Full body transplant

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Meister, May 22, 2015.

  1. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #1
    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/sergio-can...rtality-change-story-humanity-forever-1502526

     
  2. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #2
    Brains don't wear out (they do)... and what about those old ugly heads?? Lol. :rolleyes:
     
  3. mrkramer macrumors 603

    mrkramer

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    #3
    And even if they don't then who will supply all of the bodies to put them on if it actually works as he says and people can just keep replacing their old worn out body to keep going. Someone still has to die to provide the donor body.
     
  4. WestonHarvey1 macrumors 68020

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    #4
    I agree its a "body transplant" not a "head transplant".
     
  5. Bug-Creator macrumors 6502

    Bug-Creator

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    #5
  6. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

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    #6
    Once this becomes more mainstream, those 'my body is ready' posts will gain some much needed depth.
     
  7. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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  8. A.Goldberg, May 23, 2015
    Last edited: May 23, 2015

    A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #8
    As someone who works in medicine, I be very surprised if this is successful, let alone "perfected" in the short amount of time this doctor is predicting. I just think there would be so many issues with regulation of vital organs for this to possibly work, not to mention the neuronal healing issues mentioned in the video. I seriously question what the quality of life would be for a transplant recipient too.

    I'm wondering how practical surgery even is. I can only think of a few cases where it would be practical to replace the entire body rather than just the individual failed organs, limbs, etc.

    I don't think is anywhere near the next step of immortality. I find it hard to believe you could extend a life 40 years, but who knows. Furthermore, everyone dies, but not everyone dies young with a healthy body. How do you choose who deserves the body? If this surgery is truly world changing, I would think it would have to be available to the super wealthy.

    Does he any animal models to prove the viability of this.

    I'm surprised Brigham and Womens hospital isn't on the forefront of this. They're the leading experts in organ transplants and bizarre Frankenstein experiments. I used to work right down the street from them and see some crazy things walking in and out of their campus.
     
  9. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #9
    Personally I think they should spend more time trying to download the brain.
     
  10. Meister thread starter Suspended

    Meister

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    #10
    I think this is a common misconception. "The brain" is not all there is to our consciousness. In fact, the entire body with its 70k nerve highways is a somewhat extended part of the brain. I have doubts that it would be possible or even desirable to duplicate the brain to preserve an individual.

    ----------

    I remember that a long time ago they did transplant the head of a monkey onto another monkey. It didn't last long of course but it should theoretically be possible.

    In any case, even if the surgery fails, they will collect significant data for future surgeries, especially in the nerve merging department.
     
  11. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #11
    I'm admittedly no expert on the human nervous system, but last I checked we haven't even figured out how to fix severe spinal cord injuries. So how can it be possible for us, with our current knowledge and technology, to connect a brain to an entirely new body?
     
  12. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #12
    First of all, medical science needs to start small and finish big by perfecting the penis transplant.
     
  13. Wahlstrm macrumors 6502a

    Wahlstrm

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  14. Meister thread starter Suspended

    Meister

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    #14
    No. Please, no! :mad:
     
  15. McGiord macrumors 601

    McGiord

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    #15
    How to re-connect all the nerves the right way is the main difficulty that a procedure like this will have to overcome.

    There are other proposed ways to extend life:
    - DNA reprogramming of existing cells
    - nanorobots to repair cells
    - Manufacturing or cloning of organs to transplant them as spare parts
     
  16. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #16
    And when that's done, take the next logical step. Because why stop at just one, right?

    ----------

    As far as I know, being able to graft nerves together without any scar tissue impeding the signal has only been done in labratory experiments. Being able to do so regularly, cheaply, and, most importantly, easily would probably be the medical breakthrough of the century outside of a true brain machine interface.

    Once we're able to do so, life altering injuries would be a thing of the past.
     
  17. lannister80 macrumors 6502

    lannister80

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    #17
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2140379/

    "Self/less"

    "An extremely wealthy man, dying from cancer, undergoes a radical medical procedure that transfers his consciousness into the body of a healthy young man. But all is not as it seems when he starts to uncover the mystery of the body's origin and the organization that will kill to protect its cause."
     
  18. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #18
    Would anyone consider the whole "Vanilla Sky" scenario where they freeze your body right after you die? or at least your head?
     
  19. bradl macrumors 68040

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    #19
    Star Trek: The Next Generation, Season 1, Episode 26: The Neutral Zone. Part of the story:

    One had died from emphysema, while another died of a failed liver, due to too much drinking.

    It would be the sci-fi in me, but back at that time, I didn't want to die as much as I don't want to now, and thought it would be cool to do it. Not sure now..

    BL.
     
  20. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #20
    Thanks to modern medicine, I will be celebrating my 238th birthday next month. I've only had three body transplants and two head transplants!
     
  21. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #21
    Utter nonsense.

    But wait, if it works, does it mean they'll take all of those people out of cryogenics? :rolleyes:
     
  22. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #22
    Yup. Considering that's the whole point of it.

    Then we'd have hundreds of people wandering around the future, wondering why we still don't have flying cars.
     
  23. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #23
    And wondering why we have yet another Bush and Clinton fighting for the White House. ;)

    BL.
     
  24. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #24
    I, for one, can't wait for my great great grandkids to vote for Chelsea XIV.
     
  25. WestonHarvey1 macrumors 68020

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    Resurrecting those people requires much more far-out technology than a body transplant. There's far too much cellular damage from the freezing process.
     

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