof. I'm not an expert on cookies, but I can say, wording such as yours puts fear in this user, not a feeling of safety. Just the fact that I have to agree before I can even read anything about your site, causes paranoia. If you're shoving it down our throats with the only escape being closing your page, that certainly doesn't bode well for user confidence. Give us the benefit first please? it just seems that any site can create their own set of rules and people just allow without questioning. I question everything. Because privacy is my basic human right. It is MY privacy, not yours, and that doesn't get respected unless I demand it, and personally protect it. For instance read snapchat's privacy policy. That will wake you up:), lol.
 
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LogicBenchmarks.com

macrumors newbie
Jul 3, 2019
3
3
@ LogicBenchmarks.com
Maybe I'm the ignorant one, idk. I couldn't even read anything without having to agree to your terms. I always have issues with sites that won't allow me to even know if I'm on the right webpage or not first before allowing cookies. As I read your agreement, it defines cookies as pretty much anything you want it to be. The wording actually scared me, as it allows you to put scripts on my computer, and allow all third parties access. That doesn't sound like you're protecting my privacy, it sounds like you're opening me up for invasion thereof. I'm not an expert on cookies, but I can say, wording such as yours puts fear in this user, not a feeling of safety. Just the fact that I have to agree before I can even read anything about your site, causes paranoia. If you're shoving it down our throats with the only escape being closing your page, that certainly doesn't bode well for user confidence. Give us the benefit first please? it just seems that any site can create their own set of rules and people just allow without questioning. I question everything. Because privacy is my basic human right. It is MY privacy, not yours, and that doesn't get respected unless I demand it, and personally protect it. For instance read snapchat's privacy policy. That will wake you up:), lol.
Thanks for the feedback. :) Actually the reason why I have this pop-up is because there's a EU regulation that requires that. You guys don't have this in America, but everyone who surfs the web in Europe knows this well as all sites are required to have this. The idea behind it was to inform users in the first place that there might be information that is collected.

Since it is technically not possible that a website collects no information at all (it wouldn't be possible to use it) we need it to display that, and I think it's a good thing because it raises awareness for it. Imagine a website being like somebody's private ground. As soon as you access it, whoever owns the place knows who visits it. This means all web pages, for example, collect IP addresses: it's technically not even possible for them to not collect them. So what we have to do is anonymize IP addresses, which is what I do as well. This way I can not track any people.

As for having to agree to the terms before using it, it's not entirely true: It asks you if you want to allow all cookies or only the cookies that are technically needed for the website to run and without which it wouldn't be possible to even open the site. On my site, it doesn't make a difference because I don't have any ads, but on most pages selecting the "technically required cookies only" will usually deactivate all cookies for ads. Like I said, here in Europe we have these pop-ups opening up for every web page and I always deselect everything and leave the technically required cookies only. That pop-up also has a link to the Privacy Policy where I tried to make everything transparent.

When you say the wording scares you, do you mean the wording on the Privacy Policy page? What can I do for it not to scare you? Since English isn't my first language my vocabulary and abilty to express myself in this language aren't always the best, and I do notice that sometimes I don't manage to express the things I wanted to say as precisely as I would want to.

I have thought about what I can improve, and I will make a list of all the cookies that the site needs to run and I will put them up in the Privacy Policy. If you have any other suggestions, please keep them coming! But did I get it right that it is mainly the pop-up that irritates you?

PS: I'm very glad you care about this. There's much more awareness for this subject in Europe than there is in America and I hope you'll spread it over there! As you said, it's your privacy and nobody else's.

PPS: I'm not even a company like you stated before, I am just a private person running this site for fun. :) I am not making any money from it.
 
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Kevbasscat

macrumors 6502
Oct 10, 2016
254
176
Banning, CA 92220
Thanks for the feedback. :) Actually the reason why I have this pop-up is because there's a EU regulation that requires that. You guys don't have this in America, but everyone who surfs the web in Europe knows this well as all sites are required to have this. The idea behind it was to inform users in the first place that there might be information that is collected.

Since it is technically not possible that a website collects no information at all (it wouldn't be possible to use it) we need it to display that, and I think it's a good thing because it raises awareness for it. Imagine a website being like somebody's private ground. As soon as you access it, whoever owns the place knows who visits it. This means all web pages, for example, collect IP addresses: it's technically not even possible for them to not collect them. So what we have to do is anonymize IP addresses, which is what I do as well. This way I can not track any people.

As for having to agree to the terms before using it, it's not entirely true: It asks you if you want to allow all cookies or only the cookies that are technically needed for the website to run and without which it wouldn't be possible to even open the site. On my site, it doesn't make a difference because I don't have any ads, but on most pages selecting the "technically required cookies only" will usually deactivate all cookies for ads. Like I said, here in Europe we have these pop-ups opening up for every web page and I always deselect everything and leave the technically required cookies only. That pop-up also has a link to the Privacy Policy where I tried to make everything transparent.

When you say the wording scares you, do you mean the wording on the Privacy Policy page? What can I do for it not to scare you? Since English isn't my first language my vocabulary and abilty to express myself in this language aren't always the best, and I do notice that sometimes I don't manage to express the things I wanted to say as precisely as I would want to.

I have thought about what I can improve, and I will make a list of all the cookies that the site needs to run and I will put them up in the Privacy Policy. If you have any other suggestions, please keep them coming! But did I get it right that it is mainly the pop-up that irritates you?

PS: I'm very glad you care about this. There's much more awareness for this subject in Europe than there is in America and I hope you'll spread it over there! As you said, it's your privacy and nobody else's.

PPS: I'm not even a company like you stated before, I am just a private person running this site for fun. :) I am not making any money from it.
Thank you for reaching out and being transparent. That means a great deal, and creates a good trust. I was not aware of the EU law requiring such disclosure. Truthfully, I haven't been as keen on privacy as I am now, due to Facebook and others intrusive measures. Yours is the first I've seen with such transparency about what cookies actually mean, I mean the scope thereof. Please forgive me for not understanding completely the requirement of the EU. As for recommending changes in verbiage, that will need to wait, as I'm ill right now and will be some time before I'll be able to. I'll be fine, I just need time.

I would like to retract my warning about your site's privacy policy, and apologize for misunderstanding it's intent. My bad. It's difficult nowadays to keep up with all the laws and rules. I acted with paranoia, not good judgment, and for that I apologize.
Thank you,
Kevin
 
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LogicBenchmarks.com

macrumors newbie
Jul 3, 2019
3
3
@ LogicBenchmarks.com
Thank you for reaching out and being transparent. That means a great deal, and creates a good trust. I was not aware of the EU law requiring such disclosure. Truthfully, I haven't been as keen on privacy as I am now, due to Facebook and others intrusive measures. Yours is the first I've seen with such transparency about what cookies actually mean, I mean the scope thereof. Please forgive me for not understanding completely the requirement of the EU. As for recommending changes in verbiage, that will need to wait, as I'm ill right now and will be some time before I'll be able to. I'll be fine, I just need time.

I would like to retract my warning about your site's privacy policy, and apologize for misunderstanding it's intent. My bad. It's difficult nowadays to keep up with all the laws and rules. I acted with paranoia, not good judgment, and for that I apologize.
Thank you,
Kevin
No worries Kevin, you didn't do anything wrong. It's important to be critical in this world of fake news and I believe it's always better questioning things than not questioning them. You, therefore, shouldn't apologize. Not questioning things will lead us into dictatures, back in the time when one person used to decide for everyone else and us people didn't have anything to say.

I hope you get better soon!
 
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