Gay men sue counselors who promised to make them straight

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Hugh, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. Hugh macrumors 6502a

    Hugh

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    #1
  2. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #2

    I dislike that people do this, but this suing them is about as dumb as suing a fortune teller for the future not coming true.
     
  3. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    They absolutely should sue them. They're promising something they can't deliver. And if the law won't make this stuff illegal, then this is about the only other course to take. Sue them out of business.
     
  4. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    Might as well sue your local church. This lawsuit is just as dumb.

    How do we know that it didn't work and they are just pretending to be gay to get money?

    And if you were really "tricked" by such a promise, sorry but that's just your fault. You can't go around suing everybody on the planet for your own stupidity.
     
  5. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    You also are not permitted to damage people just because they submit to your quackery and believe your promises. Preying on people who are weak is not exactly legal either. For example, if someone give you permission to murder them, you don't suddenly get away with murder.
     
  6. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    Not even close to the same thing

    and if somebody gave you permission to kill them, it wouldn't be murder
     
  7. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

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    Only in Ohio?

    Pity.
     
  8. angelneo, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012

    angelneo macrumors 68000

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    Personally, I still think if someone sells you a service that "promises" something, it should still do that, although it's possible that there's some fine print somewhere to indemnify the provider.
     
  9. MorphingDragon, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012

    MorphingDragon macrumors 603

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    Bad analogy, not even close to the same service for a start. It's more like going to a councillor for depression who then precedes to tell you you're a bad person for being depressed and you should pray to god for help.
     
  10. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #10
  11. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

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  12. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    After reading the filing, I think that the mothers should be in trouble for abuse, and the counselors sued into oblivion.

    But philosophically, I'm opposed to generally suing people in this manner.

    ----------

    Both are pretty much the same thing imo.
     
  13. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    Your opinion and practice are different things. They would be the same if council sessions consisted of mainly "You're going to **** a chick some day". I don't think a fortune teller ever instructed someone to beat someone with a tennis racquet while screaming at them.

     
  14. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    As I said, after reading the actual filing, yes they should be sued.

    But generally suing people for such a thing? Disagree.
     
  15. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    I kind of wonder if they have to sign a waiver of any kind indicating a lack of guarantees. It is nonsense, yet I don't know that a ban will be all that effective. It's unfortunate that people can't always see past those that prey on their hopes.
     
  16. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    If it's in the law for someone to sue, go right ahead. Not my problem.
     
  17. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #17
    So I assume you were ok with such lawsuits as

    "this coffee that's super hot isn't marked as hot and it burnt me"?

    It's in the law after all...

    ----------

    I say ban pyramid schemes and infomercial stuff. Ban weight loss supplements that don't work too.
     
  18. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Those would be the kinds of things that came to mind when I mentioned potential lack of effectiveness. Bans are pointless if you either won't enforce them or lack the unallocated resources.
     
  19. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #19
    You mean that case where the lady suffered 3rd degree burns?

    Try Harder.

    ..and yes. You live in a country which entitles you to sue. If you want to change it, petition your government instead of whining on the internet.
     
  20. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    Hot coffee is hot

    The ole' like it or leave it fallacy
     
  21. MorphingDragon, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012

    MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #21
    Hot coffee should not give someone 2nd or 3rd degree burns. Don't make yourself look stupid.



    http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/the-fallacy-fallacy

    No, there is no discussion to be had. It's like the gun rights discussions, just another opportunity for someone to stroke themselves off while typing on a keyboard and the mods decide what limb they should tear off next.
     
  22. Sydde macrumors 68020

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    So far, anyway. Every now and then, some bunch of [unprintables] get a hair up their dark side about so called "tort reform", which always seems to be about reining in the average person's right to file a lawsuit. Curiously, the tort reformers tend to line up with the glibertarians, so they offer us a big platter of free-to-do-whatever-you-want alongside a steaming tureen of probably-not-able-to-sue-someone-for-behaving-irresponsibly.
     
  23. Andeavor macrumors 6502

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    There is one big difference; fiddling with a person's psyche is vastly different than burning them with hot coffee. These conversion therapies are akin to brainwashing, a scam which should be illegal bar none.

    Dealing with a person and their issues with their sexual orientation needs to be addressed by a professional psychiatrist - even a specialized psychologist will do - and the last time I checked, homosexuality is not listed among "treatable conditions".

    In this case suing is acceptable.
     
  24. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    Until the US gets systems in place to have proper recourse (like tribunals), suing is the best you got and should stay.
     
  25. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #25
    Why does this "psyche" distinction matter?

    And the comparison with the hot coffee is basically to point out frivolous lawsuits. Even if the coffee is 250 degrees, you still know that it is hot and that you should let it cool before consuming.

    One of the things that sucks about this country is the ability to sue people for anything. No matter how stupid it is.
     

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